HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher (1994)

by Richard Feynman

Other authors: Edward Hutchings (Editor), Robert B. Leighton (Editor), Matthew L. Sands (Editor)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,861383,183 (4.09)36
"It was Feynman's outrageous and scintillating method of teaching that earned him legendary status among students and professors of physics. From 1961 to 1963, Feynman delivered a series of lectures at the California Institute of Technology that revolutionized the teaching of physics around the world. 'Six Not-So-Easy Pieces', taken from these famous 'Lectures on Physics' represent some the most stimulating material from the series. In these classic lessons, Feynman introduces the general reader to the following topics: atoms, basic physics, energy, gravitation, quantum mechanics, and the relationship of physics to other topics ..."--Page 4 of cover.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 36 mentions

English (34)  Danish (2)  Spanish (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (38)
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
This will override my last review.
  sgward | Jul 16, 2023 |
This book is a bit dated in its physics, but more dated in its presentation. Six "easy" lectures culled from a series Feynman gave in 1963-64 don't come across as well on the page, and compared to a physics lecture as part of a Great Courses series, the diagrams just don't do the trick. They need animation to make themselves clear, for instance. Nor is Feynman on paper as interesting as when you can listen to him talk. I'm not saying this is bad--it certainly isn't, but these days there are a lot more interesting ways to learn about physics. ( )
  datrappert | May 20, 2023 |
These essays are, indeed, "easy" in the sense of digestible, and while not overly technical they also do not dumb down the material. Feynman provides an admirable focus and distillation of familiar facts into a single vision, and the essays will reward re-reading.

I had to accept as correct some dynamics and relations beyond my grasp, and similarly some given mathematical expressions I can't follow without textual commentary. But Feynman's ability to get the pith of the matter, and to translate into familiar physical situations, is remarkable. He also does well to identify limits of knowledge, and briefly interrogate context such as historically why something is known in the form it is.

Upon finishing, resolved to look into his other science writing: Character of Science, or even the Lectures, and again, if reading the "memoir" material at all, use it as a "warm up" to the science. Feynman's curiosity about life seems identical to his approach to science: the wonder, the glee in debunking confusion or tricking others based on their lack of understanding, in good fun. This sense of wonder and merriment also is evident from the science writings alone, but keeping it in mind helps clarify how and what he focuses on with respect to the facts.

Completed in two sittings, one day, immediately following completion of Surely You're Joking, Mr Feynman!. Joking proved a good intro, the jocularity and joy of the lectures were accentuated knowing of his impish humour and thorough-going curiosity in how the world works. I suspect his delivery, when witnessed in person, made this quite obvious, but on the page the transcripts were not always so self-evident without knowing of his personality. ( )
  elenchus | Nov 7, 2022 |
a recap of things I already knew in physics. ( )
  MadMattReader | Sep 11, 2022 |
I'm only halfway through but I know I'm gonna enjoy this all. ( )
  DaVarPhi | Aug 18, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (16 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Richard Feynmanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hutchings, EdwardEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Leighton, Robert B.Editorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sands, Matthew L.Editorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bridge, AndyCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davies, PaulIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goodstein, David L.Prefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hibbs, Albert R.Forewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neugebauer, GerryPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Servidei, LauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stoddart, JimCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
This two-year course in physics is presented from the point of view that you, the reader, are going to be a physicist.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

"It was Feynman's outrageous and scintillating method of teaching that earned him legendary status among students and professors of physics. From 1961 to 1963, Feynman delivered a series of lectures at the California Institute of Technology that revolutionized the teaching of physics around the world. 'Six Not-So-Easy Pieces', taken from these famous 'Lectures on Physics' represent some the most stimulating material from the series. In these classic lessons, Feynman introduces the general reader to the following topics: atoms, basic physics, energy, gravitation, quantum mechanics, and the relationship of physics to other topics ..."--Page 4 of cover.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Le lezioni di fisica di Feynman sono ormai leggendarie per la loro perspicuità ed efficacia. Quelle che qui presentiamo sono le prime (saranno seguite da Sei pezzi meno facili) e partono da zero. Nel primo «pezzo», dopo una breve introduzione ai metodi e al significato della ricerca – tre paginette che valgono intere biblioteche di testi epistemologici –, si dice di che cos’è fatta la materia che cade sotto i nostri sensi: atomi in moto. Nel secondo si spiega che non tutto è così limpido come sembra, e che nella materia c’è anche dell’altro: il mondo quantistico e i suoi paradossi. Senza addentrarsi in una ricostruzione storica, Feynman riesce tuttavia a darci il senso dell’evolversi della fisica nel secolo appena trascorso, mettendone in luce i legami con le altre scienze. Gli ultimi tre saggi selezionano altrettanti capisaldi (energia, gravitazione, la realtà quantistica), presentati a livelli di complessità crescente: a ogni lettura cade una buccia della magica cipolla e si apre un nuovo, affascinante scenario. Chi prevedesse di naufragare su un’isola deserta, e volesse esser certo di avere con sé l’essenziale di quel che sappiamo sul mondo fisico, potrà mettere nello zaino i Sei pezzi facili.
(piopas)
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.09)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 8
2.5 2
3 84
3.5 18
4 179
4.5 24
5 146

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 204,770,218 books! | Top bar: Always visible