HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Girl with the Golden Eyes by Honoré de…
Loading...

The Girl with the Golden Eyes (1835)

by Honoré de Balzac

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
295554,447 (3.21)25
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 25 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
When the night came, he went to the meeting-place, and quietly let himself be blindfolded.

Raw as Honoré de Balzac is famed to be, this daring novella—never before published as a stand-alone book—is perhaps the most outlandish thing he ever wrote. While still concerned with the depiction of the underside of Parisian life, as is most of Balzac’s oeuvre, The Girl with the Golden Eyes considers not the working lives of the poor, but the sex lives of the upper crust.

In a nearly boroque rendering with erotically charged details as well as lush and extravagant language, The Girl with the Golden Eyes tells the story of a rich and ruthless young man in nineteenth century Paris caught up in an amorous entanglement with a mysterious beauty. His control slipping, incest, homosexuality, sexual slavery, and violence combine in what was then, and still remains, a shocking and taboo-breaking work.
**
The Art of The Novella Series

**Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Review

"I wanted them all, even those I'd already read."
—Ron Rosenbaum, *The New York Observer*

"Small wonders."
—*Time Out London*

"[F]irst-rate…astutely selected and attractively packaged…indisputably great works."
—Adam Begley, *The New York Observer*

"I’ve always been haunted by Bartleby, the proto-slacker. But it’s the handsomely minimalist cover of the Melville House edition that gets me here, one of many in the small publisher’s fine 'Art of the Novella' series."
—*The New Yorker*

"The Art of the Novella series is sort of an anti-Kindle. What these singular, distinctive titles celebrate is book-ness. They're slim enough to be portable but showy enough to be conspicuously consumed—tiny little objects that demand to be loved for the commodities they are."
—KQED (NPR San Francisco)

"Some like it short, and if you're one of them, Melville House, an independent publisher based in Brooklyn, has a line of books for you... elegant-looking paperback editions ...a good read in a small package."
—*The Wall Street Journal*

From the Trade Paperback edition.

About the Author

Honoré de Balzac was born in 1799 in Tours, France, into a bourgeois family (he added the aristocratic “de” in adulthood). Soon after graduating from the Sorbonne, he quit the practice of law and, impoverished in a Parisian garret, began his legendary habit of writing feverishly around the clock, fueled by dozens of cups of coffee. He quickly produced a series of increasingly successful novels. He also began a series of failed businesses—including a publishing house and a pineapple farm—that would leave him, despite increasing fame, in hair-raising and life-long debt; his house in Paris had a hidden exit to escape creditors. Balzac cemented his status as the father of realism with his 95-volume overview of French society, the stories, essays, and novels (including Pere Goriot, Eugénie Grandet, and Cousin Bette) he called La Comédie Humaine. In 1850 the famous man-about-town married a Polish countess with whom he’d conducted a romantic correspondence for 18 years, only to die three months later.

Charlotte Mandell has won the Modern Language Association Prize in translation. Among other titles she has translated for The Art of The Novella series are Gustave Flaubert’s A Simple Heart and Guy De Maupassant’s The Horla.
  GalenWiley | Apr 28, 2015 |
A Balzac novella that is part of the History of the Thirteen, although in this translation published as a standalone work. Its interest lies mainly in how shocking it is to imagine such a novel being written in the 19th century: a man seduces a young girl who is zealously guarded by her family, the girl makes him dress up in womenÛªs clothing and calls him by a woman‰Ûªs name when they make love, he returns to her the next night vowing to kill her for it but discovers she has already been murdered ‰ÛÒ by her other lover, who just happens to be his long lost half sister.

The plot driven portion of the novella is preceded by a lengthy and somewhat dull morphology of the exemplary specimens of the different stratas of Parisian life.

Overall enjoyable and worth reading but falls on the uneven side of Balzac. But worth reading nonetheless. ( )
  nosajeel | Jun 21, 2014 |
Oh good lord this is car-crash writing. The book begins with a prolonged rant, one that's too po-faced to be enjoyable and packed too full with easy stereotypes to be worth considering. The story following it is summarised in other reviews, but again, good lord. A powerful secret society, Circassian slaves, a mysterious and of course menacing mulatto, a poisoned duenna, love secrets of the Orient, suddenly-discovered blood ties (hey! you look like me! that can only mean that you're my half-sister!), love that dare not speak its name, premonitions of death, attempted murder, and far too late--given that it brings the book to an end--actual murder. The problem isn't simply that these elements are if not in themselves lurid used luridly, but that they are so often irrelevant and unnecessary, seemingly thrown together in a haphazard way: the writing feels as sloppy as it does silly. And the book isn't so bad it's fun, either, simply because it's surprisingly uninteresting; in fact despite its novella length I ended up skimming some of it. It's rubbish, it would have been rubbish in 1835, and that it was written by Balzac doesn't alleviate its rubbishness. In fact, I've tried to think of some aspect that does alleviate it, but if there is one it isn't plot, character, dialogue, diction, incident, organisation, creativity, or acuity.

If read it you must, it's free online. I suppose it might be worth having a look at for its oddness quotient; in fact I'll probably keep my copy because the book is so odd. Well, that taken in conjunction with its having one of those distinctive UK covers from the 70's: A naked woman with hippie hair and Carnaby Street make-up on the front and on the back the titillating blurb typical of those editions: 'The greatest French novelist of all time tells the story of a man enslaved by a strange girl who bewitched him, ignited his passion, and then revealed herself as captive to the most grotesque perversion known to human flesh.' Now, *that's* so bad it's fun; indeed, with the addition of an exclamation mark or two it would probably be the sort of thing that would have won Balzac's approval. ( )
3 vote bluepiano | Dec 26, 2013 |
A Balzac novella that is part of the History of the Thirteen, although in this translation published as a standalone work. Its interest lies mainly in how shocking it is to imagine such a novel being written in the 19th century: a man seduces a young girl who is zealously guarded by her family, the girl makes him dress up in women’s clothing and calls him by a woman’s name when they make love, he returns to her the next night vowing to kill her for it but discovers she has already been murdered – by her other lover, who just happens to be his long lost half sister.

The plot driven portion of the novella is preceded by a lengthy and somewhat dull morphology of the exemplary specimens of the different stratas of Parisian life.

Overall enjoyable and worth reading but falls on the uneven side of Balzac. But worth reading nonetheless. ( )
  jasonlf | Jul 31, 2011 |
Note: This is included in "Thirteen" by Balzac - see my review there! ( )
  JosephLYoung | Mar 16, 2011 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (18 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Balzac, Honoré deprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hofmannsthal, Hugo : vonsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original title
Information from the Swedish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
Information from the Swedish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0976658313, Paperback)

When the night came, he went to the meeting-place, and quietly let himself be blindfolded.

Raw as Honoré de Balzac is famed to be, this daring novella—never before published as a stand-alone book—is perhaps the most outlandish thing he ever wrote. While still concerned with the depiction of the underside of Parisian life, as is most of Balzac’s oeuvre, The Girl with the Golden Eyes considers not the working lives of the poor, but the sex lives of the upper crust.

In a nearly boroque rendering with erotically charged details as well as lush and extravagant language, The Girl with the Golden Eyes tells the story of a rich and ruthless young man in nineteenth century Paris caught up in an amorous entanglement with a mysterious beauty. His control slipping, incest, homosexuality, sexual slavery, and violence combine in what was then, and still remains, a shocking and taboo-breaking work.

The Art of The Novella Series

Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:01 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Settle in for a titillating tale of illicit passion, romantic entanglement, and murder. Honore de Balzac's novella The Girl With the Golden Eyes highlights the French writer's skillful ability to convey truths about the darker nature of humanity through perfectly wrought details and observations. A must-read for fans of classic European literature, or for readers who love a healthy dose of psychological complexity with their mysteries.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.21)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 5
2.5
3 18
3.5 3
4 8
4.5
5 5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,978,784 books! | Top bar: Always visible