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Infinity's Shore (1996)

by David Brin

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Second Uplift Trilogy (2), Uplift Saga (5)

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1,80496,529 (3.84)8
On the planet Jijo, peace is upended when the starship Streaker arrives, bringing with it knowledge of a two-billion-year-old fleet and hordes of followers eager to exploit its power.

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» See also 8 mentions

English (8)  Finnish (1)  All languages (9)
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
More confusion, but still Brin and so it slips into 3-star category. His first Uplift trilogy is superior. ( )
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
In Infinity's Shore, Brin continues the somewhat atypical story of the castaway races on Jijo from Brightness Reef, but also weaves in all the characters we know and love from his second Uplift book, Startide Rising. With this, of course, comes all of the galactic politics and intrigue that the readers have become accustomed to. This time, the main antagonists are a particularly alien alien race called the Jophur, who are composed of series of quasi-sentient rings merged into one being. It's fun following the supposedly unsophisticated Jijoans surprise the Jophur with their ingenuity, as well as how they learn about and interact with the Earthclan members from Startide Rising. In short, this is the classic David Brin space opera we're used to. My only big complaint is that Brin presents the reader with another non-ending ending, with it occurring pretty much in the middle of the action with very little resolved. Onto the next book, I guess... ( )
  Phrim | Dec 30, 2015 |
This review covers all three books in the 2nd Uplift Trilogy, (Brightness Reef, Infinity's Shore, and Heaven's Reach).

At the end of the day, this rather long story, (nearly 2,000 pages over three volumes), is a good book that leaves some big openings for more adventures in the Uplift Universe. With that said, I really enjoyed the first three Uplift books, (Sundiver, Startide Rising, The Uplift War), more than I did this second trilogy. I think that is due to the stand-alone nature of the initial three volumes. I liked that each of those books told a relatively complete story that was set against a larger backdrop that stayed mostly in the background. Further, this fourth installment, (again, I'm talking about three books here), could have stood some editing. There is quite a bit of repetition of information - and not all of that can be attributed to getting the reader up to speed with what happened in the preceding volume. Rather, it sometimes felt as though Brin had lost some threads and was reminding himself, (and the reader), of where things stood. At times, he was (validly) revisiting a situation from the perspective of a different character - but often it felt like redundant info-dumping. Yes, we know most of the Galactics are against the upstart human 'wolflings' and their client species, the neo-chimps and neo-dolphins - please stop hitting us with that particular truncheon!

On to the good things: The overall story is really pretty great. As an unabashed and unapologetic Space Opera tale, this 2nd Uplift Trilogy does not disappoint. Throughout these Uplift books, Brin has taken a 'kitchen-sink' approach to the science, (he even says so in the afterword). He throws one big idea on top of another on top of third and a fourth. And then keeps doing it! His position as consultant for NASA is showing here in a big way - and that's a good thing because the ideas are grand and he does a good job of laying it out for us lay-people. Among all that science and big ideas, there are also a wide variety of characters to track - and there is a fair amount of head-hopping as a result - but Brin is a talented enough writer that he pulls off that aspect quite well. Helping to ease the transitions, most perspective shifts happen at logical chapter breaks. Now, with such a large cast of players, some are bound to be more interesting than others and a handful of characters do seemingly get short shrift - but I can see where Brin might re-visit some of them in order to explore their stories in greater depth. There are also other characters from the first three books that don't show up here at all, (most notably the ones left behind on Kithrup at the end of Startide Rising - which was, for me, the standout book of the entire Uplift series). I hope Brin's future plans include coming back to tie up some of those loose ends.

Having finally finished this trilogy, I feel like I have completed a marathon. Not that I've ever run a real marathon! LOL! Still, with the unrelenting onslaught of difficulties that every character seemed to be going through, always battling uphill against incredible odds. Facing implacable enemies. Managing one hair-breadth escape after another... it's nice to call this one done - at least for now.

Next up, I might have to try a nice post-apocalyptic story - just to lighten the mood! ;) ( )
  ScoLgo | Feb 27, 2015 |
UPLIFT
  rustyoldboat | May 28, 2011 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
David Brinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Burns, JimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gambino, FredCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jones, ErinReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lenagh, KevinMapssecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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to
Ariana Mae, our splendid envoy
who will speak for us at the threshold of the fantastic twenty-second century.
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This was published in Germany as two books called Das Ufer der Unendlichkeit and Die Botschaft der Delphine.
This was published in France as two books called Le chemin des bannis and Les rives de l'infini.
Do not combine either the French or German books with this work.
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Haiku summary
Dolphins spout haikus!
Also speak Anglic. In Space
They're piloting ships!!!!
(pickupsticks)

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David Brin is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

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