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Brain Wave by Poul Anderson
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Brain Wave (1954)

by Poul Anderson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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6561821,830 (3.54)1 / 35
Recently added byprivate library, aztwinmom, Jean_Sexton, Honyasbookshelf, robnbrwn, BriainC, jigarpatel, ibinu
  1. 20
    The Tommyknockers by Stephen King (jseger9000)
    jseger9000: King references Brain Wave in The Tommyknockers and with good reasons. Both books deal (in part) with people whose intelligence is suddenly and unexpectedly increased dramatically.
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English (17)  Danish (1)  All languages (18)
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
Fun read about a world where suddenly every creature becomes a factor more intelligent. More than science this novel is about culture and society. How do animals of varying intelligence, and humans from different backgrounds, react? How does this change the relationship between humans and animals? Does civilized society become more structured or disordered? What happens to science, philosophy and religion?

These are the questions Brain Wave asks, and they are important ones. At less than 200 pages and always captivating, this novel could easily have been extended. As it is, I still consider it a remarkable work by a great storyteller. ( )
  jigarpatel | Apr 9, 2019 |
I read this many years ago during a week-long vacation at my grandma's, and I recall sneaking out every afternoon to the library to read another chapter or two. I was a teenager, so I can't vouch for the quality of the writing with my current understanding, but I can say that the core of the story has remained with me until today, and every now and then I recall aspects of it. It was a fascinating read.

If a more modern reference may help others what to expect, I could say that the short story "Understand" by Ted Chiang (of "Story of Your Life"/"Arrival" fame) was quite reminiscent of this book, for me. ( )
  Waldir | Jun 12, 2018 |
I thought this was a book from the late 70's and was surprised to find it dates originally to 1954. The concept of the story is really out there - all life on earth has had intelligence suppressed because of a field the solar system has been passing through while we rotate around the galaxy. Now we are moving out of it and then, one day, it no longer is influencing the planet. This is intelligently written science fiction from the golden age. The story clearly is set in the 50's and it feels 50ish but tries I think to rise above that to a more modern way - the 50's elements seen from now are like reading historical fiction whereas the story itself tries to stretch to bigger ideas. It can't quite do that since among other things it has a guy smoking a cigar on a starship.

The story plays out better than I expected as mankind worldwide (and animalkind worldwide!) deals with a huge growing boost in intelligence. There was a lot of gobbledygook here and there and the attempts for a scientific explanation of why intelligence had been suppressed was pretty silly to me. What I liked were some of the personal stories of how people reacted to a changed mental state and how the world was going to change. This part of the book, the bulk of it, was hit and miss - the story revolving around the man attempting to keep running a farm I liked a lot - glimpses of other people were intriguing - the New York City stuff, and the central focus on a particular scientist pretty much not interesting at all.

We could have a lot of fun with animals throwing off the yoke and taking on man. There is a bit of fun like that but the story primarily goes other ways. So there's no rise of the rats, or insect takeovers or good dogs gone bad. This book gets an OK from me. I did like the ending. ( )
  RBeffa | Jun 15, 2016 |
The blurb on the front cover of the paperback version reads "A panoramic story of what happens to a world gone super intelligent!". That sums the basic premise up so perfectly it is worth repeating.

I love high concepts, they save me from struggling to write an accurate synopsis. Brain Wave is about every living creature in the world suddenly having their intellect more than quadrupled. Such a deceptively simple premise, it seems like anybody can write a story about this. However, Poul Anderson is one of sf's all time greats, and here he managed to spin out a lot of imaginative yet entirely believable ramifications from such an event.

Referring back to that aforementioned blurb again the "panoramic story" part refers to a multiple viewpoints structure which allows the author to create a detailed post-IQ boost world. Here Anderson focuses on a wide range of people, among them some scientists, a house wife, a simple farmhand, and some monkeys. Super intellect - as it turns out - is not desirable for everyone, a lot of people go insane from suddenly thinking and perceiving too much. People who holds menial jobs now find repetition and lack of challenge intolerable so they quit in droves. While this is not a post apocalypse world it does have a similar feel to it, with government breaking down, people deserting their jobs, and pigs attacking people!

This is a very short novel (175 pages) so not a lot of time is spent on character development, I do like the farmhand plot strand though, it has a [b:Flowers for Algernon|18373|Flowers for Algernon|Daniel Keyes|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1327870353s/18373.jpg|3337594] vibe to it (without the tragic ending). The average housewife's story is also poignant. Andersen's prose is as highly readable as ever, his science background is once again put to good use. I like his explanation (not infodump) of how this Brain Wave came about, for [b:Tau Zero|240617|Tau Zero|Poul Anderson|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1173036940s/240617.jpg|598009] fans (often cited as Anderson's best book) there is a little subplot that does something different with the runaway spaceship idea.

This is an excellent little book, well worth anybody's time. It may not actually boost your intelligence but may give it a wee nudge in the right direction! ( )
1 vote apatt | Dec 26, 2015 |
This book may be dated but its questions are not. ( )
  Gregorio_Roth | Dec 5, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Poul Andersonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Aldiss, Brian WIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kirkland,PhilCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lehr, PaulCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Powers, Richard M.Cover Artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sannes, SanneCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weerlee, Duco vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
White, TimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345325214, Mass Market Paperback)

For millions of years, the part of the galaxy containing our solar system has been moving through a vast force field that has been inhibiting certain electromagnetic and electrochemical processes and, thus, certain neurotic functions. When Earth escapes the inhibiting field, synapse speed immediately increases, causing a rise in intelligence, which results in a transfigured humanity reaching for the stars, leaving behind our earth to the less intelligent humans and animal life-forms. This is a transcendent look at the possible effects of enhanced intelligence on our planet.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:53 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

For millions of years, the part of the galaxy containing our solar system has been moving through a vast force field that has been inhibiting certain electromagnetic and electrochemical processes and, thus, certain neurotic functions. When Earth escapes the inhibiting field, synapse speed immediately increases, causing a rise in intelligence, which results in a transfigured humanity reaching for the stars, leaving behind our earth to the less intelligent humans and animal life-forms. This is a transcendent look at the possible effects of enhanced intelligence on our planet.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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