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The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
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The Eye of the World (1990)

by Robert Jordan

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Wheel of Time (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
13,179250272 (4.02)2 / 330
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  2. 51
    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss (Anonymous user)
  3. 31
    Magician by Raymond E. Feist (scribeswindow)
  4. 10
    The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien (RickyHaas)
  5. 10
    Dune by Frank Herbert (LaPhenix)
    LaPhenix: Another messiah story drawing inspiration from similar sources.
  6. 10
    Hunter's Oath by Michelle West (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: Epic fantasy that breaks out of the Tolkien mold more than the Wheel of Time, but retains the large cast, the mythic overtones, and the vast worldbuilding.
  7. 10
    The Curse of the Mistwraith by Janny Wurts (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: Epic fantasy with plenty of twisty prophecies and depth to speculate on, for those who enjoyed that in the Wheel of Time series.
  8. 13
    Shadowmarch by Tad Williams (alcc)
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English (243)  Dutch (3)  French (1)  Italian (1)  German (1)  All languages (249)
Showing 1-5 of 243 (next | show all)
Summary: Following an attack of trollocs and a Myrdraal on Emonds Field, Rand and two friends, joined by several others, flee when they realize that they are the object of the attack, and somehow at the center of a web of destiny that may either thwart or aid the rise of the Dark Power.

Rand and his two friends Mat and Perrin, along with Egwene, the innkeeper's daughter seem ordinary youth in a remote village, Emonds Field. Egwene is apprenticed to Nynaeve, the Wisdom (a kind of healer) of the village. The greatest excitement comes at Bel Tine, a feast at which Thom Merrilin, a gleeman or storyteller arrives. All this changes when it turns out that a strange, dark figure (Myrdraal) each of the boys sees leads a fist of trollocs to invade the village. Tam, Rand's father is nearly killed and bequeaths his heron-mark blade sword to Rand. A regal woman, Moiraine heals Tam, and then helps the young men see that they were the object of the attack, and one or all are at the center of a web of destiny in a battle against good and evil. To save Emonds Field from further attack, they must flee and make their way to Tar Valon, where Moiraine is part of an order of Aes Sedai, women who have been trained to channel the One Power to resist the Dark Power as well as to "gentle" men who cannot wield the power without becoming insane.

This results in a desperate flight by the boys and Egwene, Thom, Moiraine, and her warder Lanb, pursued physically and even in dreams by the powers of evil. Nynaeve, concerned for her villagers, tracks them and joins the company. Mat is compromised and nearly lost when he steals a dagger from a hoard in an abandoned city. The party is separated, and except for Thom eventually make it to Caemlyn, where they are reunited. Thom, who was with Mat and Rand, sacrifices himself so they can escape, although there is a question of whether he really died. It is here that Moiraine understands the true threat of evil to the Eye of the World, a pool thus far untouched by evil, and Rand understands that he is at "the heart of it all" a ta'veren or a person around which the Wheel of Time weaves surrounding life threads, forming a Web of Destiny. The company, joined by Loial, an Ogier, pursue desperate ways through the Blight to confront evil, and for Rand, to confront his destiny.

Jordan's work has been likened to The Lord of the Rings. Except in sheer length of the fourteen volume series, I do not think he surpasses him, and there are elements that are at least parallel, if not derivative to Tolkien--a remote people, ordinary figures caught up in a great conflict, a company, dark riders, a desperate flight and quest against the rising of a Dark Power who threatens the world.

That said, Jordan has also created a richly textured world with a history, a unique vision of time, and a seemingly different way of thinking about power that seems more eastern than western. Light and dark seem two sides of the same coin. It turns out that only women who have been trained can wield the One Power as a force of Light. Men are turned insane by it or to instruments of the Dark Power, something that will become an issue for Rand. Time symbolized by the Wheel with an intertwined snake swallowing its own tail brings past, present and future together and weaves a fate for individuals. Instead of "God works in mysterious ways" it is “The wheel weaves as the wheel wills,” which is repeated near to the point of becoming tedious. As in real life, forces of good often are at cross purposes--different orders of Aes Sedai, the Children of Light, and the various kingdoms, all at some point becoming threats to the quest as much as the Dark Power.

Jordan creates strong female characters. Aes Sedai Moraine leads the party and wields great power. Nynaeve the Wisdom and even Egwene have their own power, Moiraine seeing them as Aes Sedai in training. Caemlyn is ruled by a strong queen, Morgase, to be succeeded one day by her daughter Elayne. I can't think of an evil female character in this volume. Not so with the men, such as Padan Fain, the evil peddler and Dark Friend. Yet there are both strong and delightful male characters from some of the innkeepers to Thom, the gleeman, who lays down his life and most of all Lan, the warder, descended from kings (one thinks often of Aragorn).

So the question is, will I go on? I can say that I will not be binge-reading the series. Yet the writing held my attention, and I find myself caring about what will happen to Rand and the others. I wonder if the Dark Power will be defeated and I'm curious why it takes fourteen books. It is clear that Jordan's plots take many twists and turns, only some of which resolved in this book. I wonder how patient I would be with this over such an extended series.

Some friends have told me that the middle books do seem to get bogged down at times. I'd be curious what others think. Was it a slog, or did you not want it to end? Did you read straight through or read another volume periodically? Did you finish the series or give up? As you can tell, I haven't made up my mind. This was a great summer read. Maybe that's what I'll do, except that this would take until 2031. Wheel of Time fans, I need some encouragement here... ( )
  BobonBooks | Aug 16, 2018 |
Love, love, love it. My cousins have been reading the series for years. Happy to finally get to know it. Can't wait to continue the series. ( )
  CSKteach | Jul 20, 2018 |
Book: 3 stars
Well, that was... long.
I'm not sure how to feel about this book. I loved it as a teenager, but now I mostly find the characters annoying. The plot is interesting though, and I know that at least some of the characters become less annoying in later books, and more awesome characters are yet to come, so I will definitely continue with the series. First time I gave up around book #9 because there were no more books translated to Serbian and I couldn't do the shift to English easily, but I still after all these years want to find out what happens at the end.

Audio: 4 stars
The narrators are awesome. I was a bit annoyed by the male narrator at the beginning though, he had a strange tilt in the middle of his sentences that took me a while to get used to.

Also: All this time I've been pronouncing the names of people and places wrong. The translation to Serbian is mostly to blame because they did a rotten job of it, but now I feel like I'm reading a different book. It took me a while to get used to the correct pronunciation of names, character names especially. ( )
  NannyOgg13 | Jun 6, 2018 |
As with the other book, this is simply the continuation of the story. Jordan’s works don’t have the same feel as many series, where you get a distinct story each book. Instead, his books each feel like just another chapter in the story. Adventure and Danger, Magic and Darkness, Evil Doings and Brave Deeds abound.
High fantasy at its best! ( )
  empress8411 | May 25, 2018 |
I loved reading about the scenery in this book, it felt like you were there in the field walking through a lush world. Some areas I can still clearly picture in my mind. The characters were developed well and were interesting as well. It had a Lord of the Rings feeling but was still different in it's own way. I'm looking forward to continuing the series. Just waiting until I buy the larger paperback version or hardcover version as the mass market paperback version are horrible to read as the words almost reach the center of the book so you always have to pull hard on the pages.

Great book though, I recommend it if you haven't already read it. ( )
  damred | May 15, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 243 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jordan, Robertprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Canty, ThomasCartographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grove, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kramer, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mitchell, EllisaCartographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nielsen, Matthew C.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reading, KateNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Russo, CarolCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Staffilano, Gaetano LuigiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sweet, Darrell K.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
And the shadow fell upon the Land, and the World was riven stone from stone. The oceans fled, and the mountains were swallowed up, and the nations were scattered to the eight corners of the World. The moon was as blood, and the sun was as ashes. The seas boiled, and the living envied the dead. All was shattered, and all but memory lost, and one memory above all others, of him who brought the Shadow and the Breaking of the World. And him they named Dragon.

(from Aleth nin Taerin alta Camora,
The Breaking of the World.

Author unknown, the Fourth Age)
And it came to pass in those days, as it had come before and would come again, that the Dark lay heavy on the land and weighed down the hearts of men, and the green things failed, and hope died. And men cried out to the Creator, saying, O Light of the Heavens, Light of the World, let the Promised One be born of the mountain, according to the prophecies, as he was in ages past and will be in ages to come. Let the Prince of the Morning sing to the land that green things will grow and the valleys give forth lambs. Let the arm of the Lord of the Dawn shelter us from the Dark, and the great sword of justice defend us. Let the Dragon ride again on the winds of time.
(from Charal Drianaan te Calamon,
The Cycle of the Dragon.

Author unknown, the Fourth Age)
Dedication
To Harriet
Heart of my heart,
Light of my life,
Forever
First words
The palace still shook occasionally as the earth rumbled in memory, groaned as if it would deny what had happened. (Prologue)
The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth comes again. In one Age, called the Third Age by some, an Age yet to come, an Age long past, a wind rose in the Mountains of the Mist. The wind was not the beginning. There are neither beginning nor endings to turning of the Wheel of Time. But it was a beginning. (Chapter One)
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Колелото на времето се върти и вековете идват и си отиват, оставяйки спомени, които се превръщат в легенди. Легендите заглъхват в мит и дори митът отдавна е забравен, когато породилият го век се върне отново. В Третия век, Века на Пророчеството, на косъм висят самият Свят и самото Време. Онова, което е било, което ще бъде и което е, може да падне под властта на Сянката.
Haiku summary
The Fade on his horse /
The trollocs crash winternight /
Ba'alzamon‎'s eyes (davidwil)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812511816, Mass Market Paperback)

The Wheel of Time turns and Ages come and go, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. In the Third Age, an Age of Prophecy, the World and Time themselves hang in the balance. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:00:15 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

In the Third Age, an age of prophecy when the world and time themselves hang in the balance, the Dark One, imprisoned by the Creator, is stirring in Shayol Ghul.

» see all 6 descriptions

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