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The King of Children by Betty Jean Lifton
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The King of Children

by Betty Jean Lifton

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1122161,510 (4.22)11
  1. 00
    Milkweed by Jerry Spinelli (meggyweg)
    meggyweg: Janusz Korczak is a minor character in "Milkweed."
  2. 00
    Ghetto Diary by Janusz Korczak (meggyweg)
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» See also 11 mentions

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Biography of Janusz Korczak who accompanied 200 children from Warsaw Ghetto to Treblinka; all died
  Folkshul | Jan 15, 2011 |
I found this biography very well-written, detailed and moving. Janusz Korczak is barely known in the West today, and those who have heard of him usually only know of the manner of his death: he followed the children in his orphanage to Treblinka rather than abandon them and save his own life. But there is a lot more to Korczak than the way he died, as this book shows. You really get a sense of the "whole man," and the times in which he lived. He was a brilliant doctor, pedagogue, children's writer and humanitarian, and he was also very eccentric, prickly with most adults, and had a highly developed sense of humor. The world needs more people like Korczak, and more biographies like this one. ( )
  meggyweg | Mar 6, 2009 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Betty Jean Liftonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lösch, AnnegreteTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Travail, RenéTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wiesel, ElieIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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"The lives of great men are like legends--difficult by beautiful," Janusz Korczak wrote, and it was true of his. [Who was Janusz Korczak?]
He made his first moral decision at the age of five.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374181241, Hardcover)

This is the first English biography of Janusz Korczak, a Polish-Jewish doctor, writer and educator, who on 6th August, 1942, sacrificed his own safety by leading two hundred orphans onto the train to Treblinka where he perished with them. Korczak was one of the first advocates of children's rights. He pioneered progressive orphanages, founded a children's newspaper and testified for children in juvenile courts. For this work the author has drawn on Korczak's writings and on interviews with orphans he raised and trained. Betty Jean Lifton is also author of "Lost and Found: The Adoption Experience", "Children of Vietnam" and "A Place Called Hiroshima".

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:33 -0400)

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