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Ten Little Indians (2003)

by Sherman Alexie

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1,2872414,002 (3.95)66
Fiction. Literature. Short Stories. HTML:

Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist: A "stellar collection" of stories about navigating life off the reservation, filled with laughter and heartbreak (People).
In these lyrical, affectionate tales from the author of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian and The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, characters navigate the crossroads of culture, battle stereotypes, and find themselves through everything from politics to basketball. Richard, the narrator of "Lawyer's League," grows up in Seattle, the son of "an African American giant who played defensive end for the University of Washington Huskies" and "a petite Spokane Indian ballerina." A woman is caught in a restaurant when a suicide bomb goes off in "Can I Get a Witness." And Estelle Walks Above (n√©e Estelle Miller), studies her way off the Spokane Indian Reservation and goes on to both enjoy and resent the company of the white women of Seattle‚??who see her as a shamanic genius, and look to her for guidance on everything from sex and fashion to spirituality.

These and the other "warm, revealing, invitingly roundabout stories" in Ten Little Indians run the gamut from earthy wit to sobering emotional truth, mapping the outer reaches of the human heart (The New York Times Book Review).

From a New York Times‚??bestselling and National Book Award‚??winning author, these tales, "rambunctious and exuberant, bristle with an edgy and mordant humor" (Chicago Tribune).

This ebook features an illustrated biography including rare photos from the author's personal collectio… (more)

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» See also 66 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
I'm still trying to figure out how to say this:

The thing I like best about short story collections (by a single author), if they're written well and compiled well, is the feeling I get, after reading each story, of comprehending an intimate secret the author needed me to understand. Poetry and novels both can (and do) knock me out, but there's something about the short story that can really get into my blood.

I am in love with this book. I couldn't get enough of it while I was reading it. It accompanied me almost everywhere I went this weekend, and when I thought maybe, for social reasons (and reducing the weight of my purse from being a lethal weapon), I should leave it at home for just a few hours, I obsessed over its absence like a phantom limb or shiny, new lover. I held it like a teddy bear going to sleep at night. I wanted to absorb it into my skin, and I feel this immense sense of guilt for refiling it back onto the bookshelf. I'd rather frame it.

Every story contains characters and situations that are tender, profane, and hilarious all at once, and each constantly evaded my expectations by achieving something far greater than anything I could have imagined. I'm not much for spoilers though I hate to not discuss every story for its brilliance, but it seems a little much to tally everything I loved about each story here. I don't recall enjoying The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven as much, but it has been several years and this experience has caused me to seriously consider rereading it.

I think you should read this book. ( )
  LibroLindsay | Jun 18, 2021 |
Awesome collection of short stories.
  Reyesk9 | Sep 23, 2019 |
"What You Pawn..." - If the idea of countdowns or running of out time makes you anxious, this short story might make the sweat bead on your brow just a little. The main protagonist, Jackson Jackson, spots his grandmother Agnes's stolen powwow regalia in a pawnshop window. She had lost her battle with breast cancer so the regalia is all that the grandson would have left of her...if he can get it back. The shop owner makes a deal to sell back the regalia for $1,000. There is only one problem. No one Jackson Jackson knows has $1,000. As an additional gesture of kindness, the pawnshop owner gives the grandson twenty bucks and twenty-four hours to come up with the rest of the cash. The clock is ticking, however the twenty immediately vanishes in the form of "three bottles of imagination." It might infuriate the reader but subsequently every time Jackson comes into money it is frittered away on something else. Hamburgers vomited back up. Losing lottery tickets. A cigar that will only burn away to nothing. Drinks with strangers. A round for everyone at the bar. But it is the kindness of strangers that gives our hero a break.

"the Life and Times of Estelle Walks Above" - A man looks back at his childhood to paint a picture of his mother, Estelle. As a member of the Spokane Indian tribe and a force to be reckoned with, Estelle was by turns someone to admire and someone to avoid. Sounds like practically every mother I know. She spent most of her lift as a spiritual guru to white women as she adores their culture over her own. ( )
  SeriousGrace | Jun 14, 2019 |
So in writing a review for this, I should acknowledge the allegations against Alexie (which he says are correct, https://www.npr.org/2018/03/05/589909379/it-just-felt-very-wrong-sherman-alexies... and say that I believe the women who have come out with their stories. I also acknowledge the many critiques of Alexie's work surrounding alcoholism, the relationship to the reservation as a space, etc.

The stories themselves I think definitely align with those critiques of his work, which doesn't mean they're not compelling--he is a gifted storyteller (though obviously we have to consider the cost of his fame, especially over the women he's harassed,) and his voice is so strong in all the stories. I would recommend you read this and then maybe read a book by a Native woman, or several? Just use these stories as a jumping off point generally into the broader world of Native literature instead of returning again and again to Alexie. ( )
  aijmiller | Apr 14, 2019 |
An emotional and fulfilling book. ( )
  RekhainBC | Feb 15, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
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Please distinguish Sherman Alexie's Ten Little Indians: Stories (2003), from Agatha Christie's novel, And Then There Were None (1939), which sometimes appears under the same title as this work, and also from the play or any film or video adaptation of Christie's Work. Thank you.
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Fiction. Literature. Short Stories. HTML:

Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist: A "stellar collection" of stories about navigating life off the reservation, filled with laughter and heartbreak (People).
In these lyrical, affectionate tales from the author of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian and The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, characters navigate the crossroads of culture, battle stereotypes, and find themselves through everything from politics to basketball. Richard, the narrator of "Lawyer's League," grows up in Seattle, the son of "an African American giant who played defensive end for the University of Washington Huskies" and "a petite Spokane Indian ballerina." A woman is caught in a restaurant when a suicide bomb goes off in "Can I Get a Witness." And Estelle Walks Above (n√©e Estelle Miller), studies her way off the Spokane Indian Reservation and goes on to both enjoy and resent the company of the white women of Seattle‚??who see her as a shamanic genius, and look to her for guidance on everything from sex and fashion to spirituality.

These and the other "warm, revealing, invitingly roundabout stories" in Ten Little Indians run the gamut from earthy wit to sobering emotional truth, mapping the outer reaches of the human heart (The New York Times Book Review).

From a New York Times‚??bestselling and National Book Award‚??winning author, these tales, "rambunctious and exuberant, bristle with an edgy and mordant humor" (Chicago Tribune).

This ebook features an illustrated biography including rare photos from the author's personal collectio

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