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Waiter Rant: Thanks for the Tip--Confessions of a Cynical Waiter

by Steve Dublanica

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1,2358512,862 (3.41)64
Taken from the popular blog, WaiterRant.net, tells the story from the server's point of view about customer stupidity, arrogance, misbehavior and even human grace.
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» See also 64 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 85 (next | show all)
Interesting to see yourself as a customer from a waiter's perspective.

Enjoyable read. ( )
  avdesertgirl | Aug 22, 2021 |
adult nonfiction. Sick of corruption, the author quits seminary school to join the healthcare industry, but after struggling under similar circumstances, he decides to take a job as a waiter until he figures out what he wants to do next. One year turns into 7 years, and after successfully blogging about his experiences he successfully transitions into a writer. Loads of insight about the waiting profession as well as about life itself and the personal choices we all make. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
A waiter's look at life as a server in upscale New York restaurants. Fast-paced, some language, but overall a very enjoyable read. Learn why you should avoid restaurants on a holiday, read some of the sad stories of customers (who knew the waiters really noticed us?); feel elated when he gets back at rude ones. Based on the blog he began while waiting tables. A very well-written, witty tale that sucks in the reader and makes you sorry when the story ends. (And yes, he's at work on a sequel.)
  Chark | Jun 8, 2021 |
I just finished this book because I thought it would be a funny read. It is, particularly to one who has actually waited tables. As one who hasn't, I thought he came off as an arrogant, whiny person. I want to say POS, which doesn't mean "point of sale", but he probably isn't one. The book was very quick and to his point. ( )
  Jimbookbuff1963 | Jun 5, 2021 |
It's a little preachy and more of a memoir than "Confessions of..." but it's a good look into being a waiter and not being a terrible customer.

( )
  SSBranham | Sep 17, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 85 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Steve Dublanicaprimary authorall editionscalculated
Miller, Dan JohnNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This book is dedicated to my mother, my father, and everyone who's ever waited tables.
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I'm a waiter.
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Taken from the popular blog, WaiterRant.net, tells the story from the server's point of view about customer stupidity, arrogance, misbehavior and even human grace.

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Average: (3.41)
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