HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Murder of Napoleon by Ben Weider
Loading...

The Murder of Napoleon

by Ben Weider

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1363131,645 (4)1

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 3 of 3
Napoleon's death was not without controversy and there is evidence that he may have been poisoned. As a fascinating sidelight to the story of Napoleon, it appears that Count Charles-Tristan de Montholon, an aide to Napoleon and a member of the "pre-Revolutionary aristocracy" poisoned him slowly with arsenic (a poison) on St. Helena (Weider, p. 33).

Napoleon, although it was widely known that he had suffered from physical ailments his entire life (it appears to be the scratching disease, scabies, Napoleon's Glands, Arno Karlen, p. 7), had nonetheless a legendary reputation for work; yet, he succumbed at the relatively young age of 51 thus at the very least his death should raise questions.

At the time of Napoleon's death, the arsenic poisoning went unnoticed and it was not until a Swedish researcher in 1955, Sten Forshufvud, reconstructed the accounts and medical evidence of Napoleon's death that a modern, forensic connection could be established determining that Napoleon was murdered. Montholon had a motive, he was attached to the pre-Revolutionary aristocracy, and he appeared to be an agent of Count d'Artois, brother of King Louis XVIII, and later Charles X in the restored French monarchy who hated the Revolutionary Napoleon (Weider, pp. 144, 254).

Napoleon himself may have sensed something was amiss in his last days. Six days before his death he directed:

"After my death, which cannot be far off. I want you to open my body. . . . I want you to remove my heart, which you will put in spirits of wine and take to Parma, to my dear Marie-Louise [Napoleon's second wife]. . . . I recommend that you examine my stomach particularly carefully; make a precise, detailed report on it, and give it to my son. . . . I charge you to overlook nothing in this examination. . . . I bequeath to all the ruling families the horror and shame of my last moments."

(Wieder, preface).
1 vote gmicksmith | Nov 8, 2009 |
Considering the fact that Ben Weider was a contributor to this & Assassination at St. Helena Revisited, this [earlier] work has a completely different writing style than his later works making it a lot easier to read. I find it surprising, however, that Forshfvud had not written his account until much later as he had done the preliminary work that was to bring about the conclusions of the Emperor’s death.
All of the people Forshfvud had met while researching his work were enthralled with Napoleon. (Where are these people & where can I meet them??? Mon Dieu, it must be nice to meet & know people that have similar interests as one’s own!)
Overall, the book is a nice prelude to Forshufvud’s Who Killed Napoleon? & Sokoloff’s Napoleon: A Doctor’s Biography, which are always included in the bibliography of the most respectable works of one of the most remarkable people to have lived in the past three hundred years. ( )
  TheCelticSelkie | Sep 29, 2006 |
Considering the fact that Ben Weider was a contributor to this & Assassination at St. Helena Revisited, this [earlier] work has a completely different writing style than his later works making it a lot easier to read. I find it surprising, however, that Forshfvud had not written his account until much later as he had done the preliminary work that was to bring about the conclusions of the Emperor’s death.
All of the people Forshfvud had met while researching his work were enthralled with Napoleon. (Where are these people & where can I meet them??? Mon Dieu, it must be nice to meet & know people that have similar interests as one’s own!)
Overall, the book is a nice prelude to Forshufvud’s Who Killed Napoleon? & Sokoloff’s Napoleon: A Doctor’s Biography, which are always included in the bibliography of the most respectable works of one of the most remarkable people to have lived in the past three hundred years. ( )
  TheCelticSelkie | Sep 29, 2006 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312925484, Hardcover)

The history books say that Napoleon died of natural causes. Napoleon himself, expiring at 51 after a lifetime of robust health, suspected otherwise and ordered a thorough autopsy. His suspicions were well-founded. So clever was the crime, however, that until recent developments in forensic science, it was impossible to prove a case of murder, let alone name the killer. Now, the authors of this fascinating book assert, it has been done-by a brilliant man whose 20-year inquest, a feat of detection, has produced one of historys greatest surprises. What the critics say: "History at its most electrifying" - Newsweek "A nonfiction whodunit based on modern scientific technique" - New York Times "A spellbinding whodunit about one of history's greatest crimes" - History Book Club "Sensational ... as gripping as a detective novel yet scrupulously observant of historical fact" - Publishers Weekly "Thoroughly convincing... A major Odyssey in historical research" - Harold C. Deutsch, professor of military history, U.S. Army War College

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:28 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 4
4.5 2
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 134,738,971 books! | Top bar: Always visible