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Night (1958)

by Elie Wiesel

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Night Trilogy (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
22,437513113 (4.28)550
Night offers a personal and unforgettable account of the appalling horrors of Hitler's reign of terror. Through the eyes of 14-year-old Eliezer, we behold the tragic fate of the Jews from the little town of Sighet. Even as they are stuffed into cattle cars bound for Auschwitz, the townspeople refuse to believe rumors of anti-Semitic atrocities. Not until they are marched toward the blazing crematory at the camp's "reception center" does the terrible truth sink in.… (more)
Read (18)
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Europe (45)
1950s (153)
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» See also 550 mentions

English (497)  Italian (3)  Spanish (2)  French (2)  Greek (1)  Swedish (1)  Norwegian (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (508)
Showing 1-5 of 497 (next | show all)
A really superb account of a young boy's experiences going from Sighet in Transylvania to Auschwitz. This book was a really emotional read and the sort of thing that should be taught in schools in my opinion. Bravely, Weisel also covers some of the more controversial aspects of his experiences when he effectively had to put his life before someone else's. Doing that must have been hard but admitting it and putting it into words afterwards for others to see must have been even harder. ( )
  Brian. | Apr 4, 2021 |
I still think this book is pretty fabulous. From a teaching perspective I would still give it 5 stars. From a "I Like to Read Books on My Own" perspective it would probably be like a 4. I don't typically like to read books where someone meaningful dies right at the end... but that does have to happen at times doesn't it? Especially during the Holocaust when the likelihood of a family member surviving was extremely slim in the first place. With that said, I believe that I will continue to teach this book for several years to come. ( )
  courty4189 | Mar 24, 2021 |
This book was the first Holocaust memoir that I read in full, but for all that it’s a slim volume it has always stayed with me as a powerful experience, remembrance, and testimony. Coming back to it years later, this time without the lens of academia insisting on a thought-provoking analysis to get a good grade, I’m still left wanting to write. What I want to write, I’m not sure, though, as the book opens up so many emotions that I’m left with a feeling of emptiness and regret. Not regret for having read the book, of course, but regret that humanity sat idle and did nothing while those around them suffered; regret that those in power turned away refugees who would have elsewise been saved; regret that even with its shining moments humanity has at its core a darkness that must be acknowledged. Even with the hindsight of 75 years it often seems that we have yet to learn from the mistakes of the past, as we continue to allow those who warp power for their own gain to lead and to allow cruelty to overrule compassion. And yet, we have persevered throughout, so while the book may not leave readers with a happy feeling in their gut (or much more than a cliffhanger, not knowing what truly happens to the narrator until the subsequent books) we know that there are still next steps to be taken by those who are able and can make them. ( )
  JaimieRiella | Feb 25, 2021 |
I'd never read this -- amazing? Or maybe I'm just that old. I'm kind of glad I waited because this is a new translation from the original Yiddish, done by Elie Wiesel's wife Marion, "who knows my voice and how to transmit it better than anyone else."

"The witness has forced himself to testify." And this person has at long last witnessed his testimony. It seemed necessary. Metta.

I read the first edition of this translation, a slim paperback with tanned pages, which I found at Goodwill.

Around the year in 52 books challenge notes:
#22. A book with the major theme of survival ( )
  Linda_Louise | Jan 20, 2021 |
Harrowing and necessary, perhaps the more so in the current political climate in the U.S. At the beginning of the timeline, the people really had no idea of the enormity of was coming even in the face of mounting fear, and sometimes I worry that the same is true of current U.S. citizens, that in 2 years, or 4, or ten, we'll find ourselves in a place we would never today have conceived possible. ( )
  dllh | Jan 6, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 497 (next | show all)
[Wiesel's] slim volume of terrifying power is the documentary of a boy - himself- who survived the "Night" that destroyed his parents and baby sister, but lost his God.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Wiesel, Elieprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
BLÁHOVÁ, AlenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
BROWN, Robert McAfeePrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
BRUNT, Ninisecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
COUMANS, KikiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
GUIDALL, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
MAURIAC, FrançoisForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
MELLON, Andrewsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
MEYER-CLASON, CurtTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
NICASTRO, Deansecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
RODWAY, StellaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
ROSENBLATT, JeffreyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
SPARKS, RichardIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
VOGELMANN, Danielsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
WIESEL, MarionTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Canonical title
Original title
Night ( [1960]English)
Alternative titles
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Epigraph
Dedication
In memory of my parents and of my little sister, Tzipora

E.W.
This new translation

in memory of

my grandparents, Abba, Sarah, and Hachman,

who also vanished into that night

M.W.
First words
They called him Moshe the Beadle, as though he had never had a surname in his life.
Quotations
At about six o'clock in the evening, the first American tank stood at the gates of Buchenwald. Our first act as free men was to throw ourselves onto the provisions. We thought only of that. Not of revenge, not of our families. Nothing but bread. And even when we were no longer hungry, there was still no one who thought of revenge.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Night offers a personal and unforgettable account of the appalling horrors of Hitler's reign of terror. Through the eyes of 14-year-old Eliezer, we behold the tragic fate of the Jews from the little town of Sighet. Even as they are stuffed into cattle cars bound for Auschwitz, the townspeople refuse to believe rumors of anti-Semitic atrocities. Not until they are marched toward the blazing crematory at the camp's "reception center" does the terrible truth sink in.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
An incredible reaccounting of one boy's experience in the horrific hand's of the Nazi's in WWII. Elie Wiesl, a fourteen-year-old Jewish boy, is captured by the German Nazis and forced to do and experience unimaginable things. This story is unforgettable and heart-wrenching as we are able to zoom in and watch an innocent boy be mistreated and abused in the hands of the evil Nazis. Alhough terribly sad, this book sheds a light on some of the most horrific actions of man and is told in such a powerful way that a reader could not simply forget this story; that is why it made the top ten on my list.
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Average: (4.28)
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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140189890, 0141038993

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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