HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Moon of the Crusted Snow (2018)

by Waubgeshig Rice

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Whitesky Saga (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8126227,290 (3.77)148
"With winter looming, a small northern Anishinaabe community goes dark. Cut off, people become passive and confused. Panic builds as the food supply dwindles. While the band council and a pocket of community members struggle to maintain order, an unexpected visitor arrives, escaping the crumbling society to the south. Soon after, others follow. The community leadership loses its grip on power as the visitors manipulate the tired and hungry to take control of the reserve. Tensions rise and, as the months pass, so does the death toll due to sickness and despair. Frustrated by the building chaos, a group of young friends and their families turn to the land and Anishinaabe tradition in hopes of helping their community thrive again. Guided through the chaos by an unlikely leader named Evan Whitesky, they endeavor to restore order while grappling with a grave decision."--… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 148 mentions

English (61)  French (1)  All languages (62)
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
A humdinger! Both my partner & I each read it in two sittings. Interesting to learn about the culture and to read a snowy tale on a hot summer eve. Made us plan canning ventures! ( )
  featherbooks | May 7, 2024 |
No one worries when the cell service and then the electricity goes out in the small Anishinaabe reservation in the North, but when no communication reaches them for days it becomes clear something apocalyptic has happened. How the community responds is at the heart of Waubgeshig Rice’s Moon of the Crusted Snow — part dystopian novel and part allegory for the treatment of the First Nations. What makes this book chilling is the believability of the situation, but plot holes and uneven writing leave it lacking slightly. ( )
  Hccpsk | Mar 9, 2024 |
In the wake of a mysterious catastrophic event, an isolated Anishinaabe community seems to be much better prepared than the people down south. For them, being left to survive on their own is not something new.

However, soon the refugees from the south will find their way up north. How are the Elders going to react? Can they work together to make it through the winter?

This was a quick and atmospheric read. The plot was interesting, if slow at times.
I loved reading about the way of life of this community, especially the dialogues between the Elders and the main character. This aspect of the book was the best part for me.

The novel is written in very plain language which came across as both a strength and a weakness. The atmosphere was good throughout the novel and very evocative of the title.

However, there were multiple issues with the writing style. I felt some parts were forced on the reader and we keep being told the obvious, which I really disliked.
With books like this, it is clear that the author tries to showcase a culture as well as tell a story. But, often this was done in a way where certain descriptions felt redundant as they didn't add anything to the plot or character development. Characters felt shallow and there was not much development. Even though there are a lot of things happening, we can barely tell by the way characters behave.

The thing I really disliked was the final conflict which was pushed to the extreme. Clearly, the whole setup is an allegory for the complex relationship between the First Nations and the colonial conquerors, but it felt heavy-handed which tilted the balance of an otherwise quiet book. But, judging by all the positive reviews, it struck a chord with the audience.

It seems like there's a sequel in the making. I will definitely pick it up when it comes out simply because I want to see what is left to be said about this story. ( )
  ZeljanaMaricFerli | Mar 4, 2024 |
Pretty good story. About indigenous people living in northern Ontario when some event occured and there was no longer electricity or water or any modern conveniences. So, they had no choice but to live off the land as their ancestors had. ( )
  37143Birnbaum | Feb 9, 2024 |
This tense, apocalyptic thriller is set on a relatively remote Anishinaabe reservation in a fictional version of northern Ontario. One day the telephones go down, then the radio and television, and finally the power. Supply trucks that regularly deliver food and other stapes stop showing up, and as winter sets in, conditions become more dire. No one knows why this happened, and they learn that it is more widespread than their own remote area when two young members of their tribe who were attending university in the nearest city return a couple of weeks later to the reservation with tales of panic and chaos setting in. A white man, Justin Scott, who followed the snowmobile tracks of the two young men also turns up, as do some other white people. Scott is the story’s villain: he brings divisiveness, violence, and deceit to the village. In addition to the problems presented by this event (it is never explained why the power and all infrastructure has failed), the author also gives a nod to regular problems facing Indigenous populations in North America – alcohol and drug abuse, depression, suicide—although they take a back seat to the major plot of coping with diminishing resources. Interesting characters. ( )
  bschweiger | Feb 4, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Rice, Waubgeshigprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Merasty, BillyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
To my son, Jiikwis, who shines a bright and beautiful light on our future.
First words
A crack echoed through the boreal landscape, a momentary chaos in the still afternoon air.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"With winter looming, a small northern Anishinaabe community goes dark. Cut off, people become passive and confused. Panic builds as the food supply dwindles. While the band council and a pocket of community members struggle to maintain order, an unexpected visitor arrives, escaping the crumbling society to the south. Soon after, others follow. The community leadership loses its grip on power as the visitors manipulate the tired and hungry to take control of the reserve. Tensions rise and, as the months pass, so does the death toll due to sickness and despair. Frustrated by the building chaos, a group of young friends and their families turn to the land and Anishinaabe tradition in hopes of helping their community thrive again. Guided through the chaos by an unlikely leader named Evan Whitesky, they endeavor to restore order while grappling with a grave decision."--

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.77)
0.5
1
1.5
2 12
2.5 5
3 54
3.5 22
4 79
4.5 15
5 38

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 205,997,435 books! | Top bar: Always visible