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Laughter in the Dark by Vladimir Nabokov
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Laughter in the Dark (1932)

by Vladimir Nabokov

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 24 mentions

English (25)  Hebrew (1)  French (1)  All languages (27)
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
و گفتني، چه بهتر از اين كه اغلب پايان ِ باز منجر به نوشتاري آشفته مي شود و خواننده را پس مي زند اما انتخاب زاويه ديد درست براي پايان داستان (زاويه ديد:‌مرد كوري كه اسلحه به دست براي انتقام آمده است) هم پايان را باز مي گذارد و هم فرود ِ نهايي (كادانس) را سر و ساماني چنان مي دهد كه خواننده كتاب را ببندد و بگويد آفرين

مانند لوليتا شخصيت هايي با پرداخت بسيار موفق،‌استفاده هاي به جا از شگردها كه اين آخري از داستان نويسي چون او بر آمدني است كه تسلط بي چون و چرا به نقد ادبي نيز دارد . گرچه شخصيت ها و پيرنگ و باقي سازه هاي داستان كم شباهت به لوليتا نيست ( )
  MasoudBorbor | Jan 8, 2018 |
Excellent story, well written, great characters. ( )
  cakecop | Nov 23, 2017 |
Wow....enjoyed this way more than i expected! However, it was sort of like watching a horrible train wreck in slow motion.....but it was enticing enough that i thought it cannot continue to go this way....something's gotta give....so i just kept vigorously plowing through.....waiting, hoping......but without giving this away, i was a little surprised by the ending. This is a study of strength & weakness, putting things off so much, there is no ability to go back......a story of pathetic manipulation......and one that is sadly far too common still in today's society.......Emptiness = bad..... recommended if you can handle a little 'dark'. ( )
  jeffome | Sep 6, 2017 |
Once upon a time there lived in Berlin, Germany, a man called Albinus. He was rich, respectable, happy; one day he abandoned his wife for the sake of a youthful mistress; he loved; was not loved; and his life ended in disaster.

Prior to this novel, I was reading Munro which got me thinking about the succinctness of the short story form. Most novels can be condensed into short stories (and some for the better!) but some books I read as much for the writing as for the plot.

And this was exactly the case with this novel. Nabokov may have summarised his entire plot in the first paragraph but with that prose - you can almost feel the relish with which he must have chosen/written every word -, I could've easily read a few hundred more pages of it.

I was actually confused about the vibrancy and luxuriousness of the writing because it was clear that the story was originally in another language but how was the translator able to capture exactly how I imagine Nabokov would have written the book if he wrote it in English, knowing what little I know of him from Lolita. It turns out that was exactly what happened: According to a New Yorker article, displeased with the original translation, Nabokov re-"translated" his story from Russian and made structural edits to it along the way, so in a sense, his English translation is probably the best version of this story.

This was only my second Nabokov, after Lolita. Dark comedy and a real love of the English language seem to be his forte, but I sure hope the middle-aged men lusting after pubescent girls is not a recurring theme in his other books. ( )
  kitzyl | Jun 24, 2017 |
is the cover on this page correct? my 89 viking international paperback copy has a different image, but same publication specs
  ornithopolis | Mar 19, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (22 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Nabokov, VladimirAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Banville, JohnIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bergsma, Petersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nabokov, VladimirTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Once upon a time there lived in Berlin, Germany, a man called Albinus.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0811216748, Paperback)

The classic novel from the author of Lolita, brilliantly portraying one man's ruin through love and betrayal.

"Once upon a time there lived in Berlin, Germany, a man called Albinus. He was rich, respectable, happy; one day he abandoned his wife for the sake of a youthful mistress; he loved; was not loved; and his life ended in disaster." Thus begins Vladimir Nabokov's Laughter in the Dark; this, the author tells us, is the whole story—except that he starts from here, with his characteristic dazzling skill and irony, and brilliantly turns a fable into a chilling, original novel of folly and destruction. Amidst a Weimar-era milieu of silent film stars, artists, and aspirants, Nabokov creates a merciless masterpiece as Albinus, an aging critic, falls prey to his own desires, to his teenage mistress, and to Axel Rex, the scheming rival for her affections who finds his greatest joy in the downfall of others.

Published first in Russian as Kamera Obskura in 1932, this book appeared in Nabokov's own English translation six years later. This New Directions edition, based on the text as Nabokov revised it in 1960, features a new introduction by Booker Prize-winner John Banville.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:20 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

"Once upon a time there lived in Berlin, Germany, a man called Albinus. He was rich, respectable, happy; one day he abandoned his wife for the sake of a youthful mistress; he loved; was not loved; and his life ended in disaster." Thus begins Vladimir Nabokov'sLaughter in the Dark; this, the author tells us, is the whole story--except that he starts from here, with his characteristic dazzling skill and irony, and brilliantly turns a fable into a chilling, original novel of folly and destruction. Amidst a Weimar-era milieu of silent film stars, artists, and aspirants, Nabokov creates a merciless masterpiece as Albinus, an aging critic, falls prey to his own desires, to his teenage mistress, and to Axel Rex, the scheming rival for her affections who finds his greatest joy in the downfall of others. Published first in Russian asKamera Obskura in 1932, this book appeared in Nabokov's own English translation six years later. This New Directions edition, based on the text as Nabokov revised it in 1960, features a new introduction by Booker Prize-winner John Banville.… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141186526, 0141196955

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