HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Upanishads (1947)

by Anonymous, Eknath Easwaran (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,438203,769 (3.97)32
In the ancient wisdom texts called the Uphanishads, illumined sages share flashes of insight, the results of their investigation into consciousness itself. In extraordinary visions, they experience directly a transcendent Reality which is the essence, or Self, of each created being. They teach that each of us, each Self, is eternal, deathless, one with the power that created the universe. Easwaran's translation is reliable and readable, consistently the bestseller in its field. It includes an overview of the cultural and historical setting, with chapter introductions, notes, and a Sanskrit glossary. But it is Easwaran's understanding of the wisdom of the Upanishads, and their relevance to the modern reader, that makes this edition truly outstanding. Each sage, each Upanishads, appeal in different ways to the reader's head and heart. In the end, Easwaran writes, "The Upanishads belong not just to Hinduism. They are India's precious legacy to humanity, and in that spirit they are offered here."… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 32 mentions

English (17)  Spanish (2)  French (1)  All languages (20)
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
on the nature of humanity
  SrMaryLea | Aug 23, 2023 |
Another classic. You could consider this to be a practical guide towards spirituality. For usage in modern times, highlight what is important and filter or distill the repetitive parts. That said, an absolute must read. ( )
  thomastorfs | Mar 1, 2022 |
ancient, india, hindu, sanskrit, mythology, religion, philosophy
  bowershouse | Oct 11, 2021 |
Good overview of core of each upanishadas. ( )
  madhukaraphatak | Aug 12, 2020 |
Review is out on WordPress. ( )
  kala.e.kitaabi | Nov 8, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Anonymousprimary authorall editionscalculated
Eknath EaswaranAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Easwaran, EknathTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lannoy, RichardPhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manchester, FrederickTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mascaró, JuanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Müller, F. MaxTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Olivelle, PatrickTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prabhavananda, SwamiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Radice, BettyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roebuck, ValerieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Russell, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shearer, AlistairTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
[Dedication to the 1965 Penguin edition:]
To the spirit of
RABINDRANATH TAGORE,
1861-1941
 
And in Memory of
PROFESSOR MILLICENT MACKENZIE
1862-1942
First words
"Maitreyi," Yajnavalkya said to his wife one day, "the time has come for me to go forth from the worldly life."
Life in the world and life in the spirit are not incompatible.
[INTRODUCTION to the 1965 Penguin edition:]
The Sanskrit word Upanishad, Upa-ni-shad, comes from the verb sad, to sit, with upa, connected with Latin s-ub, under; and ni, found in English be-neath and ne-ther.
Behold the universe in the glory of God: and all that lives and moves on earth.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
In the ancient wisdom texts called the Uphanishads, illumined sages share flashes of insight, the results of their investigation into consciousness itself. In extraordinary visions, they experience directly a transcendent Reality which is the essence, or Self, of each created being. They teach that each of us, each Self, is eternal, deathless, one with the power that created the universe. Easwaran's translation is reliable and readable, consistently the bestseller in its field. It includes an overview of the cultural and historical setting, with chapter introductions, notes, and a Sanskrit glossary. But it is Easwaran's understanding of the wisdom of the Upanishads, and their relevance to the modern reader, that makes this edition truly outstanding. Each sage, each Upanishads, appeal in different ways to the reader's head and heart. In the end, Easwaran writes, "The Upanishads belong not just to Hinduism. They are India's precious legacy to humanity, and in that spirit they are offered here."

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.97)
0.5
1 4
1.5
2 16
2.5 2
3 46
3.5 9
4 86
4.5 6
5 87

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 205,833,426 books! | Top bar: Always visible