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Turtles All the Way Down

by John Green

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,4072261,419 (3.96)90
Young Adult Fiction. Young Adult Literature. HTML:FEATURED ON 60 MINUTES and FRESH AIR

ā??So surprising and moving and true that I became completely unstrung.ā? ā?? The New York Times

Named a best book of the year by: The New York Times, NPR, TIMEWall Street JournalBoston Globe, Entertainment WeeklySouthern LivingPublishers Weekly, BookPage, A.V. Club, Bustle, BuzzFeed, Vulture, and many more!


JOHN GREEN, the acclaimed author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, returns with a story of shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.

Aza Holmes never intended to pursue the disappearance of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but thereā??s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Pickettā??s son Davis. 

Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of he
… (more)
  1. 50
    The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (chwiggy)
  2. 30
    Looking for Alaska by John Green (MarchingBandMan)
    MarchingBandMan: The other quasi-existentialist John Green book. Miles Halter deals with existentialism/nihilism in a different way than Aza Holmes, yet this earlier, rawer YA novel expounds on similar themes.
  3. 20
    Paper Towns by John Green (chwiggy)
  4. 00
    Tell Me Three Things by Julie Buxbaum (Micheller7)
  5. 00
    What to Say Next by Julie Buxbaum (Micheller7)
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» See also 90 mentions

English (218)  Spanish (2)  German (2)  Hungarian (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (224)
Showing 1-5 of 218 (next | show all)
truly an amazing book, the plot was literally the best thing ever! I highly recommend if you want to follow along a mystery. ( )
  florrrrr12 | Aug 31, 2023 |
This was one of the most unsatisfying books I have ever read. So many things should have and should not have happened. Also, this book was not as described. There was barely a search for the missing billionaire. ( )
  CaitlinDaugherty | Aug 28, 2023 |
Quite a unique novel about a teenage girl that is in consistent fear of her body being attacked by microbes. Apparently, this is somewhat autobiographical since John Green suffers from a similar condition. This is well written novel that at times feels like a young adult book. Not necessarily a complaint but a warning if YA novels are not your cup of herbal tea. ( )
  GordonPrescottWiener | Aug 24, 2023 |
I made a silly decision to stay away from Turtles All the Way Down by John Green when it came out. Why? Well, the hype was not there. Everyone was boohooing and complaining about how this book was such a letdown, and I let that crowd get to me. And that was such a mistake!

I seriously loved this book. It's a contemporary novel following a teen as she learns to live with her mental health struggles and try to find herself. Throw in a mystery, relationship drama, and friendship rollercoasters, and it's a real winner. The book felt so real and so honest. I applaud John Green for sharing such a personal story, and for pulling at my heart strings yet again.

So what's the book all about? Aza Holmes is your typical teenager - she goes to school, has tons of homework, is thinking about her future, and is trying to find her way in this crazy world. She's got friends, and like most people these days - anxiety. Her anxiety is a struggle, since she hasn't really learned how to live with it yet. That's one big thing this book stresses - we don't just magically get over our troubles and POOF we're fixed - anxiety can be something we need to learn to live with. Throw in a cute but rich boy who's Dad mysteriously disappeared, and her inner Sherlock Holmes (get the last name yet?) comes out. Friendship drama, Star Wars Easter eggs galore, and the value of tripping your way through this crazy journey we call life all packs itself tight in this contemporary, fictional read.

I really liked this book and it was hard to put down. Cast aside the complainers who said this wasn't better than The Fault In Our Stars. This book stands alone in a whole different category, and is clearly a very personal book. It's not a cancer love story, it's a story of personal growth (with a dash of mystery).

This book is not going to be for everyone. It pulls at my heart strings because even as an adult I'm learning how to cope with my internal struggles and how to manage them. It's hard feeling like the friend no one wants to have. It's hard trying to figure out what you want in a relationship. It's extremely tough going through mental health issues when you just don't know WHY it's going on or how to ease your brain down to a manageable level. It's REALLY STINKIN' HARD. This book sat so well with me because I've been there, done that, and now I'm back on the track again. It really hits home. Buuuut... that's also why you might not like it. It can really hit home! It's also not a fast paced love story, which we saw in TFIOS. It's very different and will sit differently depending on your life experiences and expectations of a John Green book.

Overall, my opinion stands that this is an excellent book. It's charming, smart, and is very relatable.

Four out of five stars. ( )
  Briars_Reviews | Aug 4, 2023 |
Oh my goodness. I adore this book. John Green hasn't been my favorite (too much teenage angst for me, thank you very much.) But "Turtles All the Way Down" is different. You can tell that John Green has a personal attachment to the story. Only something that battles the demons of anxiety and mental illness can fully appreciate the realness of this story. It is also a book that needed to be written.

Working in the library, I am really aware of how teenagers are dealing with mental health. Actually I know how I deal with it and how others do--it still feels stigmatized. You feel like less of an individual. As I read, Aza (the protagonist) felt like me. I understood the thoughts that swirled in her head. I have had them in my own life. John Green just put them on paper.

The ending is true to life, which I also appreciated. Mental illness isn't easily explainable. It does affect daily life. I'll just say....read the book and you will get a better understanding, a great appreciation. ( )
  msgabbythelibrarian | Jun 11, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 218 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Greenprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rudd, KateNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Man can do what he wills, but he cannot will what he wills. -Arthur Schopenhauer
Dedication
To Henry and Alice
First words
At the time I first realized I might be fictional, my weekdays were spent at a publicly funded institution on the north side of Indianapolis called White River High School, where I was required to eat lunch at a particular time -- between 12:37 P.M. and 1:14 P.M. -- by forces so much large than myself that I couldn't even begin to identify them.
Quotations
No one ever says goodbye unless they want to see you again.
But I was beginning to learn that your life is a story told about you, not one that you tell....You think you're the painter, but you're the canvas.
Your now is not your forever.
I thought about him asking me if I'd ever been in love. It's  a weird phrase in English, in love, like it's a sea you drown in or a town you live in. You don't get to be in anything else---in friendship or in anger or in hope. All you can be in is love.
Anybody can look at you. Itā€™s quite rare to find someone who sees the same world you see.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Young Adult Fiction. Young Adult Literature. HTML:FEATURED ON 60 MINUTES and FRESH AIR

ā??So surprising and moving and true that I became completely unstrung.ā? ā?? The New York Times

Named a best book of the year by: The New York Times, NPR, TIMEWall Street JournalBoston Globe, Entertainment WeeklySouthern LivingPublishers Weekly, BookPage, A.V. Club, Bustle, BuzzFeed, Vulture, and many more!


JOHN GREEN, the acclaimed author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, returns with a story of shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.

Aza Holmes never intended to pursue the disappearance of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but thereā??s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Pickettā??s son Davis. 

Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of he

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