HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Going After Cacciato

by Tim O'Brien

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,255337,020 (3.89)124
"To call Going After Cacciato a novel about war is like calling Moby-Dick a novel about whales." So wrote the New York Times of Tim O'Brien's now classic novel of Vietnam. Winner of the 1979 National Book Award, Going After Cacciato captures the peculiar mixture of horror and hallucination that marked this strangest of wars. In a blend of reality and fantasy, this novel tells the story of a young soldier who one day lays down his rifle and sets off on a quixotic journey from the jungles of Indochina to the streets of Paris. In its memorable evocation of men both fleeing from and meeting the demands of battle, Going After Cacciato stands as much more than just a great war novel. Ultimately it's about the forces of fear and heroism that do battle in the hearts of us all.… (more)
  1. 00
    Beaufort by Ron Leshem (SqueakyChu)
    SqueakyChu: Both books are about the heavy toll of war.
  2. 00
    Loon by Jack McLean (SqueakyChu)
    SqueakyChu: Both books are about the Vietnam war.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 124 mentions

English (32)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (33)
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
Amazing, imaginative novel of a squad of grunts marching from S Viet Nam to Paris. I was repeatedly blown away by this journey. Though it predates it by decades, I was very much reminded of Colson Whitehead's _Underground Railroad_, taking a historical fact and catapulting it into fiction by running down the idea with an incredible vision.

Browsed upon at a well-curated bookshop in Port Townsend. ( )
  kcshankd | Apr 18, 2021 |
I have begun to think that Tim O'Brien has something of a myopic vision when it comes to Vietnam and Southeast Asia. He simply cannot produce anything beyond a vague image of the settings and atmosphere. There is no feel to his Asia, unlike the case with Graham Greene, W. Somerset Maugham, Norman Lewis, or even other Vietnam War writers such as Michael Herr, Gustav Hasford, or Philip Caputo. And in no fashion can he equal the work of someone such as Christopher Koch. There is always a curtain that seems to hang between the reader and O'Brien's characters and their situations. In some ways, it's like watching an Antonioni film, where physical barriers constantly intrude and block both the viewer and characters from physical and emotional contact with one another.

All of which is underscored when O'Brien turns from the realism of war to the night of imagination and the journey to Paris (and the peace talks). Both Delhi and Paris come alive in detail. The smell, odors, sounds, sights, and people, who seem so muffled and abstract in Southeast Asia, take on a specificity and vividness not apparent in the outpost or on the missions "in reality." This is where O'Brien is comfortable. The West. Asia is forever beyond him, I think. An alien land whose people are faceless villagers; cities which never make more than a token appearance. The best he can do is summon up a single woman from his fantasy, Sarkin Aun Wang, who isn't Vietnamese, although she comes from Cholon, or Chinese, or Cambodian, or Lao, or Burmese. In some vague way, she seems to be of an unidentified hill tribe, someone herself exiled from the main life of South East Asia. She, too, is a refugee. She doesn't belong. Neither does O'Brien. ( )
  PaulCornelius | Apr 12, 2020 |
Pretty amazing. Not so amazing as The Things They Carried, but almost. A sentry conjures up a story almost out of the Arabian Nights as the squad pursues a soldier gone AWOL--whose goal is Paris. A lot of reality flies out the door here, but the reality of what goes on in men's hearts and guts during war is as real as it gets. Interspersed with the pursuit, we see flashbacks into the horrible deaths of the squad has suffered. This is an incredible work of imagination, grounded in the reality so thick you would think it would swallow the plot, but it doesn't. About the only way to improve it would be to perhaps cut about 10 or 15 pages. The latter part of the book begins to drag just slightly. ( )
  datrappert | Jun 15, 2019 |
It is one thing to run from unhappiness; it is another to take action to realize those qualities of dignity and well-being that are the true standards of the human spirit.

I read this on a whim during a transition period. I appreciated its swagger. The premise is simple and fantastic, an infantryman frustrated by the lack of progress at the Paris Peace Talks, decides to walk there from Vietnam and his peers pursue him to save him from his own idealism. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
Dreamlike story of a quest and an escape from war, of a soldier in Vietnam who decides he's had enough and begins hiking to Paris, and of the soldiers tasked with bringing him back. The horror and absurdity and sheer unreality of war are on full display in this moving novel. ( )
  MichaelBarsa | Dec 17, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
This novel brought so much movement to the stationary act of reading, I would have held onto my hat if I had one. Suddenly
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Soldiers are dreamers.
 - Siegfried Sassoon
Dedication
For Erik Hansen
First words
It was a bad time.
Quotations
Peace of mind is not a simple matter of pursuing one's own pleasure; rather, it is inextricably linked to the attitudes of other human beings, to what they want, to what they expect.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"To call Going After Cacciato a novel about war is like calling Moby-Dick a novel about whales." So wrote the New York Times of Tim O'Brien's now classic novel of Vietnam. Winner of the 1979 National Book Award, Going After Cacciato captures the peculiar mixture of horror and hallucination that marked this strangest of wars. In a blend of reality and fantasy, this novel tells the story of a young soldier who one day lays down his rifle and sets off on a quixotic journey from the jungles of Indochina to the streets of Paris. In its memorable evocation of men both fleeing from and meeting the demands of battle, Going After Cacciato stands as much more than just a great war novel. Ultimately it's about the forces of fear and heroism that do battle in the hearts of us all.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.89)
0.5
1 3
1.5 2
2 18
2.5 11
3 91
3.5 22
4 153
4.5 19
5 110

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 206,384,411 books! | Top bar: Always visible