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Night (1956)

by Elie Wiesel

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Night Trilogy (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
27,692574106 (4.29)597
Biography & Autobiography. History. Nonfiction. An enduring classic of Holocaust literature, Night offers a personal and unforgettable account of the appalling horrors of Hitler's reign of terror. Through the eyes of 14-year-old Eliezer, we behold the tragic fate of the Jews from the little town of Sighet. Even as they are stuffed into cattle cars bound for Auschwitz, the townspeople refuse to believe rumors of anti-Semitic atrocities. Not until they are marched toward the blazing crematory at the camp's "reception center" does the terrible truth sink in. Narrator George Guidall intensifies the emotional impact as blind hope turns to utter horror. His performance captures the profound agony of young Eliezer as he witnesses the suffering and death of his family and loses all that he holds sacred.… (more)
Europe (1)
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Read (13)
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» See also 597 mentions

English (554)  Italian (4)  Dutch (2)  French (2)  Spanish (2)  German (1)  Swedish (1)  Norwegian (1)  Greek (1)  All languages (568)
Showing 1-5 of 554 (next | show all)
At the age of 15, Elie was forced into a cattle car with his father, mother and younger sister. His mother and sister were immediately sent to the chimney. He and his father struggled to survive in the concentration camp, enduring death, and destruction of the soul. This was a heartbreaking book. I was particularly touched by the forward and the author’s words when receiving his Nobel Peace Prize. I also found it important that he fought to get this manuscript published in a time where no one spoke of the holocaust. His words remind us to never forget. ( )
  JanaRose1 | May 8, 2024 |
don't know how to rate this because it is so horrifying...I read it twice for school and both times it was utterly devastating and terrifying. It is an incredibly important book that everyone should read. But no one, I repeat, NO ONE, should ever have to read this alone. ( )
  superducky800 | Apr 13, 2024 |
I am struggling to review this book as I am quite conflicted. I didn't find it terribly impactful, yet to critic it almost feels sacrilege given its subject matter.

I appreciate what a horrific time and memory this must be for the author, and I give a lot of grace to the fact that it is his 15-year-old perspective written when he was quite some years older. That being said, for all the conversation (read hype) surrounding Night, I expected so much more; that is on me.

As someone who has delved quite deep into this part of history, I feel there are far more detailed, perhaps even accurately portrayed writings available that will leave the reader with a better understanding of the suffering that occurred during the Holocaust. That being said, this book has its place, it just isn't the homerun read that it has been made out to be -- feels watered down.

In learning more about the book and its apparent numerous renditions, that is likely what has occurred, the 800 original score has been whittled down through each language translation. It now is just over 100 pages for us English readers. Too bad, really, as I think we could have taken away much more and the effect could have been far more powerful had the pages remained.

As with all books on the Holocaust, this book deserves to be read, it may strike that cord necessary for the reader to see people and the world differently so that they stand up as needed to those being wrongly persecuted. ( )
  LyndaWolters1 | Apr 3, 2024 |
Eliezer was 15 years old when he, his sister and his parents were taken prisoner by the Nazis and deported from their home in Sighet, Transylvania, for the crime of being Jewish. Upon arrival to the concentration camp of Auschwitz, Eliezer and his father were separated from Eliezer’s mother and sister, never to see them again. To survive the most inhumane conditions imaginable and to avoid immediate death, Eliezer and his father desperately tried to keep up their strength, thereby demonstrating to the Nazis their usefulness in their ability to work. Each day brought new horrors, torture, starvation, exposure, exhaustion, and illness. Constantly, death hovered over them and the other prisoners. Their challenge: how to avoid the physical and emotional damage that hastened that almost certain death.

The author does a stunning job of presenting the difficult subject of the Holocaust. He follows a father and son as they move from a religiously-observant life in Transylvania to the agonizingly slow and painful experience of deportation and imprisonment in a series of concentration camps. To make this story more acceptable, the author makes it neither long nor frightfully graphic. It presents in clear detail the movements and emotions of one young man caught in an unreal world and how he suffers in his attempt to survive. What causes the greatest sadness and horror to the reader is the slow realization of the degree to which man can inflict physical and emotional pain on another human being with little or no remorse. It is a difficult lesson but one which needs to be taught, understood, and remembered by all people. Elie Wiesel begins this terrible education with Night. ( )
  SqueakyChu | Mar 11, 2024 |
This is an excellent, dark, very troubling, and - if you read the forward and especially the author's acceptance speech of the Nobel Peace Prize - inspiring book.

It is a fast read about a Jewish teenager taken from his home in 1944 to Nazi prison camps. It echoes the dire need to avoid complacency and do something, no matter what or how little, to help those in need. To not ignore the warnings that something is not quite right.

A few days after finishing the book I read an excerpt of a letter to the U.S. Congress from Gao Zhisheng, a Chinese human-rights lawyer. He said, "May the light of freedom shine upon China, let evil have no place to hide, and may the mistreated no longer be in pain." He has been lost in the Chinese prison system since writing that letter in 2007.

Seems that in some places, there has only been slight progress since 1944. ( )
  dlinnen | Feb 3, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 554 (next | show all)
[Wiesel's] slim volume of terrifying power is the documentary of a boy - himself- who survived the "Night" that destroyed his parents and baby sister, but lost his God.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Wiesel, Elieprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
BLÁHOVÁ, AlenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
BROWN, Robert McAfeePrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
BRUNT, Ninisecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
COUMANS, KikiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
GUIDALL, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mauriac, FrancoisForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
MELLON, Andrewsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
MEYER-CLASON, CurtTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
NICASTRO, Deansecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
RODWAY, StellaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
ROSENBLATT, JeffreyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
SPARKS, RichardIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vogelmann, DanielTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
WIESEL, MarionTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
In memory of my parents and of my little sister, Tzipora

E.W.
This new translation

in memory of

my grandparents, Abba, Sarah, and Hachman,

who also vanished into that night

M.W.
First words
They called him Moshe the Beadle, as though he had never had a surname in his life.
Quotations
At about six o'clock in the evening, the first American tank stood at the gates of Buchenwald. Our first act as free men was to throw ourselves onto the provisions. We thought only of that. Not of revenge, not of our families. Nothing but bread. And even when we were no longer hungry, there was still no one who thought of revenge.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Biography & Autobiography. History. Nonfiction. An enduring classic of Holocaust literature, Night offers a personal and unforgettable account of the appalling horrors of Hitler's reign of terror. Through the eyes of 14-year-old Eliezer, we behold the tragic fate of the Jews from the little town of Sighet. Even as they are stuffed into cattle cars bound for Auschwitz, the townspeople refuse to believe rumors of anti-Semitic atrocities. Not until they are marched toward the blazing crematory at the camp's "reception center" does the terrible truth sink in. Narrator George Guidall intensifies the emotional impact as blind hope turns to utter horror. His performance captures the profound agony of young Eliezer as he witnesses the suffering and death of his family and loses all that he holds sacred.

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Book description
An incredible reaccounting of one boy's experience in the horrific hand's of the Nazi's in WWII. Elie Wiesl, a fourteen-year-old Jewish boy, is captured by the German Nazis and forced to do and experience unimaginable things. This story is unforgettable and heart-wrenching as we are able to zoom in and watch an innocent boy be mistreated and abused in the hands of the evil Nazis. Alhough terribly sad, this book sheds a light on some of the most horrific actions of man and is told in such a powerful way that a reader could not simply forget this story; that is why it made the top ten on my list.
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