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Murder in the Mews and Other Stories by…
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Murder in the Mews and Other Stories (1937)

by Agatha Christie

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Hercule Poirot Mystery (18)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,891305,783 (3.52)46
How did a woman holding a pistol in her right hand manage to shoot herself in the left temple? What was the link between a ghost sighting and the disappearance of top secret military plans? How did the bullet that killed Sir Gervase shatter a mirror in another part of the room? And should the beautiful Valentine Chantry flee for her life from the holiday island of Rhodes? Hercule Poirot is faced with four mystifying cases - each a miniature classic of characterisation, incident and suspense.… (more)

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» See also 46 mentions

English (25)  Spanish (2)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Swedish (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (30)
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
The four stories in "Murder in the Mews" all work as puzzles, and – at a length hovering somewhere between short story and novel – manage to incorporate enough shades of character without ever tapping the well dry.

There’s nothing groundbreaking here, no, but as an example of “classic era” Christie, "Murder in the Mews" is not too shabby. The title story is perhaps the most engaging, with a murder plot that will keep you guessing. "The Incredible Theft" and "Triangle at Rhodes" are more opaque mysteries, focussing as much on character and ambience, which makes for a surprisingly good read. "Dead Man’s Mirror" – a retelling of an earlier Poirot short story, "The Submarine Plans" (which, poor thing, is now erased from most Poirot collections due to redundancy) – is my least favourite, failing to engage me for unknown reasons. However it is the most typically ‘Christie’ of the bunch – with a country house full of eccentrics – and there are some lovely pseudo-supernatural touches in for good measure.

Poirot ranking: 29th out of 38. ( )
  therebelprince | Dec 14, 2019 |
Four short stories featuring Poirot. Don't have a favorite as each one was a good read. Cant read enough of Christie! ( )
  loraineo | Jun 23, 2019 |
The four stories in "Murder in the Mews" all work as puzzles, and – at a length hovering somewhere between short story and novel – manage to incorporate enough shades of character without ever tapping the well dry.

There’s nothing groundbreaking here, no, but as an example of “classic era” Christie, "Murder in the Mews" is not too shabby. The title story is perhaps the most engaging, with a murder plot that will keep you guessing. "The Incredible Theft" and "Triangle at Rhodes" are more opaque mysteries, focussing as much on character and ambience, which makes for a surprisingly good read. "Dead Man’s Mirror" – a retelling of an earlier Poirot short story, "The Submarine Plans" (which, poor thing, is now erased from most Poirot collections due to redundancy) – is my least favourite, failing to engage me for unknown reasons. However it is the most typically ‘Christie’ of the bunch – with a country house full of eccentrics – and there are some lovely pseudo-supernatural touches in for good measure.

Poirot ranking: 29th out of 38. ( )
  therebelprince | Oct 30, 2018 |
I didn't expect this, the next in my chronological read of Christie's Hercule Poirot series, to be a collection of short stories but there you are. The title refers only to the first story, where a young widow is found dead of apparent suicide in a locked room but suspicion quickly mounts that her death was murder. The ending has the characteristic Christie twist that makes her mysteries a delight to read.

The second story, The Incredible Theft, features no murder at all, but rather the mysterious theft of a set of top-secret military plans from a government minister's home. This wasn't quite a locked-room mystery but nearly so. Poirot has the key, as always.

Dead Man's Mirror is another locked-room apparent suicide that turns out to be murder. Christie plays with fire by including two such similar puzzles in the same collection but manages to come up with two very different solutions without breaking a sweat.

And finally, Triangle in Rhodes finds Poirot on holiday, where the sun is hot and the tourist ménage à trois even hotter. Once again, though, all is not what it seems to the mere bystander, and it is up to Poirot to clear things up. ( )
1 vote rosalita | Apr 23, 2018 |
I've been enjoying listening to all the Agatha Christie audio books that I can find. This one is part of series of short stories. Recommended to any Poirot or Christie fan. ( )
  ktlavender | Jul 17, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (18 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Christie, Agathaprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fraser, HughNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hawthorne, Sir NigelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Laine, Anna-LiisaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Macartney, RobinCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Dead Man's Mirror: The flat was a modern one.
Murder in the Mews: "Penny for the guy, sir?"
Triangle at Rhodes: Hercule Poirot sat on the white sand and looked out across the sparkling blue water.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
aka Dead Man's Mirror. "The Incredible Theft" does not appear in earlier editions of the US version (Dead Man's Mirror). Please do not combine.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

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Book description
Contains "Dead Man's Mirror," "Murder in the Mews," "The Incredible Theft," and "Triangle at Rhodes". "The Incredible Theft" does not appear in earlier editions of the US version (Dead Man's Mirror).
Haiku summary
Hercule Poirot solves
four mysteries, including
theft and foul murder.
(passion4reading)

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