HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Narrows (2004)

by Michael Connelly

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Rachel Walling (2), Cassie Black (2), Terry McCaleb (3), Harry Bosch (10)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,003592,210 (3.77)45
Weaving lines of poetry into his gruesome crimes, the serial killer known to millions as the Poet returns. Rachel Walling, the FBI agent who years earlier had tried to track him down, has not forgotten him, and neither has former LAPD detective Harry Bosch who receives a call from an old friend whose husband had recently died. Even though his death appeared natural, the man's ties to the hunt for the Poet make Harry look twice, inevitably placing him in the path of the most ruthless and ingenious murderer in Los Angeles' history.… (more)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 45 mentions

English (56)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  All languages (59)
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
There's almost something here, in Alex Irvine's alternate history where Ford Motors is churning out golems in a secret project to win WW2 while the federal government tries to track down creatures from folklore, but it just doesn't seem to deliver. Everything comes together at the end, in a way, but this sort of feels like one of the golems themselves - there's certainly movement, but there doesn't seem to be that spark of life. It kind of feels like Irvine came up with a hell of a first chapter, and then phoned it in from there. Some interesting ideas, but not a lot of interesting execution. ( )
  skolastic | Feb 2, 2021 |
Boy, it's a whirlwind thinking back on these novels. When reading they just flow right along, but looking back you see just how much you went thru, how complicated and intriguing the stories are. The Poet shows up again, the FBI, and more! ( )
  tmph | Sep 13, 2020 |
I read this for "Murder Most Foul": The Narrows by Michael Connelly which is part of a murder mystery series (Harry Bosch).

A FBI agent named Rachel Walling is trying to track down a serial killer called The Poet. She ends up joining forces with LAPD detective Harry Bosch.

I'm going to suggest that you just plug your nose and suffer through the first 35 percent of the book. Until Bosch and Rachel Walling meet the book reads as two different stories. It doesn't help matters that Connelly chose to write Bosch in first person and Rachel and The Poet in third person. Why do authors do this??? Just pick one style or the other, doing both in the same book is aggravating.

I have read about all of the Harry Bosch books, but purposely skipped over ones like this since I just didn't feel like reading about different characters. Based on others comments, I should probably have read Connelly's "The Poet" first, but eh, I don't think I'm missing much.

Harry is Harry in this one. A bit adrift since retiring from the LAPD. He is trying to get to know his daughter Maddie better and travels back and forth to Las Vegas to visit her, and his ex Eleanor Wish. When Harry is asked a special favor from an old friend's widow (we'll get to that below) he decides to investigate whether former FBI agent Terry McCaleb was murdered and if he was, why.

So Bosch looks into that why we go back and forth between his investigation and Rachel Walling being pulled from no man's land to see if she can give some insight into a series of murders that have been uncovered in the desert near Las Vegas.

I have to say that Connelly really missed a chance to show that he can write from a woman's POV. The third person POV for Rachel really doesn't give us a chance to get inside her head.

Also I wish that Connelly had given us a chance to get a POV or prologue from McCaleb. It seemed that Connelly was dissatisfied with the character and didn't know what to do with him. His life seemed sad and I recall not caring for his wife in the last one. All this book was provide a litany of complaints from fictional characters about how they were portrayed in the movie that was made about "Blood Work". Also did Connelly forget that Bosch and McCaleb had a falling out in the prior book with these two? Rightfully so I may add. Bosch acting like they were really good friends and getting angry about someone murdering McCaleb didn't even feel real. Hey remember when Bosch's partner was shot and killed and he acted like it was no big thing? Yeah. So this whole track down and avenge McCaleb was a bit of a reach for me.

I ready said how the changing POVs messed up the reading for me, so no need to go through that again. The book was slow and boring to start with too. It picks up when the cases converge. And by that point Connelly does away from shifting from Bosch too much and the book improves dramatically. I loved the twists of this case and getting into what causes The Poet to seek out a type of man and murder him.

The changing nature of the FBI post 9/11 was interesting to see too. And there's a curve thrown at us at the end that provides the answers to lingering questions about Terry. It would have been interesting to see what see Connelly could do with this character. Instead the characters from his series all seemed to suck so good riddance to them.

The ending leaves Bosch on a new path and alone again. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
This is another great one from Connelly. Harry Bosch's friend Terry McCaleb dies on his boat. Drops dead of a heart attack so it seems. But, it's not. Someone has diluted the medication Terry must take to prevent his heart transplant (Bloodwork) from rejection. ( )
  susandennis | Jun 5, 2020 |
I did not realize this was the second part of The Poet story. I wish I'd read the first before this book.

Story was...meh. Okay. ( )
  cgfaulknerog | May 28, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Michael Connellyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Cariou, LenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Larsson, EvaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rusconi, AnnaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
All they did was trade one monster for another. Instead of a dragon they now have a snake. A giant snake that sleeps in the narrows and bides its time until the moment is right and it can open its jaws and swallow someone down.
-John Kinsey, father of a boy lost in the narrows. Los Angeles Times, July 21,1956
Dedication
In memory of Mary McEvoy Connelly Lavelle, who kept six of us out of the narrows
First words
I think maybe I only know one thing in this world.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Weaving lines of poetry into his gruesome crimes, the serial killer known to millions as the Poet returns. Rachel Walling, the FBI agent who years earlier had tried to track him down, has not forgotten him, and neither has former LAPD detective Harry Bosch who receives a call from an old friend whose husband had recently died. Even though his death appeared natural, the man's ties to the hunt for the Poet make Harry look twice, inevitably placing him in the path of the most ruthless and ingenious murderer in Los Angeles' history.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.77)
0.5
1 4
1.5 3
2 27
2.5 14
3 203
3.5 81
4 397
4.5 14
5 132

Hachette Book Group

4 editions of this book were published by Hachette Book Group.

Editions: 0446611646, 0446699543, 158621635X, 0316000736

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 155,806,867 books! | Top bar: Always visible