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History of Rome, books 1-5 by Titus Livy
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History of Rome, books 1-5

by Titus Livy, Livy

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 15 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
"the models for that oratory which is to produce the greatest effect by securing the attention of hearers & readers, are to be found in Livy, Tacitus, Sallust, & most assuredly not in Cicero." - Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, 17 Jan. 1810 [PTJ:RS 2:153-154]

"your Latin & Greek should be kept up assiduously by reading at spare hours: and, discontinuing the desultory reading of the schools. I would advise you to undertake a regular course of history & poetry in both languages, in Greek, go first thro’ the Cyropaedia ... in Latin read Livy, Caesar, Sallust Tacitus, Cicero’s Philosophies, and some of his Orations, in prose ..." - Thomas Jefferson to Francis Eppes, 6 Oct. 1820

"we have now such excellent elementary books in every branch of science as to make , Start insertion,every, End, subject as plain as a teacher can make it. ... in Antient history the first 20. vols of the Universal history. / Gillies’s history of the world, / Gillies’s history of Greece. / Livy, Sallust, Caesar, Taeches, Suadonurs." - Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Echols, 23 May 1822

"for a course of Antient history therefore, of Greece and Rome especially, I should advise the usual suite of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Diodorus, Livy, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus and Dion, in their originals, if understood, and in translations if not." - Thomas Jefferson to George W. Lewis, 25 Oct. 1825
  ThomasJefferson | Jul 23, 2014 |
"the models for that oratory which is to produce the greatest effect by securing the attention of hearers & readers, are to be found in Livy, Tacitus, Sallust, & most assuredly not in Cicero." - Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, 17 Jan. 1810 [PTJ:RS 2:153-154]

"your Latin & Greek should be kept up assiduously by reading at spare hours: and, discontinuing the desultory reading of the schools. I would advise you to undertake a regular course of history & poetry in both languages, in Greek, go first thro’ the Cyropaedia ... in Latin read Livy, Caesar, Sallust Tacitus, Cicero’s Philosophies, and some of his Orations, in prose ..." - Thomas Jefferson to Francis Eppes, 6 Oct. 1820

"we have now such excellent elementary books in every branch of science as to make , Start insertion,every, End, subject as plain as a teacher can make it. ... in Antient history the first 20. vols of the Universal history. / Gillies’s history of the world, / Gillies’s history of Greece. / Livy, Sallust, Caesar, Taeches, Suadonurs." - Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Echols, 23 May 1822

"for a course of Antient history therefore, of Greece and Rome especially, I should advise the usual suite of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Diodorus, Livy, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus and Dion, in their originals, if understood, and in translations if not." - Thomas Jefferson to George W. Lewis, 25 Oct. 1825
  ThomasJefferson | Jul 23, 2014 |
"the models for that oratory which is to produce the greatest effect by securing the attention of hearers & readers, are to be found in Livy, Tacitus, Sallust, & most assuredly not in Cicero." - Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, 17 Jan. 1810 [PTJ:RS 2:153-154]

"your Latin & Greek should be kept up assiduously by reading at spare hours: and, discontinuing the desultory reading of the schools. I would advise you to undertake a regular course of history & poetry in both languages, in Greek, go first thro’ the Cyropaedia ... in Latin read Livy, Caesar, Sallust Tacitus, Cicero’s Philosophies, and some of his Orations, in prose ..." - Thomas Jefferson to Francis Eppes, 6 Oct. 1820

"we have now such excellent elementary books in every branch of science as to make , Start insertion,every, End, subject as plain as a teacher can make it. ... in Antient history the first 20. vols of the Universal history. / Gillies’s history of the world, / Gillies’s history of Greece. / Livy, Sallust, Caesar, Taeches, Suadonurs." - Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Echols, 23 May 1822

"for a course of Antient history therefore, of Greece and Rome especially, I should advise the usual suite of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Diodorus, Livy, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus and Dion, in their originals, if understood, and in translations if not." - Thomas Jefferson to George W. Lewis, 25 Oct. 1825
  ThomasJefferson | Jul 23, 2014 |
The author is said to have conceived his work not seriously as an historian, but from the more generous perspective of a writer. Often without naming the sources. An interesting example for today’s composers of dissertations.
  hbergander | Feb 11, 2014 |
Livy's "The Early History of Rome" is a fascinating book. I'm not too familiar with ancient history, but I have heard of the rape of Lucrezia, and knew that the name Virginia had something to do with Roman history, so it was nice to finally read the actual details (such as they are) about these people. Reading about the constant wars with Rome's neighbors gets a little tedious, but then that's what life was like then. Livy also sometimes throws in a little story that while not really part of Roman history, are interesting just as a glimpse of life. For example he tells of a vestal virgin brought up on some kind of sexual charge, who was acquitted with the stern warning to "dress less elegantly" and to "stop telling jokes." ( )
  Marse | Jul 17, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Titus Livyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Livymain authorall editionsconfirmed
de Sélincourt, AubreyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ogilvie, R. M.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The task of writing a history of our nation from Rome's earliest days fills me, I confess, with some misgiving, and even were I confident in the value of my work, I should hesitate to say so.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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This is Books 1-5 of Livy's History of Rome (Ab Urbe Condita) in translation, often called 'the Early History of Rome' or 'the Rise of Rome'. Do not combine it with editions of Ab Urbe Condita with a Latin text.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140441042, Mass Market Paperback)

Livy (c. 59 BC-AD 17) dedicated most of his life to writing some 142 volumes of history, the first five of which comprise The Early History of Rome. With stylistic brilliance, he chronicles nearly 400 years of history, from the founding of Rome (traditionally dated to 757 BC) to the Gallic invasion in 386 BC - an era which witnessed the reign of seven kings, the establishment of the Republic, civil strife and brutal conflict. Bringing compelling characters to life, and re-presenting familiar tales - including the tragedy of Coriolanus and the story of Romulus and Remus - The Early History is a truly epic work, and a passionate warning that Rome should learn from its history.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:42 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

"In Livy's epic history of Rome he unashamedly praised his country's virtues and urged against its excesses, in order to keep it great. He dedicated most of his life to writing some 142 volumes of history, the first five of which comprise The Early History of Rome." "With stylistic brilliance and historical imagination Livy (c. 59 BC - AD 17) brings alive the great characters and scenes from Rome's past, beginning with the foundation of Rome, through the history of the seven kings, the establishment of the Republic and its internal struggles, up to recovery after the Gallic invasion of the fourth century BC. He also vividly re-presents familiar legends and tales, including the story of Romulus and Remus."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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