HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Fool's Fate (2003)

by Robin Hobb

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Tawny Man (3), Realm of the Elderlings (9)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
5,005672,222 (4.31)1 / 108
Fantasy. Fiction. HTML:“Fantasy as it ought to be written . . . Robin Hobb’s books are diamonds in a sea of zircons.”—George R. R. Martin 

FitzChivalry Farseer has become firmly ensconced in the queen’s court. Along with his mentor, Chade, and the simpleminded yet strongly Skilled Thick, Fitz strives to aid Prince Dutiful on a quest that could secure peace with the Outislands—and win Dutiful the hand of the Narcheska Elliania.
 
The Narcheska has set the prince an unfathomable task: to behead a dragon trapped in ice on the isle of Aslevjal. Yet not all the clans of the Outislands support their effort. Are there darker forces at work behind Elliania’s demand? Knowing that the Fool has foretold he will die on the island of ice, Fitz plots to leave his dearest friend behind. But fate cannot so easily be defied.
 
Praise for Robin Hobb and Fool’s Fate
 
“[Robin] Hobb’s rich, vibrant and unique world [is] filled with sentient ships, magical beasts, and fascinating characters. . . . Highly recommended.”Library Journal
 
“Rich, enchanting fantasy from one of today’s best practitioners . . . reminiscent of Ursula Le Guin’s The Other Wind [and] Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series.”BookPage.
… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

» See also 108 mentions

English (61)  Italian (2)  Dutch (1)  Norwegian (1)  All languages (65)
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
ritorno dei draghi
morte del matto
matrimonio di Fitz ( )
  LLonaVahine | May 22, 2024 |
This was a pretty good end to this trilogy, and to the story as a whole. The story is not as engrossing as others, but is more epic in scope, which was an interesting change after reading books with lots of intense, pressing events. Overall, I'd suggest Robin Hobb to people who like fantasy or long series, but not as a general author for people who like to read. ( )
  mrbearbooks | Apr 22, 2024 |
Kirjutada Hobb oskab. Kõik tema tegelased on päris, kohad on päris, juhtunu on enamjaolt põhjendatud ja loogine, aga ... Oh jah. Tegelikult mulle Hobb väga meeldib, aga Tawny Mani sari on isegi tema kohta ebainimlikult veniv. Viimane raamat on parim -- kogu sarja sündmustik ongi reaalselt 75% ulatuses siia kokku surutud (mis tähendab, et põnevaks läheb umbes poole raamatu pealt :P) Ja kui lahti läheb, siis ikka nii, et hoia alt. Nautisin sajaga.
Kahjuks ei jäänud muidugi märkamata, et niipea, kui sündmustikuks läheb, hakkavad tegelaste käitumisse ja juhtuvasse mingid napakad ebaloogilisused sisse lipsama. Pani kulmu kergitama küll, aga lugeda oli sellest hoolimata hea. ( )
  sashery | Jan 29, 2024 |
This is a great series, and well worth reading if you are in the mood for epic fantasy. Great character development and an engaging story.

After following these characters, specifically Fitz, for six books, I feel like the wrap-up at the end was a little dissapointing. I became seriously invested in the characters and I wanted more of a peek into the future, and more than the year she gave us. There was 15 years between the first and second trilogy, and I wanted a chapter at the end capturing another 15 years later… Oh well. ( )
  PurplOttr | Dec 1, 2023 |
Volume 3 in the Tawny Man trilogy, this continues where the second volume left off. After a slow buildup, during which Fitz remains at odds with the Fool and feels guilty about his scheming with Chade to leave the Fool behind - because he doesn't want the Fool's prediction to come true that if he goes on the quest to kill the dragon in the ice, he will suffer an awful death - Fitz embarks with Prince Dutiful's fleet. Again, this part of the story is slowly developed with emphasis on Thick's seasickness. Eventually they reach the island where the dragon is entombed in a glacier, and the ensuing conflict works itself out. The main characters persist in being annoyingly obtuse about what has clearly been going on since volume 2, bearing in mind the spying on the narcheska by Fitz where it was obvious that she and her uncle were acting under duress - the absence of certain family members and other anomalies when the travellers arrive at her settlement in this book makes it clear that a hostage situation is certainly going on. It is an annoying feature of both Farseer trilogies that characters whom we are told repeatedly are smart actually appear to be as thick as two short planks.

To avoid spoilers, I won't say any more about the plot. The tension was maintained well after the expedition reached the island. The story is a culmination not only of the whole Red Ship War plotline from the first trilogy, but also of the return of the dragons from the Liveship Trader trilogy. The Fool accepts that his sacrifice is necessary to bring about a future in which humans are forced to coexist with huge intelligent predators and will therefore not be the dominant force over the natural world that they are in the real world. All interesting ideas. But the development of Fitz from the arrested position he has remained in since sinking the emotions from his most painful memories into Girl on a Dragon in book 3 of the earlier trilogy, to a fully present individual who faces up to his responsibilities requires several plot contrivances I could not quite accept.

All right, perhaps he is a man who has a deep need for a stable home life with a wife and children, but after 16 years apart, it seems unlikely that his finally getting together with Molly can really work out. It was a bit too saccharine and, in the crass way he approaches her in front of her children, rather cringe worthy. Plus we lose Burrich just as he might be about to accept his Wit and be reconciled with his son, Swift - in a development analogous to the similarly convenient disposal of Kyle at the end of the Liveship Traders. Also, after Fitz's being so indispensable to the royal family that they are treating him with their usual cavalier attitude, and his singularly failing to protect his daughter from the same exploitation, he asserts himself, is called King Fitz by them - and is then allowed to retire to a bucolic existence in the country? I found all this unconvincing.

After the main emotional climax which left me rather detached in contrast to the loss Fitz experienced in the first volume of the trilogy, there is a rather dragged out conclusion in which just about every loose end is tied up including the ones I have trouble with, and we get the 'some of them lived happily ever after' ending. However, in view of the fact that there is now an ongoing trilogy that returns to the story of Fitz and the Fool, maybe it isn't as anodyne as it appears here. ( )
  kitsune_reader | Nov 23, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robin Hobbprimary authorall editionscalculated
Howe, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jewell, LaurieDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Santikko, SauliTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Youll, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
To Pi.
First words
The White Prophet's premise seems simple.
-- Prologue
Sometimes it seems unfair that events so old can reach forward through the years, sinking claws into one's life and twisting all that follows it.
-- Chapter One
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Fantasy. Fiction. HTML:“Fantasy as it ought to be written . . . Robin Hobb’s books are diamonds in a sea of zircons.”—George R. R. Martin 

FitzChivalry Farseer has become firmly ensconced in the queen’s court. Along with his mentor, Chade, and the simpleminded yet strongly Skilled Thick, Fitz strives to aid Prince Dutiful on a quest that could secure peace with the Outislands—and win Dutiful the hand of the Narcheska Elliania.
 
The Narcheska has set the prince an unfathomable task: to behead a dragon trapped in ice on the isle of Aslevjal. Yet not all the clans of the Outislands support their effort. Are there darker forces at work behind Elliania’s demand? Knowing that the Fool has foretold he will die on the island of ice, Fitz plots to leave his dearest friend behind. But fate cannot so easily be defied.
 
Praise for Robin Hobb and Fool’s Fate
 
“[Robin] Hobb’s rich, vibrant and unique world [is] filled with sentient ships, magical beasts, and fascinating characters. . . . Highly recommended.”Library Journal
 
“Rich, enchanting fantasy from one of today’s best practitioners . . . reminiscent of Ursula Le Guin’s The Other Wind [and] Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series.”BookPage.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.31)
0.5
1 7
1.5
2 21
2.5 8
3 139
3.5 43
4 458
4.5 73
5 618

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 207,071,231 books! | Top bar: Always visible