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God in the Dock: Essays on Theology and Ethics

by C. S. Lewis

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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2,57874,893 (4.11)22
God in the Dock contains forty-eight essays and twelve letters written by Lewis between 1940 and 1963 on such topics as good and evil, miracles, theism, vivisection, the role of women in church polity, and ethics and politics. Many represent Lewis's first ventures into themes later treated in full-length books.… (more)
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» See also 22 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
Another collection of essays on theology. There are 13 essays in about 100 pages, so they’re all pretty short and to the point which makes for easy reading. ( )
  vvbooklady | Jan 1, 2022 |
Drawn from a variety of sources, the essays were designed to meet a variety of needs, and among other accomplishments they serve to illustrate the many different angles from which we are able to view the Christian religion. They range from relatively popular pieces written for newspapers to more learned defenses of the faith which first appeared in The Socratic Digest. Characterized by Lewis's honesty and realism, his insight and conviction, and above all his thoroughgoing commitments to Christianity, these essays make God in the Dock very much a book for our time.
  StFrancisofAssisi | Apr 30, 2019 |
Ethics
  CPI | Aug 8, 2016 |
Before I discovered Adrian Plass and Philip Yancey, CS Lewis was unquestionably my favourite Christian author. He still ranks as one of my top three. For apologetics and clear explanations of doctrine, I don't think he has any equal.

However this particular book isn't one of his best. To be fair, it was never intended as a book. It's a collection of Lewis's articles and talks on various topics, which don't really hold together. The chapters are short, and I enjoy his intellectual but clear style of writing.

There were some gems in the early sections, but I was less impressed with some of the later chapters which displayed distinct upper-middle-class 1940s bias.

All in all, not a good introduction to CS Lewis, but a nice addition for a collector of his works. ( )
  SueinCyprus | Jan 26, 2016 |
Entertaining as always, though his piece on women as priests is rather poorly argued. ( )
  JohnNebauer | Nov 7, 2008 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
C. S. Lewisprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hooper, WalterEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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God in the Dock contains forty-eight essays and twelve letters written by Lewis between 1940 and 1963 on such topics as good and evil, miracles, theism, vivisection, the role of women in church polity, and ethics and politics. Many represent Lewis's first ventures into themes later treated in full-length books.

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FROM THE BACK COVER:

"Captivating reading that builds the faith while it fills the mind with greatness."

-SHERWOOD E. WIRT, Editor, DECISION.

"Lewis struck me as the most thoroughly converted man I ever met," observes Walter Hooper in the preface to this new collection of essays by C. S. Lewis. "His whole vision of life was such that the natural and the supernatural seemed inseparably combined." It -is precisely this pervasive Christianity which is demonstrated anew in the 48 essays comprising God in the Dock. Here Lewis addresses himself both to theological questions and to those which Hooper terms "semitheological," or ethical. But whether he is discussing "Evil and God," "Miracles," "The Decline of Religion," or "The Humanitarian Theory of Punishment," his insight and observations are thoroughly and profoundly Christian.

These essays and letters were written over a twenty-four-year period, and almost all of them are published here in book form for the first time. (One, on "Christian Apologetics," has never before been published in any form.) Since the articles appeared originally in a number of different periodicals, however, they will be completely new to the majority of readers.

Drawn from a wide variety of sources, the essays were designed to meet a variety of needs, and among other accomplishments they serve to illustrate the many different angles from which we are able to view the Christian Religion. They range from relatively popular pieces written for newspapers to more learned defenses of the Faith which first appeared in The Socratic Digest. Nevertheless, says Hooper, "all share a particuar seriousness. Not 'gloominess,' for they sparkle with wit and common sense; but 'seriousness' because of the high stakes which Lewis believed were involved in being a man."

The stakes involved in being a man are as high today as they have ever been. These essays, characterized by Lewis's honesty and realism, his insight and conviction, above all by his thoroughgoing commitments to Christianity, make God in the Dock very much a book for our time.

Walter Hooper, a long-time friend and for some years personal secretary of C. S. Lewis, is the editor of an earlier collection of Lewis essays entitled Christian Reflections.
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