HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Gods, Graves & Scholars: The Story of…
Loading...

Gods, Graves & Scholars: The Story of Archaeology (1949)

by C. W. Ceram

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,679206,339 (4.12)30

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 30 mentions

English (13)  Spanish (6)  Italian (1)  All languages (20)
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
C.W. Ceram visualized archeology as a wonderful combination of high adventure, romance, history and scholarship, and this book, a chronicle of man's search for his past, reads like a dramatic narrative. We travel with Heinrich Schliemann as, defying the ridicule of the learned world, he actually unearths the remains of the ancient city of Troy. We share the excitement of Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter as they first glimpse the riches of Tutankhamen's tomb, of George Smith when he found the ancient clay tablets that contained the records of the Biblical Flood. We rediscover the ruined splendors of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the wonders of the ancient wold; of Chichen Itza, the abandoned pyramids of the Maya: and the legendary Labyrinth of tile Minotaur in Crete. Here is much of the history of civilization and the stories of the men who rediscovered it.
  Cultural_Attache | Jul 13, 2018 |
Interesting book! I learned some things I hadn't known, and details about things I had known. There were also some interesting sidelights on matters - Ceram's attitude towards the early history-hunters (not archaeologists, the ones who were just looking for neat stuff to take back to their countries) is interestingly in-between their own attitudes and how things are thought about today. I was wincing through his whole description of Schleimann's burrowing through the mound of Troy - while he looked for "interesting" things and gold, he was destroying huge amounts of data on the other cities and cultures that had inhabited the same place. The diggers in Babylon were a _little_ more careful, but only a little. And Ceram's views of Cortez and the other Spanish explorers/invaders of the New World were also much more approving than nowadays. Though he did point out some of the reasons for their insistence on "converting the heathens", and their inability to understand that they were dealing with another civilized people (not that that stopped Europeans from imposing their religion on others, anyway - Thirty Years War, anyone?). The level of detail varied considerably - Cortez and Carter we got specific events, with the early Egyptologists and explorers of Babylon and the associated cultures it's much more of an overview with occasional more-detailed descriptions of certain events. Overall, interesting, I'm glad I read it, and I doubt I'll ever want to reread. ( )
1 vote jjmcgaffey | Oct 26, 2017 |
I first read this book in primary school, maybe sixth or seventh grade. I guess you could say it had an influence on me. I became an ancient history major.
I fell in love with archaeology reading this book, and even now, in my own novels, I rely on ancient history and myths for topics and allusions as great source material.
I still pull my rather yellowed-paged copy off my bookshelf and re-read it about every ten years. I can forgive the mistakes in archaeology; we always learn new information as time goes on. But Mr. Ceram did something that most of us on this website love to see: he sparked a kid's imagination with a book and that, in my opinion, is an almost holy thing. ( )
  AJUllman | Sep 19, 2017 |
Best book on early archaeology. This is a fascinating study of 19th century discoveries and there are some 20th century discoveries. ( )
  jerry-book | Jan 26, 2016 |
Edition: // Descr: xi, 426 p. : ill.,plates, maps 22 cm. // Series: Call No. { 913 C33 } Translated from the German by E.B. Garside Contains Chronological Tables, Bibliography, and Index. // //
  ColgateClassics | Oct 26, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (21 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ceram, C. W.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bianchi Bandinelli, RanuccioForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Garside, E.B.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vlad Borrelli, LiciaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilkins, SophieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
C.W. Ceram visualized archeology as a wonderful combination of high adventure, romance, history and scholarship, and this book, a chronicle of man's search for his past, reads like a dramatic narrative. We travel with Heinrich Schliemann as, defying the ridicule of the learned world, he actually unearths the remains of the ancient city of Troy. We share the excitement of Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter as they first glimpse the riches of Tutankhamen's tomb, of George Smith when he found the ancient clay tablets that contained the records of the Biblical Flood. We rediscover the ruined splendors of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the wonders of the ancient wold; of Chichen Itza, the abandoned pyramids of the Maya: and the legendary Labyrinth of tile Minotaur in Crete. Here is much of the history of civilization and the stories of the men who rediscovered it.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0394743199, Mass Market Paperback)

C.W. Ceram visualized archeology as a wonderful combination of high adventure, romance, history and scholarship, and this book, a chronicle of man's search for his past, reads like a dramatic narrative. We travel with Heinrich Schliemann as, defying the ridicule of the learned world, he actually unearths the remains of the ancient city of Troy. We share the excitement of Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter as they first glimpse the riches of Tutankhamen's tomb, of George Smith when he found the ancient clay tablets that contained the records of the Biblical Flood. We rediscover the ruined splendors of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the wonders of the ancient wold; of Chichen Itza, the abandoned pyramids of the Maya: and the legendary Labyrinth of tile Minotaur in Crete. Here is much of the history of civilization and the stories of the men who rediscovered it.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:58 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.12)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 5
2.5 1
3 30
3.5 10
4 67
4.5 10
5 71

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 131,697,404 books! | Top bar: Always visible