HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Whore's Child: Stories (2002)

by Richard Russo

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7891623,116 (3.55)12
In his first collection, a master storyteller focuses on a fresh and fascinating range of human behavior. A jaded Hollywood movie-maker uncovers a decades-old flame he never knew he'd harbored; a precocious fifth grader puzzles over life, love, and baseball as he watches his parents' marriage dissolve; another child is forced into a harrowing cross-country escape; an elderly couple rediscovers the power of their relationship; and in the title story, a septuagenarian nun invades the narrator's college writing workshop with an incredible saga.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 12 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
Richard Russo is an old soul. He writes eloquently about what is more likely his parents' time -- of cocktail parties and defined gender roles and the conundrums of middle age, and the era of American manufacturing and the echoes it leaves in contemporary times. This collection of short stories touches on many of these themes with earnestness and sympathy and careful attention. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
I love short stories and i really enjoy Richard Russo. Thus i was excited to tear into this small collection. And i was not disappointed!!! I loved this book. Russo has some mysterious way of totally captivating me with his character's humanity.....i feel like i know them, be they adult or child.....i've felt those same things.....occasionally i realize he could be talking about me! Or my mother! It was really a joy to read. I live in Maine, as does Russo, so the Maine settings trip my trigger as well. 'The Whore's Child' (sad & poignant) was probably my favorite, with 'Joy Ride' (a child forced to deal with a mother trying to figure things out), 'Monhegan Island' (Seeing our life through someone else's eyes) , & 'The Mysteries of Linwood Hart' (the absolute mystery of growing up as a child with adult parents) all close behind. A quick easy read that i was sorry ended after only 7 stories! Thank you Mr. Russo! ( )
1 vote jeffome | Mar 18, 2018 |
Richard Russo is simply one my favorite authors and one of our best contemporary writers. I believe that I have now read all of his fiction. He writes novels but has done a couple of short story collections and this one would be a perfect introduction into his work. He writes a lot about working class towns in New England and the east. This collections deals with many different subjects but it is best at revealing the inner workings of his characters minds. The final and longest story is about a 10 year old boy dealing with his parents marital difficulties while he develops an interest in baseball. The book was worth it just for that story alone. You may also be familiar with Russo through his Pulitzer winning novel "Empire Falls" and "Nobody's Fool" which was made into a movie starring Paul Newman. Check him out. You will not be sorry. ( )
  nivramkoorb | Mar 15, 2018 |
4.5 These short stories will stand out in my experiences equally and caused me to contemplate the complex motivations, reactions, consequences, and feelings behind and within the simplest of human experiences.

Russo excels at creating characters who are so real that later you find yourself saying, "I know this guy once who....." and you realize, "No I didn't--that was a character in a book!"

This reading experience even had a perfect ending. I intended to finish it on the airplane so that I could leave it in the seat-back pocket for another traveler's serendipitous find. Better yet, a passenger next to me peeked at the cover of my engaging read and said, "Russo? Is this a new one? I've read everything he's written and I've never even heard of this one. I love Russo.... I saw him speak in Syracuse...." I finished this collection within 4 minutes of landing and handed it to her. So satisfying. ( )
  engpunk77 | Aug 10, 2015 |
All the characters in this short story collection are flawed, complex and richly drawn. I’ve read and loved many of Russo’s novels and his short stories did not disappoint. Most of the stories in this collection were the seeds for the novel Straight Man – a poignant, hilarious and caustic look at life in academia. Russo is a gifted writer and observer of people and their foibles. What I also love about Russo’s stories (short or otherwise) is his refusal to wrap his stories with a neat bow. The endings leave their somewhat deceived and foolish, but always very human characters a little wiser.
The protagonists in these stories are psychically and (in most cases, physically) wounded as they reflect on and respond to the intimacy and alienation they experience with those closest to them – wives, parents, children and friends. Russo’s writing is razor-sharp and he manages to elicit compassion for his characters despite their obvious and often unsympathetic faults. Each compact story recounts an episode in the protagonist’s life (a boy whose mother impulsively leaves her husband and takes her son on a cross-country journey, an older nun-the title story-who mysteriously enrolls in a college creative writing class and a man who seeks out the lover of his now deceased wife). In each story, the protagonist grapples with his understanding of himself and the meaning of his relationships to those closest to him.
Russo is a terrific and incisive writer who uniquely combines poignancy and often heartbreak with sharp humor. He doesn’t spell out his points, but his rich portrayal of his characters allows the reader to gain a deeper understanding of contemporary life. ( )
  plt | Sep 29, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Sister Ursula belonged to an all but extinct oder of Belgian nuns who conducted what little spiritual business remained to them in a decrepit old house purchased by the diocese seemingly because it was unlikely to outlast them.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Collection contains:
  • Whore's Child
  • Monhegan Light
  • Farther You Go
  • Joy Ride
  • Buoyancy
  • Poison
  • Mysteries of Linwood Hart
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

In his first collection, a master storyteller focuses on a fresh and fascinating range of human behavior. A jaded Hollywood movie-maker uncovers a decades-old flame he never knew he'd harbored; a precocious fifth grader puzzles over life, love, and baseball as he watches his parents' marriage dissolve; another child is forced into a harrowing cross-country escape; an elderly couple rediscovers the power of their relationship; and in the title story, a septuagenarian nun invades the narrator's college writing workshop with an incredible saga.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.55)
0.5
1 2
1.5 2
2 6
2.5 2
3 53
3.5 22
4 48
4.5 7
5 16

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 173,532,487 books! | Top bar: Always visible