HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Miracles (1947)

by C. S. Lewis

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,047251,640 (3.94)33
"The central miracle asserted by Christians is the Incarnation. They say that God became Man. Every other miracle prepares the way for this, or results from this." This is the key statement of Miracles, in which C. S. Lewis shows that a Christian must not only accept but rejoice in miracles as a testimony of the unique personal involvement of God in his creation. Using his characteristic lucidity and wit to develop his argument, Lewis challenges the rationalists, agnostics, and deists on their own grounds and provides a poetic and joyous affirmation that miracles really do occur in our everyday lives.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 33 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
WITHDRAWN: GIVEN TO KIMBERLEY TURNER SEPT. 2020
  misterehmuseseh | Sep 15, 2020 |
In the classic Miracles, C.S. Lewis, the most important Christian writer of the 20th century, argues that a Christian must not only accept but rejoice in miracles as a testimony of the unique personal involvement of God in his creation.
  StFrancisofAssisi | Mar 11, 2020 |
Great primer, but not a philosophical treatise. Lewis approaches the issue of miraculous activity and provides the categories to think of divine acts, not as violations of Nature but as supersessions of it. Chapter 3 outlines the kernel of what Plantinga has developed into the Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism. Expect Lewis's signature conversational tone and illuminative metaphors, but don't look for technical precision or airtight argumentation. A great primer, but don't stop here.

Content: 3.5/5
Style: 5/5
Overall: 4.2/5

Assessment: highly recommend to someone new to the topic, experienced readers will find the style refreshing but the content shallow ( )
  ZacharyTLawson | Jul 10, 2019 |
In the classic Miracles, C.S. Lewis, the most important Christian writer of the 20th century, argues that a Christian must not only accept but rejoice in miracles as a testimony of the unique personal involvement of God in his creation.
  StFrancisofAssisi | Apr 28, 2019 |
This book is part of my C.S. Lewis collection. I went through a huge phase where I was just obsessed with anything and everything by him. While I don't agree with all of his theology, I do love his writing style and the things he has to say about faith. He was a good one. ( )
  justagirlwithabook | Jul 31, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lewis, C. S.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rhind-Tutt, JulianNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Cecil and Daphne Harwood
First words
In all my life I have met only one person who claims to have seen a ghost.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

"The central miracle asserted by Christians is the Incarnation. They say that God became Man. Every other miracle prepares the way for this, or results from this." This is the key statement of Miracles, in which C. S. Lewis shows that a Christian must not only accept but rejoice in miracles as a testimony of the unique personal involvement of God in his creation. Using his characteristic lucidity and wit to develop his argument, Lewis challenges the rationalists, agnostics, and deists on their own grounds and provides a poetic and joyous affirmation that miracles really do occur in our everyday lives.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.94)
0.5 1
1 5
1.5
2 14
2.5 2
3 78
3.5 13
4 148
4.5 9
5 106

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Ediciones Encuentro

2 editions of this book were published by Ediciones Encuentro.

Editions: 8474909937, 8474902789

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,214,138 books! | Top bar: Always visible