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The Spanish Labyrinth: An Account of the Social and Political Background…

by Gerald Brenan

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319465,293 (3.56)4
Gerald Brenan's The Spanish Labyrinth has become the classic account of the background to the Spanish Civil War. Written during and immediately after the Civil War, this book has all the vividness of the author's experience. It represents a struggle to see the issues in Spanish politics objectively, whilst bearing witness to the deep involvement which is the only possible source of much of this richly detailed account. As a literary figure on the fringe of the Bloomsbury group, Gerald Brenan lends to this narrative an engaging personal style that has become familiar to many thousands of readers over the decades since it was first published.… (more)
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English (2)  Spanish (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (4)
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2370 The Spanish Labyrinth: An Account of the Social and Political Background of the Civil War, by Gerald Brenan (read 23 Mar 1991) This is a study of the social and political background to the Spanish Civil War, and has only a chapter--called an epilogue--on the war itself. I did not like the book, not because it was not pro-Franco (it is also not pro-Communist) but because of gratuitous anti-Catholic remarks. Obviously the Church in Spain has dark sides in its past, but some of the author's remarks show his anti-Catholic bias. The book is obviously well-researched, but I suspect there is some bias in his treatment of figures on the right in Spain before 1936 as well. But the book does leave me with a much clearer idea of Spanish history in the years before 1936. Brenan treats church-burnings and priests' and nuns' executions as just kind of a trait of Spaniards, rather than an impious evil--he tells his English readers to think of English atrocities against Catholics and so not to be so condemnatory! ( )
3 vote Schmerguls | May 20, 2008 |
a classic but not easy read ( )
  robertg69 | Feb 25, 2007 |
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Gerald Brenan's The Spanish Labyrinth has become the classic account of the background to the Spanish Civil War. Written during and immediately after the Civil War, this book has all the vividness of the author's experience. It represents a struggle to see the issues in Spanish politics objectively, whilst bearing witness to the deep involvement which is the only possible source of much of this richly detailed account. As a literary figure on the fringe of the Bloomsbury group, Gerald Brenan lends to this narrative an engaging personal style that has become familiar to many thousands of readers over the decades since it was first published.

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