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The Choice

by Edith Eger

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6942627,827 (4.39)14
THE AWARDWINNING, INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER'The Choice is a gift to humanity. One of those rare and eternal stories that you don't want to end and that leave you forever changed' DESMOND TUTU, Nobel Peace Prize LaureateIn 1944, sixteen-year-old Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz. There she endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. Over the coming months, Edith's bravery helped her sister to survive, and led to her bunkmates rescuing her during a death march. When their camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.In The Choice, Dr Edith Eger shares her experience of the Holocaust and the remarkable stories of those she has helped ever since. Today, she is an internationally acclaimed psychologist whose patients include survivors of abuse and soldiers suffering from PTSD. She explains how many of us live within a mind that has become a prison, and shows how freedom becomes possible once we confront our suffering.Like Viktor Frankl's Man's Search for Meaning, but exceptional in its own right, The Choice is life changing. Warm, compassionate and infinitely wise, it is a profound examination of the human spirit, and our capacity to heal.… (more)
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English (24)  German (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (26)
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
"How can I be useful to you?"

"How can I support you as you take responsibility for yourself?"

I had expected The Choice: Embrace the Possible to really move and inspire me. Instead I was left feeling lukewarm. This is a difficult subject and Edith Ever is clearly a brave, strong, and amazing woman. Her story is split into two parts: the war and her work. There wasn't much new when it came to the war portion. We've heard most of these stories before. The difference here is that these are Edith's stories and Edith's experience of them.

Her recollection of saying her mum was her mum and not her sister, in the selection line is one that I will never forget. It was a moment that was meant to honour her mother, but ultimately ended up sending her to the gas chamber. I'm not sure how one truly manages to make peace with such an innocent, yet tragic, action. Edith's work now, while interesting, is something I am quite familiar with personally and professionally. It reminded me fondly of those times and of all the self help books I used to buy (and sometimes read) while living in the UK.

Overall, an important story and an okay book. Just not as motivational as I was expecting. ( )
  eesti23 | May 13, 2022 |
It is a story about a holocaust survivor ,but also it is a lot more than surviving the holocaust. It is a story about healing . A story about finding hope despite everything . A story to find a way to our freedom ,from the prison we put ourselves in. ( )
  RupaliP29 | Feb 11, 2022 |
Edith Eger was only 16 when she and her family were sent to Auschwitz. Although Edith’s slight stature made her appear younger than she was, she and her sister survived the initial “winnowing’ line and were sent into the camp to join what would eventually become work details. Her parents were sent to the other line – and probably gassed that same day.

Later that initial day she was made to dance for Mengele as she was a promising ballerina.

She survived the ordeal in the camp by the very thinnest margin. When the allies liberated the camp, Edith was found in a pile of bodies. Her back was broken and she could barely speak. Nevertheless, she was found and rescued and eventually regained her health.

It took her decades to become reconciled with her internment and she was even able to find forgiveness in her heart for her captors. She became a therapist and motivational speaker, urging people to look forward. She specialized in resiliency training and the treatment of PTSD.

These stories of WWII Jewish death camps are very hard to read. For me the stories of Jewish treatment by German citizens after the Jews were released are just a mind boggling.

Nevertheless, this a wonderful, inspirational book. Dr Egan lights the way with her story at a time I am struggling with all the current crises- pandemic, political and ecological. Hope can be found in the direst of situations. ( )
  streamsong | Dec 16, 2021 |
La version femenina de "El hombre en busca de sentido" de Viktor Frankl
De hecho la autora de esta libro va a leer el libro de Viktor y le cambiara la vida.
Ella misma paso por experiencias parecidas, yo diria peores, en campos de concentracion nazis y de esas experiencias ha sacado conclusiones psicologicas que expone en este libro.

Para mi la parte mas interesante era la de la psicologia, y la que menos la historia de su familia, creo que habria que cortar unas cuantas paginas ahi. Por lo demas muy bien, un libro que te hace ver la vida con otra perpectiva. ( )
  trusmis | Sep 30, 2021 |
I read this book because I heard Dr. Brene Brown interview Dr. Eger (the author) on her podcast. This book is heart wrenching and beautiful at the same time. I appreciated learning about trauma and responding to it, but it feels irreverent to talk about Dr. Eger’s experiences at Auschwitz, and what she’s done since then, so here are some words directly from the book, from the discussion guide:

The Choice is a powerful, moving memoir—and a practical guide to healing—written by Dr. Edith Eva Eger, an eminent psychologist whose own experiences as a Holocaust survivor help her treat patients and guide them toward freedom from trauma, grief, and fear. One of the few living Holocaust survivors to remember the horrors of the camps, Edie has chosen to forgive her captors and find joy in her life every day. The Choice weaves Eger’s personal story with case studies from her work as a psychologist. Her patients and their stories illustrate different phases of healing and show how people can choose to escape the prisons they construct in their minds and find freedom, regardless of circumstance. Eger’s story is an inspiration for everyone. ( )
  DwaynesBookList | Sep 25, 2021 |
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For the five generations of my family
my father, Lajos, who taught me to laugh;
my mother, Ilona, who helped me find what I needed inside;
my gorgeous and unbelievable sisters, Magda and Klara;
my children: Marianne, Audrey, and John;
and their children: Lindsey, Jordan, Rachel, David, and Ashley;
and their children's children: Silas, Graham, and Hale
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I didn't know about the loaded gun hidden under his shirt, but the instant Captain Jason Fuller walked into my El Paso office on a summer day in 1980, my gut tightened and the back of my neck stung.
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No one can make you a victim but you. We become victims not because of what happens to us but when we choose to hold on to our victimization.
It's okay to help people - - and it's okay to need help - - but when your enabling allows others not to help themselves, then you're crippling the people you want to help.
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THE AWARDWINNING, INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER'The Choice is a gift to humanity. One of those rare and eternal stories that you don't want to end and that leave you forever changed' DESMOND TUTU, Nobel Peace Prize LaureateIn 1944, sixteen-year-old Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz. There she endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. Over the coming months, Edith's bravery helped her sister to survive, and led to her bunkmates rescuing her during a death march. When their camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.In The Choice, Dr Edith Eger shares her experience of the Holocaust and the remarkable stories of those she has helped ever since. Today, she is an internationally acclaimed psychologist whose patients include survivors of abuse and soldiers suffering from PTSD. She explains how many of us live within a mind that has become a prison, and shows how freedom becomes possible once we confront our suffering.Like Viktor Frankl's Man's Search for Meaning, but exceptional in its own right, The Choice is life changing. Warm, compassionate and infinitely wise, it is a profound examination of the human spirit, and our capacity to heal.

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