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How to Live on 24 Hours a Day (1910)

by Arnold Bennett

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4441845,793 (3.61)18
Originally published in 1910, this guide offers down-to-earth, practical advice about how to make the most of your day and how to strike the work-life balance—an issue still at the forefront of modern society’s concerns As you look back on the year that has just past, do you feel as though you spent another 12 months merely existing instead of truly living? Do you often go to bed at night with an anxious, sinking feeling that you wasted away another precious day? The important lesson, according to Arnold Bennett's guide, is to commit to carving out some time each day to do things that will really enrich your life and help you progress. Investing all your hours in a job you dislike; your routine consisting of getting up, going to work, coming home, unwinding, and going to bed—Bennett argues that this is not living but simply existing. Bennett's solution is to make the most of the time either side of working hours, the commute, the evening hours, and that golden time, the weekend! Time can be spent in various pursuits, from literature, enjoying of the arts, or even just time spent in reflection. This pioneering and original lifestyle and time management guide is succinctly and cleverly written in an easy-to-read and narrative style that readers will enjoy and find as useful today as it was 100 years ago.… (more)
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» See also 18 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
A great book, short and cut to the point, if you have an hour and a half please read this book.
  Pxan02 | May 14, 2022 |
Dr George Sheehan turned me on to this interesting book, in his book about running. It's very zen for it day. ( )
  kevn57 | Dec 8, 2021 |
I enjoy reading books written 100 years ago. The writing style is delightfully different, and it is intriguing how words have changed. Not to mention attitudes. Nowadays, a book with this title would tell us how easy it is, and cheer us on - "you can do it." Not this book. It was written when cheerleading was not the self-help style.

After bantering the reader for a while, he gets around to some suggestions. For those who don't like his suggestions, he has other suggestions. In any case, mind control is the key to happiness. He advocates spending half of the evenings of the week in developing the mind. He gives some suggestions on how to train the mind. Even if you like literature don't just read. There needs to be thinking involved. And if you enjoy reading, it should not just be novels. To him, poetry is "the highest form of literature." It might take a while before I want to read poetry. Alas, my education did not cultivate that interest.

CONTENTS
PREFACE
I THE DAILY MIRACLE
II THE DESIRE TO EXCEED ONE'S PROGRAMME
III PRECAUTIONS BEFORE BEGINNING
IV THE CAUSE OF THE TROUBLE
V TENNIS AND THE IMMORTAL SOUL
VI REMEMBER HUMAN NATURE
VII CONTROLLING THE MIND
VIII THE REFLECTIVE MOOD
IX INTEREST IN THE ARTS
X NOTHING IN LIFE IS HUMDRUM
XI SERIOUS READING
XII DANGERS TO AVOID
( )
  bread2u | Jul 1, 2020 |
This is a beautiful little book.

It's pithy, blunt and eminently practical.

The lessons in the book are extremely valuable today. I will buy the print version as soon as possible ( )
  RajivC | May 8, 2020 |
Everyone should devote the hour that it takes to reading this book. Perspective is amazing. ( )
  tertullian | Jan 22, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
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Originally published in 1910, this guide offers down-to-earth, practical advice about how to make the most of your day and how to strike the work-life balance—an issue still at the forefront of modern society’s concerns As you look back on the year that has just past, do you feel as though you spent another 12 months merely existing instead of truly living? Do you often go to bed at night with an anxious, sinking feeling that you wasted away another precious day? The important lesson, according to Arnold Bennett's guide, is to commit to carving out some time each day to do things that will really enrich your life and help you progress. Investing all your hours in a job you dislike; your routine consisting of getting up, going to work, coming home, unwinding, and going to bed—Bennett argues that this is not living but simply existing. Bennett's solution is to make the most of the time either side of working hours, the commute, the evening hours, and that golden time, the weekend! Time can be spent in various pursuits, from literature, enjoying of the arts, or even just time spent in reflection. This pioneering and original lifestyle and time management guide is succinctly and cleverly written in an easy-to-read and narrative style that readers will enjoy and find as useful today as it was 100 years ago.

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