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How to Build a Time Machine (2002)

by Paul Davies

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473841,227 (3.74)7
Is time travel possible? According to internationally acclaimed physicist and science writer Paul Davies, the answer is definitely yes. But if we can travel in time, surely we can glimpse the future and act to change it? Or alter the past, creating all sorts of bizarre paradoxes?
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» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
If you're serious about sci-fi then you should probably read this book, it explains some of the science behind time and space in a concise and readable way. (It'll be of especial interest to fans of The Doctor. Allons-y!) ( )
  eenerd | Sep 29, 2015 |
Non sono un ottimo lettore di divulgazione scientifica, sopratutto quando questa è visionaria, improbabile e lontata dalla mia vita come questa relativa ai viaggi nel tempo. A mia parziale discolpa, il libro è arrivato in regalo da IBS, non l'avrei altrimenti mai acquistato.
D. ci prova ad essere simpatico, e a volte lo è. Tende a facilitare l'argomento, e a volte ci riesce.
Rimane il fatto che stiamo parlando di ipotesi che costituiscono un divertissement per i fisici, e questi si divertono con cose difficilissime, astruse, improbabili e di relativa utilita'. Un po' come tutti noi, ma io ho una formazione umanistica :-) ( )
  bobparr | Dec 14, 2014 |
An amusing, short, well written intro to the aspects of Relativity relating to time travel. ?Yes time travel. Written for some one with no more than a high school science education, it contains no scary equation. If you have a degree in physics, you will find it a tad boring. ( )
  bke | Mar 30, 2014 |
Why did I buy this book? It is a waste of my time and my money.

This jerk Paul Davies is not a scientist. He studied in science and had a higher education, but his view is corrupted by religious bullshit that you could smell his religious bullshit while reading this crap book.

He had turned to the dark side by accepting money from the anti-science Templeton Funcation. And he put bullshit mixed with what he science education.

It is just poision, not knowledge, that comes from reading his work.

Here is a quote from wiki on this jerk.

"The Edge Foundation presented a criticism of Davies's article written by Jerry Coyne, Nathan Myhrvold, Lawrence Krauss, Scott Atran, Sean Carroll, Jeremy Bernstein, PZ Myers, Lee Smolin, John Horgan, Alan Sokal and a response by Davies beginning I was dismayed at how many of my detractors completely misunderstood what I had written. Indeed, their responses bore the hallmarks of a superficial knee-jerk reaction to the sight of the words "science" and "faith" juxtaposed.[2] Richard Dawkins[3] and Victor J. Stenger[4] have also criticised Davies' public stance on science and religion."

I want my money back! ( )
  XOX | Jan 9, 2011 |
Perhaps it was inevitable that my fondness for novels involving time travel would lead me to this slim but fascinating non-fiction work by physicist, Paul Davies. Despite the provocative title, Davies doesn’t actually give step-by-step instructions for building a time machine in your garage, more’s the pity. But he does explain in plain English why we’re already time travelers (moving toward the future at the stately pace of one second per second) and how the universe just might allow us to do far more—eventually. Want to get to Year 3000 in a hurry? Build a rocket that can attain 99.999999999% of the speed of light and you’ll be there in six months. Want to get back now from then, or visit some other time that relative to now is in the past? You’ll need a wormhole and Davies provides helpful, if daunting instructions for building one. If a traveler from the future ever does show up, don’t be surprised if he’s got a copy of this book in his back pocket. ( )
1 vote SaraPoole | Aug 10, 2009 |
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Is time travel possible? According to internationally acclaimed physicist and science writer Paul Davies, the answer is definitely yes. But if we can travel in time, surely we can glimpse the future and act to change it? Or alter the past, creating all sorts of bizarre paradoxes?

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