HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Cairo Trilogy: Palace Walk, Palace of Desire, Sugar Street

by Naguib Mahfouz

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Cairo Trilogy (Omnibus 1-3)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,0701616,375 (4.33)1 / 171
nbsp; Naguib Mahfouz's magnificent epic trilogy of colonial Egypt appears here in one volume for the first time. The Nobel Prize--winning writer's masterwork is the engrossing story of a Muslim family in Cairo during Britain's occupation of Egypt in the early decades of the twentieth century. nbsp; The novels of The Cairo Trilogy trace three generations of the family of tyrannical patriarch Al-Sayyid Ahmad Abd al-Jawad, who rules his household with a strict hand while living a secret life of self-indulgence. Palace Walk introduces us to his gentle, oppressed wife, Amina, his cloistered daughters, Aisha and Khadija, and his three sons-the tragic and idealistic Fahmy, the dissolute hedonist Yasin, and the soul-searching intellectual Kamal. Al-Sayyid Ahmad's rebellious children struggle to move beyond his domination in Palace of Desire, as the world around them opens to the currents of modernity and political and domestic turmoil brought by the 1920s. Sugar Street brings Mahfouz's vivid tapestry of an evolving Egypt to a dramatic climax as the aging patriarch sees one grandson become a Communist, one a Muslim fundamentalist, and one the lover of a powerful politician. nbsp; Throughout the trilogy, the family's trials mirror those of their turbulent country during the years spanning the two World Wars, as change comes to a society that has resisted it for centuries. Filled with compelling drama, earthy humor, and remarkable insight, The Cairo Trilogy is the achievement of a master storyteller.… (more)
  1. 20
    East of Eden by John Steinbeck (paulkid)
    paulkid: These books are fathers-and-sons family epics that are set around the turn of the (20th) century. They both have philosophical and coming-of-age themes as well.
  2. 00
    A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth (chrisharpe)
  3. 00
    Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood by Fatima Mernissi (susanbooks)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

» See also 171 mentions

English (15)  French (1)  All languages (16)
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
The first book, Palace Walk, I reviewed alone. The next two books in the trilogy, Palace of Desire, and Sugar Street, aren't as good as the first book, imo. Palace of Desire covers the time frame when Kamal and the rest of his siblings are grown up, in their 20s. It's dominated by Kamal's lengthy inner conversations, mostly concerning his love for a girl named Aïsha, the sister of his classmate, who is extremely vain and conceited, and enjoys using Kamal to make a rich boy marry her quickly. Kamal suffers deeply from this, and the endless monologues with himself are tiring to Wade through. The father is his usual puto self, as in the first book, getting drunk every night and partying with sex workers, though he's now in his 50s.

Sugar Street is the last book of the trilogy, and covers the time when Kamal's siblings' children have become young adults. It's Also rather tiresome, as there are still lengthy monologues from Kamal talking to himself, and his nephews by his sister Khadija are also fond of lengthy inner conversations. Khadija has grown enormous, but her long-suffering mother Amina is withering away from a long life of being dominated under her "master" (her husband), who is finally suffering the ill effects of a lifetime of nightly partying. He's got crippling high blood pressure, and blocked arteries that are forcing his heart to work overtime. Quite satisfying to read of the downfall of this disgusting macho character. The writing is telling of Mahfouz's personality, and I suppose a part of it is infected by the times (early twentieth century through WWII). It's fascinating for its exploration of Egyptian culture. ( )
  burritapal | Oct 23, 2022 |
Here's what I wrote in 2008 about reading these works: "Wonderful books, with rich insights into Egyptian Muslim society. He (Al-Sayyid Ahmad Abd al-Jawad, the main character of Palace Walk and trilogy patriach) seemed a bit of a heavy-handed, selfish brute to MGA, but acknowledge the wide difference between our cultures. Memories of his wife, Amina, lovnig nothing more than being surrounded by her family at mealtimes, still linger. Read May - Aug, 2000. Should re-read some day." ( )
  MGADMJK | Sep 22, 2022 |
Palace Walk (book one) ( )
  MadMadMidge | Jan 26, 2022 |
Multi-generational story set in the early 1900's. Drama is quite soap opera esque, both character and historically driven. I think Tolstoy is a fair comparison for those aspects, lots of character hopping, very high emotions.

Obviously for it's setting and time period some of the characters can be quite uncomfortable to read. They are quiet on the extreme ends of their beliefs and social practices even for the time. I believe it is done to heighten the generational divides, and bring attention too how some of the events in the book effect the characters. There is rape and abuse shown from their perspectives, as well as the perspectives of other characters. The books certanly glorifies aspects of all this, not to say it isn't its own source of drama, or that is always shown positively. Still something to beware of if these are difficult subjects to read for you.

Also it's best to go in with some knowledge of the historical events the book is based around, or at least do some reading on the side. The family drama is far more in the forefront, so it often more references these things as they exist in the background of these characters lives, until something personally significant happens. ( )
  ProudPlatypus | Aug 20, 2020 |
Egypt as it was in all its bizarre wonder...[in progress]
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Naguib Mahfouzprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hafez, SabryIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hutchins, William MaynardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kenny, Lorne M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kenny, Olive E.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Samaan, Angele BotrosTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

nbsp; Naguib Mahfouz's magnificent epic trilogy of colonial Egypt appears here in one volume for the first time. The Nobel Prize--winning writer's masterwork is the engrossing story of a Muslim family in Cairo during Britain's occupation of Egypt in the early decades of the twentieth century. nbsp; The novels of The Cairo Trilogy trace three generations of the family of tyrannical patriarch Al-Sayyid Ahmad Abd al-Jawad, who rules his household with a strict hand while living a secret life of self-indulgence. Palace Walk introduces us to his gentle, oppressed wife, Amina, his cloistered daughters, Aisha and Khadija, and his three sons-the tragic and idealistic Fahmy, the dissolute hedonist Yasin, and the soul-searching intellectual Kamal. Al-Sayyid Ahmad's rebellious children struggle to move beyond his domination in Palace of Desire, as the world around them opens to the currents of modernity and political and domestic turmoil brought by the 1920s. Sugar Street brings Mahfouz's vivid tapestry of an evolving Egypt to a dramatic climax as the aging patriarch sees one grandson become a Communist, one a Muslim fundamentalist, and one the lover of a powerful politician. nbsp; Throughout the trilogy, the family's trials mirror those of their turbulent country during the years spanning the two World Wars, as change comes to a society that has resisted it for centuries. Filled with compelling drama, earthy humor, and remarkable insight, The Cairo Trilogy is the achievement of a master storyteller.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.33)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 19
3.5 5
4 47
4.5 14
5 70

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,200,339 books! | Top bar: Always visible