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Dune: Book 1 (2020)

by Brian Herbert, Kevin J Anderson

Other authors: Raúl Allén (Illustrator), Patricia Martín (Illustrator)

Series: Dune: The Graphic Novel (Book 1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1706132,847 (3.6)3
The first graphic novel adaptation of Dune, the groundbreaking science-fiction classic by Frank Herbert--now in a deluxe collector's edition   Dune, Frank Herbert's epic science-fiction masterpiece set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar society, tells the story of Paul Atreides as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis. A stunning blend of adventure and mysticism, environmentalism, and politics, Dune is a powerful, fantastical tale that takes an unprecedented look into our universe, and is transformed by the graphic novel format. Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's adaptation retains the integrity of the original novel, and Raúl Allén and Patricia Martín's magnificent illustrations, along with cover art by Bill Sienkiewicz, bring the book to life for a new generation of readers. A national bestseller, Dune: The Graphic Novel, is now available in a deluxe collector's edition with an increased trim size of 7 1/2" x 11 1/4", printed on high-quality matte art paper in a faux-cloth slipcase with gold foil stamping tip-on cover.… (more)
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» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Si has leido Dune ya:
- Como fan de Dune me ha hecho recordar tantas sensaciones, me ha encantado.

Si no has leido Dune ya:
- NO LO HAGAS. No leas esto. Es como leer un resumen de un libro, la trama esta ahi pero todo lo que hace a Dune interesante no! ( )
  trusmis | Sep 30, 2021 |
I don't know why I keep doing this to myself. Okay, well, I know, but I kinda don't know, either.

Here's the thing: I love the Dune series. I mean, after the first trilogy, it's definitely diminishing returns, but those first three books? Damn. I've read those first three at least four times, and each time, I get something new out of them.

Then, after Frank Herbert passed, his supremely untalented son Brian hooked up with Kevin J. Anderson, supreme hack, and then proceeded to crap all over Frank Herbert's legacy. Where Frank's writing was lyrical, philosophical, subtle, and carried various shades that hid layers of depth, Brian and Kevin just spit out on-the-nose dialogue, bland plots, with no depth. It's like getting Terry Brooks to add to Tolkien's Middle Earth saga. It's like getting James Patterson to write the sequel to any Cormac McCarthy novel. They'd both likely say yes, but the results would be ass.

So, now the dreadful duo take on distilling Frank's greatest novel down to a comic book script and find an art team that can do creative justice to all the wonderful things involved in building out the Dune universe.

And the results are, as per Brian and Kevin's standards, underwhelming.

The writing—and trust me, I understand what a daunting task it must be to turn this novel...even roughly a third of it...into a workable graphic novel—is stilted, with no subtlety. In short, standard
junior Herbert and Anderson fare. It's mostly banal.

As for the art, it's a bit better, but it feels like Raúl Allén is trying to ape Gabriel Rodriguez's style (likely most famous for his art in Locke & Key), while trying to be a bit less cartoony. But the static nine-panel page layout he favours does little to break the monotony.

Let's face it, Dune is a lot of talking, or a lot of explaining. I mean, Frank wasn't your typical action-sequence writer, and the bigass battle he leads to at the end of the book spans...what? one or two paragraphs? My point is, this graphic novel requires an artist that can create dynamic interest out of a fair amount of talking heads, through various camera angles, close ups and long shots, and interesting backgrounds and actions, while make all those talking heads fascinating.

Raúl Allén ain't that guy. Hell, if they had gotten Bill Sienkiewicz to do the insides instead of just the cover, he may have managed to overcome the crap writing and give us something approaching special.

Why do I keep doing this to myself? Picking up something that is inspired by Frank Herbert, hoping against hope that it'll be better than what they've done before, but ultimately realizing that, once again, a good idea was butchered by Brian and Kevin.

Why do I do it? Because I love Dune. I've loved it since I first read it at 14, and 44 years later, I still do. So yeah, I'll help line Brian and Kevin's pockets with more undeserved wealth and pick up the next couple of installments of this, but I don't expect to be anything but underwhelmed again and again. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
derson, Raúl Allén & Patricia Martín (2020, USA). Despite repeated attempts to find further means of cashing in on the Dune corpus, by 2010 interest had clearly begun to wane and two planned Dune books by Brian Herbert and Kevin J Anderson were quietly cancelled (although another trilogy was completed and published). With, it must be said, good reason: their additions to the Dune universe have been uniformly shit. But then the Dune film – its second movie adaptation – was greenlighted, with no less than semi-auteur box-office darling Denis Villeneuve at the helm, and the Dune universe suddenly got a shot in the arm. I’d thought this graphic novel adaptation was, like the earlier Marvel one, tied in to the new movie adaptation. But now I’m not so sure. The artwork in the graphic novel doesn’t appear to match the production design from the Dune movie trailer. Which suggests it’s yet another cash-in. On the one hand, the graphic novel is faithful to the novel. But it fluffs some scenes – the banquet scene especially – and puts too much emphasis on others, such as the gom jabbar scene. But, worse than that, everything looks disappointingly generic. Lynch’s film had its problems, but it looked absolutely gorgeous. It had exactly that level of over-elaborate design you’d expect of Frank Herbert’s universe. I doubt Villeneuve’s production design will match it. The graphic novel art looks, well, boring. The characters appear far too ordinary and similar and, disappointingly, there’s no intricate detail in the backgrounds. This is the blandest version of Dune that has been produced yet. I will, of course, be buying books two and three. ( )
  iansales | Apr 15, 2021 |
I dutifully read the first six books of the Dune series back in the '80s to earn my sci fi geek cred, despite the fact that I found them intensely boring. (Around the same time, I masochistically slogged through Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant.)

This stiff graphic adaptation just drives home for me how dull the first book is with its dreary court intrigue and hollow protagonist, Paul Atreides.

I always did get a kick out of Herbert's character names though, e.g., Gurney Halleck, Duncan Idaho, Vladimir Harkonnen, Feyd-Rautha, Shadout Mapes, and Iakin Nefud. ( )
  villemezbrown | Dec 29, 2020 |
The first volume in a planned three volume adaptation of Frank Herbert’s masterpiece is the most faithful adaptation of the book yet, and that informs both its strengths and weaknesses. For Dune purists it hits all the story points and remains true to the source material. But that approach also means that the dialog doesn’t always work in the comics format leading to some stilted exchanges. The visual design choices are less extreme than the movie or TV adaptations and probably more realistic, but the art while technically well done feels a little flat, and I got no real feel of the characters as individuals. There are also a few lettering mistakes which I wouldn’t expect in a book with such high production values. Overall it’s a nice package and will appeal to those already familiar with the novel. ( )
  gothamajp | Dec 1, 2020 |
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Brian Herbertprimary authorall editionscalculated
Anderson, Kevin Jmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Allén, RaúlIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Martín, PatriciaIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic. - From Collected Sayings of Maud'dib by the Princess Irulan
Dedication
For Frank Herbert, who read the early drafts of Dune to his family, and to his loving wife of nearly four decades, Beverly Herbert, who always provided wise counsel
First words
Arrakis. Dune.
A beginning is the time for taking the most delicate care that the balances are correct.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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First installment of a three-volume graphic novel adaptation by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson of the novel Dune by Frank Herbert.
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The first graphic novel adaptation of Dune, the groundbreaking science-fiction classic by Frank Herbert--now in a deluxe collector's edition   Dune, Frank Herbert's epic science-fiction masterpiece set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar society, tells the story of Paul Atreides as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis. A stunning blend of adventure and mysticism, environmentalism, and politics, Dune is a powerful, fantastical tale that takes an unprecedented look into our universe, and is transformed by the graphic novel format. Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's adaptation retains the integrity of the original novel, and Raúl Allén and Patricia Martín's magnificent illustrations, along with cover art by Bill Sienkiewicz, bring the book to life for a new generation of readers. A national bestseller, Dune: The Graphic Novel, is now available in a deluxe collector's edition with an increased trim size of 7 1/2" x 11 1/4", printed on high-quality matte art paper in a faux-cloth slipcase with gold foil stamping tip-on cover.

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