HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

A Girl's Story (2016)

by Annie Ernaux

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3251879,013 (3.86)25
"In Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman, Annie Ernaux revisits the night 50 years earlier when she found herself submerged and controlled by another person's desire and willpower. It is the summer of 1958, the year she turned 18. And then the man she gave herself to moves on. She has submitted her will to his, and now she finds that she is a slave without a master. Now, fifty years later, she realizes she can obliterate the intervening years and return to consider this young woman that until now she wanted to forget completely. And to discover that here was the vital, violent and dolorous origin of her writing life, her writer's identity, built out of shame, violence, betrayal"--… (more)
  1. 00
    Do What They Say Or Else by Annie Ernaux (thorold)
    thorold: Ce qu'ils disent ou rien is a fictional treatment of the same period in her life that Ernaux explores (40 years later) in the autobiographical Mémoire de fille.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 25 mentions

English (8)  Dutch (3)  French (2)  Catalan (1)  Danish (1)  Spanish (1)  German (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (18)
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
She was sexually abused as a young girl by a fellow camp counselor, and fell into an obsessive love for her abuser. Only much later in life did she see clearly what had happened, and writing this book, where the early scenes are distanced by the third person, became her catharsis. Raw, searing, honest. ( )
  bobbieharv | Jan 28, 2024 |
Some fifty years later, Ernaux looks back on herself in 1958, the summer she turned 18 and worked as a camp counselor. She had a sexual encounter there, which was deeply meaningful to her at the time, and reflects on both what happened and her distance now from the girl she was then.

This book appears to be more a straight up memoir than the autofiction of the books of Ernaux's I've read before, but still has her signature style of writing about her memories and also talking about the writing process as she goes ("On this gray November Sunday in 2014, I watch the girl who was me watch him turn his back on her in front of all the others..."). It's especially effective here in illustrating that weird sort of dichotomy that happens as you look back at a memory that once held deep emotion in the original experience, but now has a sort of remove. Which is, essentially, what the book is about.

The "girl of '58" leaves her small town and parochial school, works as a camp counselor, and has sexual experiences. One other counselor, H, is the object of her affections, but though he has sex with her, he's largely indifferent to her (and has a fiancee whom he tells her is the only girl he loves) though this summer is a life-changing experience for her. I didn't expect to be as pulled into her story as I was, as Ernaux was able to make me sympathize with her naivete (even while I thought her choices foolish), and she largely keeps from judging her younger self - and H himself. The second part of the book, outlining the year or two that followed that summer, were less compelling and didn't have that same immediacy. It was almost like she wasn't sure where to stop the story, and maybe carried on a little too long before a rather abrupt ending. Though it's not as good as A Man's Place or A Woman's Story, it was well worth the time spent reading. ( )
  bell7 | Jan 21, 2024 |
Ho comprato questo libro perché da diverso tempo vedevo il nome di Annie Ernaux qui su GR e Anobii, sono un po' scarsa in letteratura francese e quindi quando l'ho visto nella caotica libreria dell'amico Flavio ho deciso di prenderlo. Il primo impatto è stato respingente, mi chiedevo costantemente cosa mi facesse voltare pagina. Come ho già detto per la ciabatti, in questo momento non mi va tanto di addentrarmi nei monologhi interiori (più o meno autoccommiseranti) e leggere questo memoir è impegnativo, perché non è romanzatissimo, c'è un continuo salto avanti indietro nel tempo, fra la memoria e l'ora, oltre ad altri recenti passati in cui si cercava di rievocare la memoria. Quindi si, la lettura era parecchio pesante, dopo poche pagine finivo per addormentarmi sul divano. Poi un po' alla volta sono entrata in sincronia con l'autrice e ci ho trovato il la. Strano leggere dell'educazione sentimentale di una fanciulla in fiore a quasi 43 anni, ma avvincente. Bello poi aver trovato i riferimenti alla Sagan di Bonjour Tristesse e a Pamela Moore di Cioccolata a colazione. Così mi sono tuffata in weekend di letture sullo sviluppo delle giovani donne e il loro aprirsi alla vita. davvero avvincente. ( )
  Mav_Danto | Jul 28, 2023 |
Although a memoir, it reads almost like the story of a third person. Ernaux is quite detached from her former self - critical and quite judgemental.
She describes dreadful situations in an almost clinical way as if she feels little sympathy for the person, herself, experiencing them. It is a very new form of writing for me - the honesty is shocking at times. A wonderful read.
  rosiezbanks | Jan 5, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (19 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Annie Ernauxprimary authorall editionscalculated
Strayer, Alison L.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Publisher Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"In Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman, Annie Ernaux revisits the night 50 years earlier when she found herself submerged and controlled by another person's desire and willpower. It is the summer of 1958, the year she turned 18. And then the man she gave herself to moves on. She has submitted her will to his, and now she finds that she is a slave without a master. Now, fifty years later, she realizes she can obliterate the intervening years and return to consider this young woman that until now she wanted to forget completely. And to discover that here was the vital, violent and dolorous origin of her writing life, her writer's identity, built out of shame, violence, betrayal"--

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.86)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 9
3.5 9
4 34
4.5 4
5 9

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 202,091,314 books! | Top bar: Always visible