HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium (1999)

by Robert Lacey, Danny Danziger

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,250517,083 (3.65)65
THE YEAR 1000 is a vivid evocation of how English people lived a thousand years ago - no spinach, sugar or Caesarean operations in which the mother had any chance of survival, but a world that knew brain surgeons, property developers and, yes, even the occasional group columnist. In the spirit of modern investigative journalism, Lacey and Danziger interviewed the leading historians and archaeologists in their field. In the year 1000 the changing seasons shaped a life that was, by our standards, both soothingly quiet and frighteningly hazardous - and if you survived, you could expect to grow to just about the same height and stature as anyone living today. This exuberant and informative book concludes as the shadow of the millennium descends across England and Christendom, with prophets of doom invoking the spectre of the Anti-Christ. Here comes the abacus - the medieval calculating machine - along with bewildering new concepts like infinity and zero. These are portents of the future, and THE YEAR 1000 finishes by examining the human and social ingredients that were to make for survival and success in the next thousand years.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 65 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
This entertaining and well-written book givees a real feel for every day life at the turn of the first millennium. Approached with a very light touch, the authors touch on the daily life and concerns of all sections of the population, whether hand-to-mouth villagers, men and women of God, soldiers or nobility. Their day-to-day problems and joys, their concerns for the future are all touched on the give a vivid portrait of life 1000 years ago. It's not a scholarly book, but one which is easily read in the course of a day , whetting the appetite for more. ( )
  Margaret09 | Apr 15, 2024 |
The author uses a calendar (The Julius Work Calendar) from about 1020 to provide structure and line drawings from the time for each month. He adds information from other sources and the book is interesting and informative (and occasionally a bit horrifying). ( )
  TanyaRead | Feb 14, 2024 |
I read through this for the second time over the weekend and found it to be a bit more “meh” than the first time I read it. A lot of the info was things I already knew and what I didn’t know wasn’t that interesting. ( )
  classyhomemaker | Dec 11, 2023 |
It took me far too long to finish this book. A very interesting, well researched look at the work the passing seasons brought in the year 1000.

Although some small sections hit stereotypes or now dated areas of research, it was still well worth the read, and I learned many new facts. ( )
  calenmarwen | May 29, 2023 |
Intriguing topic, focus on why white male hard work has made England such a wonderful country, and English a global language ( )
  JesseTheK | Jan 10, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robert Laceyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Danziger, Dannymain authorall editionsconfirmed
Gardner, GroverNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
To our partners and colleagues
at Cover magazine
First words
It was an oak tree that provided the ink, from a boil-like pimple growing out of its bark.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

THE YEAR 1000 is a vivid evocation of how English people lived a thousand years ago - no spinach, sugar or Caesarean operations in which the mother had any chance of survival, but a world that knew brain surgeons, property developers and, yes, even the occasional group columnist. In the spirit of modern investigative journalism, Lacey and Danziger interviewed the leading historians and archaeologists in their field. In the year 1000 the changing seasons shaped a life that was, by our standards, both soothingly quiet and frighteningly hazardous - and if you survived, you could expect to grow to just about the same height and stature as anyone living today. This exuberant and informative book concludes as the shadow of the millennium descends across England and Christendom, with prophets of doom invoking the spectre of the Anti-Christ. Here comes the abacus - the medieval calculating machine - along with bewildering new concepts like infinity and zero. These are portents of the future, and THE YEAR 1000 finishes by examining the human and social ingredients that were to make for survival and success in the next thousand years.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.65)
0.5
1 4
1.5 3
2 19
2.5 6
3 102
3.5 32
4 142
4.5 11
5 50

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 207,125,765 books! | Top bar: Always visible