HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Upturned Earth

by Karen Jennings

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
532,501,858 (3.67)None
Fiction. UPTURNED EARTH is set in Namaqualand, the copper mining district of the Cape Colony, during the winter of 1886. William Hull arrives at the town to take up the position of magistrate, a position that no one else wanted to accept because of the bleak and depressing locale. He finds that the town is run by the Cape Copper Mining Company and the despotic mine superintendent, Townsend. Meanwhile, Molefi Noki, a Xhosa mining labourer, is intent on finding his brother who was sent to jail for drunkenness and has yet to be released. Set against the background of a diverse community, made up of white immigrants, indigenous people and descendants of Dutch men and native women, we are given insight into the daily life of a mining town and the exploitation of workers, harsh working conditions and deep-seated corruption that began with the start of commercial mining in South Africa in the 1850s and which continue until now. While UPTURNED EARTH is a novel about the past, its concerns are very much founded in the present. "A remarkable and moving book. Evocative of an era of raw possibility; unflinching as it traces the veins of violence that run through South Africa's bedrock to this day."�Henrietta Rose "A mythical tale of heart and soul, cruelty and courage, fear and redemption."�Joanne Hichens "Meticulously researched and grippingly told, this is an intensely human story that sheds light on a neglected corner of South African history."�Fiona Snyckers… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 3 of 3
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
The content of the story was interesting and told in an easy style. It allows the reader an understanding of the injustices forced upon the native inhabitants of the land by European colonists and the companies that usurped these lands from the natives and essentially enslaved them as laborers without much choice. It is infuriating how discrimination was introduced and thrust upon these people simply because their cultures, customs, lifestyles were different than the conquering Europeans. I found some of the characters relationships peculiar and dialogue a bit odd, but I think that is because it is written in a style that is depicting the character of the town during this time period. I would recommend to gain insight into the hardships forced upon natives and also to get some perspective into the opinions of the settlers. ( )
  Jewlzee | Oct 16, 2019 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
An interesting, meandering almost plotless tale, but one told with great style and colour.

Set in the late nineteenth century in Namaqualand, it what was then the Cape colony, and is now South Africa, it follows the life of a newly appointed resident magistrate, settling into life in the dry badlands of the Cape.

For the first half of the story, you expect it to be a gentle story of a forbidden between Hull, the magistrate, and Mrs McBride, a widow he meets on the coastal steamer from Cape Town.

But it’s more than that. A mine disaster and the discovery of quite ghastly mistreatment of indigenous workers in the mine jerks Hull out of his complacent study of entomology and strains his developing relationship with Mrs McBride.

The story is South African, but in truth it could be anywhere, it could equally be set in the desert mining towns of Australia or against the story of the Lena river gold miners in Tsarist Russia.

Hull’s awakening turns what at first seems a gentle story into something quite powerful.. ( )
  moncur_d | Sep 11, 2019 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This novel reflects the brutality and corruption of South African mining companies starting in the 1850s lasting till today.

The fictional story is based around a copper mine in Namaqualand where a new magistrate is trying to uphold the law against the rules of the Company doing all the business there.

While the almost starving copper miners are digging the tunnels of the mine abominable atrocities are come to surface.

Easy read echoing long gone labour exploitation to our days. ( )
  viennamax | Aug 7, 2019 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Fiction. UPTURNED EARTH is set in Namaqualand, the copper mining district of the Cape Colony, during the winter of 1886. William Hull arrives at the town to take up the position of magistrate, a position that no one else wanted to accept because of the bleak and depressing locale. He finds that the town is run by the Cape Copper Mining Company and the despotic mine superintendent, Townsend. Meanwhile, Molefi Noki, a Xhosa mining labourer, is intent on finding his brother who was sent to jail for drunkenness and has yet to be released. Set against the background of a diverse community, made up of white immigrants, indigenous people and descendants of Dutch men and native women, we are given insight into the daily life of a mining town and the exploitation of workers, harsh working conditions and deep-seated corruption that began with the start of commercial mining in South Africa in the 1850s and which continue until now. While UPTURNED EARTH is a novel about the past, its concerns are very much founded in the present. "A remarkable and moving book. Evocative of an era of raw possibility; unflinching as it traces the veins of violence that run through South Africa's bedrock to this day."�Henrietta Rose "A mythical tale of heart and soul, cruelty and courage, fear and redemption."�Joanne Hichens "Meticulously researched and grippingly told, this is an intensely human story that sheds light on a neglected corner of South African history."�Fiona Snyckers

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.67)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5
4
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,536,477 books! | Top bar: Always visible