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The History of the Church: From Christ to Constantine

by Eusebius

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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4,288272,797 (3.74)15
Often called the 'Father of Church History,' Eusebius was the first to trace the rise of Christianity during its crucial first three centuries from Christ to Constantine. Our principal resource for earliest Christianity, The Church History presents a panorama of apostles, church fathers, emperors, bishops, heroes, heretics, confessors, and martyrs. This edition includes Paul L. Maier's clear and precise translation, historical commentary on each book in The Church History, and numerous maps, illustrations, and photographs. Coupled with helpful indexes and the Loeb numbering system, these features promise to liberate Eusebius from previous outdated and stilted works, creating a new standard primary resource for readers interested in the early history of Christianity.… (more)
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English (25)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (27)
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
The text was translated by Paul Maier who did an amazing job. I was impressed by how he culled some of the more superfluous words condensing it and making it easier to read. ( )
  wpeacejr | Dec 24, 2023 |
Bishop of Cesarea_ in Palestine
  Gordon_C_Olson_Libr | Apr 5, 2022 |
Absolutely essential reading for those interested in the development of early Christianity up to the 4th century, since it's the first full historical narrative written from the Christian point of view. The glossary in this new edition titled "Who's Who in Eusebius" is practical and helpful for keeping track of the numerous historical figures mentioned in these pages—I wish I'd had recourse to it the first time I read through this book as a student. ( )
1 vote wyclif | Sep 22, 2021 |
Very tough to read, the author has a bad writing style (i.e., from within 200 years of the birth of Christ) but full of information. Frankly, after several library renewals of the book, I did not finish it. ( )
  highlander6022 | Aug 24, 2021 |
Eusebius is a scholar, I learnt a lot of new things from this book. I am encouraged by the Early Church fathers especially Origen. It seems that the Early Christians had to face internal threats (heresies), external threats (ridicule, persecution), this is simply too much to Handle but God blessed them. The persecutions in the Roman empire is appalling. There's depth details about persecution especially during Diocletian Era, I could not digest a lot. I wish the Christians today would read this and teach their children. All the Church fathers had written polemics, defended the Christian claims during their Era. The Questions today faced by the Church are nothing great compared to their Era. Overall, a Great book, Eusebius taught me how the Early Bishops were, they were scholars, preachers, philosophers.
( )
  gottfried_leibniz | Apr 5, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Eusebiusprimary authorall editionscalculated
Cousin, LouisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crusé, Christian FredericTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Louth, AndrewEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maier, Paul L.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Radice, BettyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Williams, RowanForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Williamson, G. A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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If Herodotus is the father of history, then Eusebius of Caesarea (c. A.D.260-339) is certainly the father of church history.
Introduction to the G. A. Williamson edition -- 'The only work of its kind, possessing a value to subsequent ages which belongs to no other uninspired work.'
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Often called the 'Father of Church History,' Eusebius was the first to trace the rise of Christianity during its crucial first three centuries from Christ to Constantine. Our principal resource for earliest Christianity, The Church History presents a panorama of apostles, church fathers, emperors, bishops, heroes, heretics, confessors, and martyrs. This edition includes Paul L. Maier's clear and precise translation, historical commentary on each book in The Church History, and numerous maps, illustrations, and photographs. Coupled with helpful indexes and the Loeb numbering system, these features promise to liberate Eusebius from previous outdated and stilted works, creating a new standard primary resource for readers interested in the early history of Christianity.

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