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Miracles (1947)

by C. S. Lewis

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,491331,621 (3.92)34
As part of the repackaged and rebranded C.S. Lewis Signature Classic range, this title in which Lewis answers the question, 'Do miracles really happen?' will have obvious appeal to the growing spirituality market. 'The central miracle asserted by Christians is the Incarnation. They say that God became Man. Every other miracle prepares the way for this, or results from this.' This is the key statement of Miracles, in which C. S. Lewis shows that a Christian must not only accept but rejoice in miracles as a testimony of the unique personal involvement of God in his creation. Using his characteristic lucidity and wit to develop his argument, Lewis challenges the rationalists and cynics who are mired in their lack of imagination and provides a poetic and joyous affirmation that miracles really fo occur in our everyday lives.… (more)
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» See also 34 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
One of his more popular works, but not very read of his most popular works. Very insightful book that spends so much time leading up to the disucssion of miracles that by the time you get there you feel the argument has already been won.
  JourneyPC | Sep 26, 2022 |
Includes index
  TorontoOratorySPN | Sep 1, 2022 |
I enjoyed this book; Lewis does a reasonable job of presenting his arguments as to why theism is reasonable, why miracles are reasonable, and what criteria can be used for judging miracle. My main annoyance with the book is that Lewis tends to reason along the lines of "A or B, we don't like A, therefore B". For example, he makes a good case that either (a) there must be some sort of supernatural being representative of truth or (b) everything we believe to be true is just a vastly convenient fiction. He then goes on the claim the former as being the true solution even though the later is equally likely, just less comforting.

Lewis also has a tendency to define terms to suit his needs. He defines Naturalism as, amongst other things, being deterministic. Thus, he can appeal to our sense of the fitness of things to argue for theism; for example, at one point he says something like "if Naturalism is true, you are only reading this book and I am only writing it because of some inevitable chain of events". At another time, he claims that quantum mechanics cannot really be part of nature because it admits nondeterminism. Another way to interpret these limitations of his definition is to wonder, as I did, whether his definition of Naturalism might not just be pure rhetorical BS. Lewis does better in the later parts of the books when he switches to arguments that are just as rational as before but drops the claim to be proving anything.
  eri_kars | Jul 10, 2022 |
Very philosophical, ad you would expect from a book about miracles. He talks about the likelihood and nature both of miracles in general and those specific to the Christian faith.
Many if his points were abstract. I could grasp them if I had a quiet room and really focused. Not very helpful to your daily life, predictably, but informative and beneficial to those who enjoy pondering such things. ( )
  Michael_J | Jun 2, 2022 |
On whether miracles are really possible. My dad read this before I did and he told me there was a lot of unnecessary rambling in the middle chapters, but it started getting back on track toward the end. To my amusement, I discovered that the chapter in the exact middle of the book is, in fact, titled “A Chapter Not Strictly Necessary.” And I agree with my dad’s assessment; Lewis spends a lot of time discussing nature, materialism vs. spiritualism, rational thought, and the laws of physics (from a philosophical angle, not a scientific one), all of which he uses as building blocks for his argument about miracles but which I found difficult to follow a lot of the time. Eventually he does get around to talking about miracles, and biblical miracles specifically. ( )
  vvbooklady | Jan 1, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lewis, C. S.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rhind-Tutt, JulianNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In all my life I have met only one person who claims to have seen a ghost.
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As part of the repackaged and rebranded C.S. Lewis Signature Classic range, this title in which Lewis answers the question, 'Do miracles really happen?' will have obvious appeal to the growing spirituality market. 'The central miracle asserted by Christians is the Incarnation. They say that God became Man. Every other miracle prepares the way for this, or results from this.' This is the key statement of Miracles, in which C. S. Lewis shows that a Christian must not only accept but rejoice in miracles as a testimony of the unique personal involvement of God in his creation. Using his characteristic lucidity and wit to develop his argument, Lewis challenges the rationalists and cynics who are mired in their lack of imagination and provides a poetic and joyous affirmation that miracles really fo occur in our everyday lives.

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Lewis answers the question, 'Do miracles really happen?' will have obvious appeal to the growing spirituality market. 'The central miracle asserted by Christians is the Incarnation. They say that God became Man. Every other miracle prepares the way for this, or results from this.' This is the key statement of Miracles, in which C. S. Lewis shows that a Christian must not only accept but rejoice in miracles as a testimony of the unique personal involvement of God in his creation. Using his characteristic lucidity and wit to develop his argument, Lewis challenges the rationalists and cynics who are mired in their lack of imagination and provides a poetic and joyous affirmation that miracles really fo occur in our everyday lives.
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Ediciones Encuentro

2 editions of this book were published by Ediciones Encuentro.

Editions: 8474909937, 8474902789

 

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