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Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder (2005)

by Richard Louv

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,531445,830 (4)31
Family & Relationships. Nature. Nonfiction. HTML: The Book That Launched an International Movement
 
‚??An absolute must-read for parents.‚?Ě ‚??The Boston Globe
 
‚??It rivals Rachel Carson‚??s Silent Spring.‚?Ě ‚??The Cincinnati Enquirer
 
‚??I like to play indoors better ‚??cause that‚??s where all the electrical outlets are,‚?Ě reports a fourth grader. But it‚??s not only computers, television, and video games that are keeping kids inside. It‚??s also their parents‚?? fears of traffic, strangers, Lyme disease, and West Nile virus; their schools‚?? emphasis on more and more homework; their structured schedules; and their lack of access to natural areas. Local governments, neighborhood associations, and even organizations devoted to the outdoors are placing legal and regulatory constraints on many wild spaces, sometimes making natural play a crime.
As children‚??s connections to nature diminish and the social, psychological, and spiritual implications become apparent, new research shows that nature can offer powerful therapy for such maladies as depression, obesity, and attention deficit disorder. Environment-based education dramatically improves standardized test scores and grade-point averages and develops skills in problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making. Anecdotal evidence strongly suggests that childhood experiences in nature stimulate creativity.
In Last Child in the Woods, Louv talks with parents, children, teachers, scientists, religious leaders, child-development researchers, and environmentalists who recognize the threat and offer solutions. Louv shows us an alternative future, one in which parents help their kids experience the natural world more deeply‚??and find the joy of family connectedness in the process.
 Now includes
A Field Guide with 100 Practical Actions We Can Take
Discussion Points for Book Groups, Classrooms, and Communities
Additional Notes by the Author
New and Updated Research from the U.S. and Abroad
Richard Louv's new book, … (more)
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» See also 31 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
Gathers together some of the evidence that nature is necessary to well being. Explains some of the barriers, legal and social that interfere with this important connection and suggests remedies for the future ( )
  cspiwak | Mar 6, 2024 |
The book is fabulous. I grew up in a place where nature was never far away. We spent two weeks in the woods when I was a Boy Scout in England. After my return to my current home, I discovered we had been busy replacing trees with concrete.

Richard Louv's term, "nature-deficit disorder," is timely. As he mentioned, we study microbiology without smelling a plant or looking at an animal in its natural habitat. Our obsession with technology has taken us away from our natural roots, leaving fear in its place. We need to reclaim our connection with nature. It will make us whole again.

Richard Louv's book is a welcome reminder. It is a call. We must heed the call, and integrate the lessons into our education curriculum. ( )
  RajivC | Feb 12, 2024 |
Nature-deficit disorder is not a medical condition; it is a description of the human costs of alienation from nature. This alienation damages children and shapes adults, families, and communities. There are solutions, though, and they're right in our own backyards. Last child in the Woods is the first book to bring together cutting-edge research showing that direct exposure to nature is essential for healthy childhood development‚ÄĒphysical, emotional, and spiritual. What's more, nature is a potent therapy for depression, obesity, and ADD. Environment-based education dramatically improves standardized test scores and grade point averages and develops skills in problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making. Even creativity is stimulated by childhood experiences in nature. Selected Reading Questionnaire.
  ACRF | Sep 23, 2022 |
What an important book. I am inspired to reconnect with nature and saddened by the distance between people and nature today. ( )
  samanddiane1999 | Jun 22, 2022 |
I ended up speed reading the second half of the book so I could return it to the library. I think every parent should read this. There are a lot of people clueless about how important nature is. They see it as a dirty inconvenience in their clean white shoes, white carpet, white house lives.
The field guide of actions we can take seems like the best part to me. In a world where everyone is willing to tell us something is a problem but not offer solutions, the field guide is a refreshing list of easy things almost anyone can do. ( )
  jenniebooknerd | Dec 31, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Louv, Richardprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hogan, JonathanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
RogozinŐĀska, AnnaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
TemuŐąrcuŐą, CeyhanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Valle, Bego√ĪaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verboom, JanaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verheń≥, CecielTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
There was a child who went forth every day, And the first object he look'd upon, that object he became, And that object became part of him for the day or a certain part of the day, Or for many years or stretching cycles of years. The early lilacs became part of this child, And grass and red and white morning glories, and white and red clover, and the song of the phoebe-bird, And the Third-month lambs and the sow's pink-faint litter, and the mare's foal, and the cow's calf,....
--Walt Whitman
I like to play indoors better 'cause that's where all the electrical outlets are. --A fourth-grader in San Diego
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For Jason and Matthew
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One evening, when my boys were younger, Matthew, then ten, looked at me from across a restaurant table and said quite seriously, Dad, how come it was more fun when you were a kid?
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Wikipedia in English (4)

Family & Relationships. Nature. Nonfiction. HTML: The Book That Launched an International Movement
 
‚??An absolute must-read for parents.‚?Ě ‚??The Boston Globe
 
‚??It rivals Rachel Carson‚??s Silent Spring.‚?Ě ‚??The Cincinnati Enquirer
 
‚??I like to play indoors better ‚??cause that‚??s where all the electrical outlets are,‚?Ě reports a fourth grader. But it‚??s not only computers, television, and video games that are keeping kids inside. It‚??s also their parents‚?? fears of traffic, strangers, Lyme disease, and West Nile virus; their schools‚?? emphasis on more and more homework; their structured schedules; and their lack of access to natural areas. Local governments, neighborhood associations, and even organizations devoted to the outdoors are placing legal and regulatory constraints on many wild spaces, sometimes making natural play a crime.
As children‚??s connections to nature diminish and the social, psychological, and spiritual implications become apparent, new research shows that nature can offer powerful therapy for such maladies as depression, obesity, and attention deficit disorder. Environment-based education dramatically improves standardized test scores and grade-point averages and develops skills in problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making. Anecdotal evidence strongly suggests that childhood experiences in nature stimulate creativity.
In Last Child in the Woods, Louv talks with parents, children, teachers, scientists, religious leaders, child-development researchers, and environmentalists who recognize the threat and offer solutions. Louv shows us an alternative future, one in which parents help their kids experience the natural world more deeply‚??and find the joy of family connectedness in the process.
 Now includes
A Field Guide with 100 Practical Actions We Can Take
Discussion Points for Book Groups, Classrooms, and Communities
Additional Notes by the Author
New and Updated Research from the U.S. and Abroad
Richard Louv's new book,

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