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The White Lioness (1993)

by Henning Mankell

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Kurt Wallander (3)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,006883,888 (3.73)140
Like his countrymen Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo, Mankell writes mysteries that connect crimes in Sweden to the rest of the world. Faceless Killers (1997), the first of his books about provincial police inspector Kurt Wallender to appear here, involved Turkish immigrants and Eastern European villains. This novel, written in 1993, links the murder of a real estate agent in Wallender's town of Ystad to South Africa, where Nelson Mandela has just been released from prison, and to Russia, where the KGB is busy planning Mandela's fate. Wallender is a classically dour but dedicated policeman whose pro.… (more)
  1. 10
    The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth (charlie68)
    charlie68: Both fictional works of assination of famous figures.
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» See also 140 mentions

English (68)  Spanish (5)  Dutch (4)  French (3)  German (2)  Italian (2)  Catalan (2)  Norwegian (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (88)
Showing 1-5 of 68 (next | show all)
A bit long-winded. But it was a complex plot and the length was ultimately rewarding. ( )
  cziering | Nov 27, 2022 |
A "sort of" semi historic fiction, involving plot to assassinate Mandela in South Africa. Plodding and somewhat depressing. Wallander is clinically depressed, with suicide predicted soon. ( )
  fwbl | Oct 27, 2022 |
I enjoyed this book a lot. It's the third Wallander book I've read, and I'm getting to know him better, I think. But since I'm reading them in order, perhaps the author is also getting to know him better.

Wallander seems to be a complex character. He cares a lot about people, and also about doing a good job. Perhaps he cares too much, and this causes a lot of distress for him, and the people around him. He's always going off by himself chasing leads, often away from shouts of "wait for backup", which he always seems to ignore.

This book had one upside to his personal life; things got so bad for him that his daughter and father both seemed to show their love for him more, which makes him feel better, I'm sure. ( )
  MartyFried | Oct 9, 2022 |
9789871544035
  archivomorero | Jun 27, 2022 |
This was a weird one. It's much longer than the earlier ones in the series and it honestly feels like two separate books mashed together; one about Wallander in Sweden, one about a plot in Apartheid South Africa. I have no way of knowing but I wouldn't be surprised if Mankell was writing a book set in South Africa and someone said "Hey, your Wallander books are really taking off, can we get Wallander into this story?" and this book is the result.

Because of how disconnected the characters are between the two stories I kept losing interest as, just as I'd get into one plot in one country, off we'd go to the other plot in the other country. There is token communication between some characters between the plots but it just felt too disjointed to me.

I think if it was two separate stories (the stuff that happens in Sweden would work as a Wallander novel without also having to see all the South African stuff, and that South African stuff could work without going into great detail about the overseas preparations) they might both be verging on 4 stars but as it is I'm going with 3 stars because the combination just didn't click for me and felt overly forced. It also bothered me how far Wallander went off the rails without much provocation at first and Mankell's recurring plot device of a witness showing up late in the story with a remarkably detailed memory of key events to move things forward is getting a bit tired (I imagine that last one is probably the way a lot of real life police mysteries get solved but in a work of fiction it ironically feels unrealistic because it lacks the causation of everything else). ( )
  ElegantMechanic | May 28, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 68 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (22 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Mankell, HenningAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gibson, AnnaTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gloßmann, ErikÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jänisniemi, LauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Puleo, GiorgioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thompson, LaurieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
As long as we assign value to the people of our country on the basis of their skin colour, we will force them to endure what Socrates termed the lie at the depths of our souls. Jan Hofmeyr, 1946
Who dares to play while the lion roars? African Proverb
Dedication
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
À mes amis du Mozambique
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Louise Åkerblom, an estate agent, left the Savings Bank in Skurup shortly after 3.00 in the afternoon on Friday, April 24.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Like his countrymen Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo, Mankell writes mysteries that connect crimes in Sweden to the rest of the world. Faceless Killers (1997), the first of his books about provincial police inspector Kurt Wallender to appear here, involved Turkish immigrants and Eastern European villains. This novel, written in 1993, links the murder of a real estate agent in Wallender's town of Ystad to South Africa, where Nelson Mandela has just been released from prison, and to Russia, where the KGB is busy planning Mandela's fate. Wallender is a classically dour but dedicated policeman whose pro.

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En man som bor i ett skjul i den sydafrikanska Transkei, får i uppdrag att mörda en icke namngiven man, som senare visar sig vara Nelson Mandela. Uppdraget kommer från en grupp extremkonservativa afrikaaner som försöker behålla makten hos de vita och starta ett inbördeskrig, när apartheid monteras ner.

Samtidigt försvinner fastighetsmäklaren Louise Åkerblom i Ystad. Kommissarie Wallander inser snart att det finns ett samband mellan händelserna.
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Average: (3.73)
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1 5
1.5 1
2 37
2.5 10
3 170
3.5 81
4 280
4.5 31
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