HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Dark Tower (2004)

by Stephen King

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Dark Tower (7)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
10,693181641 (4.12)335
Fantasy. Fiction. HTML:Creating "true narrative magic" (The Washington Post) at every revelatory turn, Stephen King surpasses all expectation in the stunning final volume of his seven-part epic masterwork. Entwining stories and worlds from a vast and complex canvas, here is the conclusion readers have long awaited??breathtakingly imaginative, boldly visionary, and wholly entertaining.
Roland Deschain and his ka-tet have journeyed together and apart, scattered far and wide across multilayered worlds of wheres and whens. The destinies of Roland, Susannah, Jake, Father Callahan, Oy, and Eddie are bound in the Dark Tower itself, which now pulls them ever closer to their own endings and beginnings...and into a maelstrom of emotion, violence, and discove
… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 335 mentions

English (168)  Spanish (4)  Italian (2)  Norwegian (2)  Danish (2)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Dutch (1)  French (1)  All languages (181)
Showing 1-5 of 168 (next | show all)
I don't know that, having finally finished all 5000 pages or so of the Dark Tower series, I really am impressed as much as I think I maybe should be.

An odd statement, no?

I definitely liked this series. At times more, at times less. Coming to the end after several months of reading, on-again-off-again, the conclusion seems both appropriate... and disappointing. I do feel like I've missed out on some key insight, some key "Ah-ha!" I was supposed to get, given all I've heard about this series over the years.

And yet I am impressed. I did like it. There is a certain kind of satisfaction in the incompleteness of the ending, the... dare I say it... fallback... to the infinite regress. Perhaps. After all, the first book, written, what 35 years earlier, did start abruptly. You just dropped into the story.

I don't know, the more I think about it, the more tied together it all does in fact feel.

And yet... :)

I wish I could give this 4.5 stars. But I think, perhaps for a change, I will round up. ( )
  dcunning11235 | Aug 12, 2023 |
This book is the best I've ever read. Of course, it doesn't make sense without having read the entire series. I've only rarely read the same book twice, but this series, I will re-read. ( )
  RaggedyMe | Aug 12, 2023 |
Interminable. Execrable. Self-indulgent. ( )
  myshkin77 | Aug 10, 2023 |
there's a lot that wasn't quite right with this - namely roland acting out of character too many crucial times to count - but this ending felt so perfect and right that i can't help but be left with the feeling like i loved this. i didn't - i liked it a lot, mostly - but that ending soared. it somehow wasn't what i expected at all (at all, at all) but in retrospect it really is one of the only ways to end it, and definitely the right way. loved, loved, loved that last line and what led up to it.

what i didn't love about the book is partly confused with what i didn't like about the overall story in places, like how susannah is picked up and carried the way she is just doesn't feel right to me (but what do i know). things that were in all or most of the books. or things that felt unresolved (or were we supposed to assume that the black glass was destroyed on 9/11?). i didn't love the way susannah left, although i did love that they were all together again in the end. what an uplifting ending for stephen king, who doesn't usually indulge in sentimentality like that. but it felt good. what felt less good, to me, was the way it seemed like he was repeating the ending of it where they weren't going to remember their history or what brought them together. i guess he must have a reason for that, or that he's saying something since he's repeating it - maybe that trauma doesn't have to be the ties that are strongest? - but i'm not sure how i feel about those memories fading. i also didn't love the introduction of patrick at the end there, although i do think what he's saying with that character is important. throughout the last couple of books we're told over and over again that stephen king, as the writer, isn't in charge, that he's not really directing what happens. so i think it's important that he uses another artist - and one that has no words, is mute, at that - to really be the one who can be seen almost as a god in the story. i think he's making a powerful point about art here, but i don't love the character or his participation. probably it's bringing in someone so crucial at such a late point in the story that bothers me. what bothered me the very most, though, was how roland wasn't roland over and over again in this book. the most obvious time was when they meet the old man and roland gets taken in by jokes. jokes. roland. a man who hardly ever even smiles was undone by a series of bad jokes? it doesn't work for me. over and over susannah saw things that roland didn't, and she's a gunslinger and perfectly capable in her own right, but no way roland didn't notice those things. it just doesn't work for me.

still, none of those things are really what i'm left with. i found that throughout this journey i didn't even mind the vampires, which are one of my least favorite things to read about. especially when i thought of them more as metaphoric vampires, which tracks with all kinds of ways governments or people in power take from the people they're supposed to be representing. it's not my favorite way to talk about that, but it worked. and i really enjoyed seeing some characters from other books reappear here, and just the way this entire story is an umbrella for basically everything else he writes. i can see why he talked of retirement once this was done, but i'm glad he kept going. i also really really loved the way he inserted himself into the story, and how it wasn't indulgent, but just so fun and interesting. there's a lot of really great stuff he did here. i'm so glad i finally read these.

"Anyone who doesn't think the imagination can kill you is a fool." ( )
  overlycriticalelisa | Jul 7, 2023 |
Not much to say about the end of such an epic tale. This certainly a long part of the story but hard to put down. You get so lost as the members of our beloved ka tet grow closer to the tower, it's impossible to not be fascinated and drawn to their hope and fear, kind of like the draw of the Crimson King himself. I can't say there is a happy ending, or even a satisfying ending, but it does feel like the right ending, after all is said and done, there can be no other ending. So to Stephen King I say thankya. I feel we were well met ( )
  Crystal199 | Feb 24, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 168 (next | show all)
N 1970, when he was 22, Stephen King wrote a sentence he liked: ''The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.'' It's an innocent sentence -- pulpy and suggestive -- but it grew to become a monster. As the first line in the ''Dark Tower'' series, it begins a story King intended to be the longest popular novel in history. With the publication of ''The Dark Tower VII,'' the series has topped the 4,000-page mark and, mercifully, reached its conclusion.
added by stephmo | editNew York Times, Michael Agger (Oct 17, 2004)
 
King's "The Dark Tower" is the culmination of a saga that spans 3,000 pages, seven primary volumes, at least 15 ancillary ones and more than three decades of effort on the part of its author.
 

» Add other authors (27 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
King, Stephenprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bergner, WulfTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whelan, MichaelIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Not hear? When noise was everywhere! it tolled / Increasing like a bell. Names in my ears / Of all the lost adventurers, my peers -- / How such a one was strong, and such was bold, / And such was fortunate, yet each of old / Lost, lost! one moment knelled the woe of years. // There they stood, ranged along the hillsides, met / To view the last of me, a living frame / For one more picture! In a sheet of flame / I saw them and I knew them all. And yet / Dauntless the slug-horn to my lips I set, / And blew. 'Childe Roland to the Dark Tower came.' -- Robert Browning, "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came"
I was born / Six-gun in my hand, / behind a gun/ I'll make my final stand. -- Bad Company
What have I become? / My sweetest friend / Everyone I know / Goes away in the end / You could have it all / My empire of dirt / I will let you down / I will make you hurt. -- Trent Reznor
Dedication
He who speaks without an attentive ear is mute. Therefore, Constant Reader, this final book in the Dark Tower cycle is dedicated to you. Long days and pleasant nights.
First words
Pere Don Callahan had once been the Catholic priest of a town, 'Salem's Lot had been it's name, that no longer existed on any map.
Quotations
He was aware that his hands had rolled themselves into fists, but only because he could feel his carefully cared-for nails biting into his palms.
And will I tell you that these three lived happily ever after? I will not, for no one ever does. But there was happiness. And they did live.
A man who can't bear to share his habits is a man who needs to quit them.
Do any of us, except in our dreams, truly expect to be reunited with our hearts' deepest loves, even when they leave us only for minutes, and on the most mundane of errands? No, not at all. Each time they go from our sight we in our secret hearts count them as dead. Having been given so much, we reason, how could we expect not to be brought as low as Lucifer for the staggering presumption of our love?
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Fantasy. Fiction. HTML:Creating "true narrative magic" (The Washington Post) at every revelatory turn, Stephen King surpasses all expectation in the stunning final volume of his seven-part epic masterwork. Entwining stories and worlds from a vast and complex canvas, here is the conclusion readers have long awaited??breathtakingly imaginative, boldly visionary, and wholly entertaining.
Roland Deschain and his ka-tet have journeyed together and apart, scattered far and wide across multilayered worlds of wheres and whens. The destinies of Roland, Susannah, Jake, Father Callahan, Oy, and Eddie are bound in the Dark Tower itself, which now pulls them ever closer to their own endings and beginnings...and into a maelstrom of emotion, violence, and discove

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.12)
0.5 7
1 38
1.5 6
2 107
2.5 31
3 346
3.5 74
4 823
4.5 84
5 1057

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 201,645,525 books! | Top bar: Always visible