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Dune by Frank Herbert
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Dune (1965)

by Frank Herbert

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Dune (1), Dune Saga (12), Dune: complete chronology (8)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
28,11541963 (4.29)3 / 816
  1. 3010
    Foundation by Isaac Asimov (Patangel, JonTheTerrible, philAbrams)
    JonTheTerrible: The pace of these books are similar as well as the topics they cover: society and government. The science plays only a small role in both books but is present enough to successfully build the worlds in which the characters inhabit.
  2. 123
    Hyperion by Dan Simmons (corporate_clone)
    corporate_clone: It is difficult not to compare Dune and Hyperion, even though both series have major differences in terms of tone, style and philosophy. Those are two long, epic, elaborate and very ambitious sci-fi masterpieces where religion plays a key role. I would highly recommend the fans of one to check out the other.… (more)
  3. 60
    The Faded Sun Trilogy by C. J. Cherryh (reading_fox)
    reading_fox: Same basic sort of premise - SciFi set on desert worlds inspires the rise of a galactic empire, but very different outcomes!
  4. 82
    Gateway by Frederik Pohl (Vonini)
  5. 40
    A Door Into Ocean by Joan Slonczewski (Anonymous user)
  6. 85
    Lord Valentine's Castle by Robert Silverberg (corporate_clone)
    corporate_clone: Both books are a subtle blend of science fiction and fantasy while being truly epic stories. Although Dune remains a superior literary achievement in my view, Silverberg's Majipoor series is a credible alternative.
  7. 41
    Grass by Sheri S. Tepper (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the description of the planet.
  8. 20
    Bright of the Sky by Kay Kenyon (amysisson)
    amysisson: Different in tone, but similar in scope, plus it's also about the lengths to which empires will go to maintain the status quo.
  9. 31
    The Word for World is Forest by Ursula K. Le Guin (andomck)
    andomck: Ecological science fiction.
  10. 43
    Singularity Sky by Charles Stross (hyper7)
    hyper7: Singularity Sky could have been set in the Dune universe.
  11. 21
    The King Must Die & The Bull from the Sea by Mary Renault (themulhern)
    themulhern: Young man with special powers and noble blood overthrows the established order through cunning and charisma. In the process he changes his people and then the rot sets in.
  12. 21
    The Snow Queen by Joan D. Vinge (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: Similar tropes in the form of human computers and a native species capable of granting youth, and the powerful woman trying to breed a special child- The Snow Queen seems on one level a response to Dune, taking many of the same elements and twisting them around, while going in quite different directions in other ways.… (more)
  13. 10
    The Enterprise of Death by Jesse Bullington (Sandwich76)
  14. 21
    Marrow by Robert Reed (Sandwich76)
  15. 32
    The Lazarus Effect by Frank Herbert (d_perlo)
    d_perlo: So you have read Frank Herbert's Dune series and want more? Thy The Lazarus Effect, The Jesus Incident, and The Ascension Factor, also by Frank Herbert. This is his take on a water world.
  16. 22
    Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson (wvlibrarydude)
    wvlibrarydude: Substance gives power to individual. Lots of political intrigue with interesting characters.
  17. 11
    The Broken God by David Zindell (whiten06)
    whiten06: Another coming-of-age story with the protagonist gaining god-like knowledge through the use of hallucinogens.
  18. 12
    Beowulf's Children by Larry Niven (ed.pendragon)
    ed.pendragon: Similar approach to exploring ecology of a fictional planet while adding to the mix of myth-inspired human interaction.
  19. 13
    Even Peons are People: Interplanetary Justice by D. Pak (philAbrams)
    philAbrams: Little things that just add up, despite different major themes.
  20. 24
    The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan (LaPhenix)
    LaPhenix: Another messiah story drawing inspiration from similar sources.

(see all 23 recommendations)

1960s (11)
(2)
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English (410)  Italian (3)  Dutch (2)  German (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (417)
Showing 1-5 of 410 (next | show all)
While I liked the strength of the Litany against Fear, and that of Jessica, I found much of the implication disturbing (the use of Arabic and associating fanatacism with desert life).
Nevertheless, the book does provide food for thought, and strong female characters.
Shira Destinie
Universal Date: Tues, 21.11.12014 HE ( )
  ShiraDest | Mar 6, 2019 |
What has mood to do with it? You fight when the necessity arises—no matter the mood! Mood's a thing for cattle or making love or playing the baliset. It's not for fighting.

My problems with Dune are not issues with speculation. My disbelief is maintained through healthy exercise. Much as I am opposed to terms like world-building I can empathize and imagine. Pondering alternatives is a heady philosophical endeavor. That said, I do not like the insistence on the epic in SF/F. What I want is a Month in The Country or a Stoner on some distant world. Maybe that is why Dhalgren and Embassytown hold such appeal. I read the first 300 pages in a rush. I noted that it was the cast of Hamlet involved in the Battle of Lepanto and deciding to stage a production of Othello. Along the way Ned Stark becomes a suicide bomber. Matters sort of went downhill from there. I didn’t pick up the book for a few weeks and then blew through the remaining 200 pages in two days. Lawrence of Arabia imbibes a magic elixir and becomes Harry Potter and the womenfolk just hope for the proper man, both in prophetic terms as well as totems of identity and fulfillment. Wooden dialogue muddied a clever use of stream-of-consciousness.

Alejandro Jodorowsky was an ultimate influence on my reading. His unrealized cinematic adaptation was a superior vision to what was committed to paper by Herbert. Here's to my pledge that the inchoate will never be terraformed. ( )
1 vote jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
This book isn't really as long as it looks; the publisher spaced out the type in order to milk a few more bucks out of the reader. However, it felt quite long--not because a lot happens it it, but because virtually nothing does.

I did enjoy the book at first. You expect an epic like this to start off slow, for world-building, introduction of characters, etc. But once that's all done you expect it to pick up a little. Instead, it actually gets slower. By the mid-point I was getting really bored. The lack of action of any kind is even further bogged down by a lot of mysticism. If you want to see where George Lucas got the idea for "the Force", as well as quite a few other elements of his movie saga, read this book. The swipes are so blatant, I'm surprised there was no legal action on Herbert's part.

Anyway, back to the book. It was a struggle to finish. At the end of the book is a jarring shift to an action packed finale that feels unearned and out of nowhere. While it doesn't exactly end on a cliffhanger, I wouldn't say this was a stand-alone novel. It feels like a first chapter...that's several hundred pages long.

I also struggled to see what people found of value in it. The litany on fear is a good one, but you can find it in the first ten pages. No need to wade through the rest. ( )
  chaosfox | Feb 22, 2019 |
It was the Sci-Fi channel's mini-series that got me to finally pick up this book but I'd been introduced to Dune before that by mom. She's a big synopsis talker, the kind of lady who won't bother you with her opinion about a book or movie, but will detail several key scenes for your benefit. When we came across her Dune books while going through boxes in the garage I was given a verbal sketch of a mother and son caught in a desert planet, driven to the edges of eveything that they knew. In that way a lot of books were impressed on me long before I picked them up for myself.

Dune is a vast book and one that is as sucessful today as it was when it was first written. In my opinion it's the first epic speculative fiction novel after Lord of the Rings, and has imitators and decesendents on both sides of the, more or less arbitrary these days, division line between fantasy and science fiction.

Herbert did an extraordinary thing with his chapter headings, snippets from histories, songs, prayers, etc., that foreshadowed and enhanced events of the book that are hundreds of pages away. I have yet to read any other book that uses this method so effectively to develop the awesome scale of history and tradition that most other authors can only attempt to mimic. The future here is by millenia more distant than that dealt with by most novelists, but Herbert makes his feudal space society plausible.

The more of these great, influential books I reread the more I realize how rare the ones that stand up to my oh-so-adult scrutiny are, how few don't fall prey to the weaknesses of their times. Herbert had some heavy homophobic issues, quite literally in the case of the vile Baron Harkonnen, and his women often failed to come out from their behind-the-throne string pulling or homemaker roles, but the book is so well-balanced that I'm not sidetracked by them as I was by gender issues of some genre author I could mention.. Plus, I have high hopes for the sequels, which I'm reading soon, to advance certain characters more, such as Alia and Irulan (I have no hope for Chani), even if on the whole the sequels are not as great as the original.

One last thing, I love how perfect the ending of Dune is, the whole book we're treated to excerpts from books written or compiled by Princess Irulan only to be given that punch of an ending line. It still shocks me and adds a disquieting edge to Paul's own thoughts earlier on how he can't prevent the coming jihad that will be held in his name. ( )
2 vote ManWithAnAgenda | Feb 18, 2019 |
A brilliant work of science fiction, Dune follows the ancient dispute of the noble houses Atreides and Harkonnen, with the usual suspects of politics, rulers, religion, business and the economy, the military etc. having a role in it. The universe is very detailed and well-thought out, with well defined social class structure, religions and technical advancements.

The main character is the son of the Duke Atreides, Paul, who even as a teenager exhibits mental prowess and premonition abilities, partially brought on by his Bene Gesserit training, illegally administered by his mother, the ducal concubine Lady Jessica.

Paul and his family leave their home-world of Caladan for the desert planet Arrakis-Dune in an imperially mandated change of fief. But, are they gaining a new planent rich in precious melange spice, or are they walking into a Harkonnen trap? ( )
  matija2019 | Jan 8, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 410 (next | show all)
Why is Blanch’s influence on Dune worth recognizing? Celebrating Blanch is not a means to discredit Herbert, whose imaginative novel transcends the sum of its influences. But Dune remains massively popular while The Sabres of Paradise languishes in relative obscurity, and renewed public interest in Blanch’s forgotten history would be a welcome development.

Isaac Asimov’s Foundation trilogy was famously inspired by Edward Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. J. R. R. Tolkien’s background in medieval languages helped shape the mythology of Middle Earth. Frank Herbert’s Dune is no different, and rediscovering one of the book’s most significant influences is a rewarding experience.
 
One of the monuments of modern science fiction.
added by GYKM | editChicago Tribune
 

» Add other authors (23 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Herbert, FrankAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cassidy, OrlaghNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
de Fontaine, DorothyMapsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Di Fate, VincentCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dirda, MichaelIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Herbert, BrianAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morton, EuanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pennington, BruceCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schoenherr, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Siudmak, WojciechCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stuyter, M.K.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Toivonen, AnjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weber, SamIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dune (1984IMDb)
Dune (2000IMDb)
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Epigraph
Dedication
To the people whose labours go beyond ideas into the realm of 'real materials' - to the dry-land ecologists, wherever they may be, in whatever time they work, this effort at prediction is dedicated in humility and admiration.
First words
A beginning is the time for taking the most delicate care that the balances are correct... from "Manual of Muad'dib" by the Princess Irulan
In the week before their departure to Arakis, when all the final scurrying about had reached a nearly unbearable frenzy, an old crone came to visit the mother of the boy, Paul.
Quotations
I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.
Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic.
Let us not rail about justice as long as we have arms and the freedom to use them.
The thing the ecologically illiterate don't realize about an ecosystem is that it's a system. A system! A system maintains a certain fluid stability that can be destroyed by a misstep in just one niche. A system has order, a flowing from point to point. If something dams the flow, order collapses. The untrained miss the collapse until too late. That's why the highest function of ecology is the understanding of consequences.
The willow submits to the wind and prospers until one day it is many willows — a wall against the wind. This is the willow's purpose.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
If you are combining a translated copy please check carefully as in some languages this book was split into two volumes. In some languages there is a single volume edition and a split edition - you should only combine the single volume edition with the English edition. Languages known to have multiple-volumes: French, German,
Publisher's editors
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Book description
Set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar empire where planetary fiefdoms are controlled by noble Houses that owe an allegiance to the Imperial House Corrino, Dune tells the story of young Paul Atreides (heir apparent to Duke Leto Atreides and scion of House Atreides) as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis, the only source of the spice melange, the most important and valuable substance in the universe. The story explores the complex and multilayered interactions of politics, religion, ecology, technology, and human emotion, as forces of the Empire confront each other for control of Arrakis and its spice.

AR 5.7, 28 Pts
Haiku summary
Foretold one gets dumped
in desert, then goes native.
Returns, beats baddies!
(ed.pendragon)
Fear the mind killer
Worm vomit expands the mind
Kwisatz Haderach
(amweb)

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0441013597, Paperback)

This Hugo and Nebula Award winner tells the sweeping tale of a desert planet called Arrakis, the focus of an intricate power struggle in a byzantine interstellar empire. Arrakis is the sole source of Melange, the "spice of spices." Melange is necessary for interstellar travel and grants psychic powers and longevity, so whoever controls it wields great influence.

The troubles begin when stewardship of Arrakis is transferred by the Emperor from the Harkonnen Noble House to House Atreides. The Harkonnens don't want to give up their privilege, though, and through sabotage and treachery they cast young Duke Paul Atreides out into the planet's harsh environment to die. There he falls in with the Fremen, a tribe of desert dwellers who become the basis of the army with which he will reclaim what's rightfully his. Paul Atreides, though, is far more than just a usurped duke. He might be the end product of a very long-term genetic experiment designed to breed a super human; he might be a messiah. His struggle is at the center of a nexus of powerful people and events, and the repercussions will be felt throughout the Imperium.

Dune is one of the most famous science fiction novels ever written, and deservedly so. The setting is elaborate and ornate, the plot labyrinthine, the adventures exciting. Five sequels follow. --Brooks Peck

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:37 -0400)

(see all 10 descriptions)

This Hugo and Nebula Award winner tells the sweeping tale of a desert planet called Arrakis, the focus of an intricate power struggle in a byzantine interstellar empire. Arrakis is the sole source of Melange, the "spice of spices." Melange is necessary for interstellar travel and grants psychic powers and longevity, so whoever controls it wields great influence. The troubles begin when stewardship of Arrakis is transferred by the Emperor from the Harkonnen Noble House to House Atreides. The Harkonnens don't want to give up their privilege, though, and through sabotage and treachery they cast young Duke Paul Atreides out into the planet's harsh environment to die. There he falls in with the Fremen, a tribe of desert dwellers who become the basis of the army with which he will reclaim what's rightfully his. Paul Atreides, though, is far more than just a usurped duke. He might be the end product of a very long-term genetic experiment designed to breed a super human; he might be a messiah. His struggle is at the center of a nexus of powerful people and events, and the repercussions will be felt throughout the Imperium. Dune is one of the most famous science fiction novels ever written, and deservedly so. The setting is elaborate and ornate, the plot labyrinthine, the adventures exciting.… (more)

» see all 19 descriptions

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