HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Victory: The Reagan Administration's Secret Strategy That Hastened the Collapse of the Soviet Union

by Peter Schweizer

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
852322,720 (3.6)1
This explosive book chronicles why and how Ronald Reagan helped to bring down the Soviet Union. Based on exclusive interviews with key participants, including Caspar Weinberger, George Schultz, John Poindexter, Robert McFarlane, and William Clark, Peter Schweizer provides the riveting details of how the Reagan inner circle undermined the Soviet economy and its dwindling resource base to subvert the Kremlin's hold on its global empire. Using secret diplomacy, the administration dramatically reduced Soviet income while simultaneously driving Moscow to expend an increasing amount of precious assets. There was also an American initiative to provide covert aid to indigenous forces in Poland and Afghanistan to roll back Soviet power. Schweizer's compelling argument for the Reagan administration's calculated strategy is impossible to ignore.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 2 of 2
Scholarly review of the people and policies of the Reagan Administration to counter Soviet influence in the world. There were other reasons for the ultimate collapse of the Soviet Union besides the policies of the Reagan Administration, however the focus of Reagan and his advisors toward blocking Soviet aims and expansion was relentless, and certainly was a huge contributor to the breakup of the USSR. Schweizer explains how Reagan provided additional military support to Afghanistan to help lead to unsustainable soviet troop losses in that ongoing war, how our increases in military spending forced the Soviets to divert money from other needed programs. Additionally, Reagan political policies and restrictions on advanced technology exports impacted the modernization of soviet military and business. These influences ultimately contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. Left unsaid is that these same combined pressures, e.g., an already weakened domestic economy, increases in military spending, an unsustainable limited war in Afghanistan, Iraq, and now in the borders of Pakistan could lead to further pressure on our economy if our leaders fail to make the tough choices and take effective steps to resolve these problems.
( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
EDITED: In light of new information that I've gathered recently, I've decided to change my rating of this book. Apparently the information that Schweizer imparts in this book is mostly hokum. As such I've downgraded my rating of it to 1/2 star.

After the fall of the Soviet Union, there was a lot of discussion as to what was more responsible for it occurring: American policies or Mikhail Gorbachev's refusal to use force to maintain Russian hegemony. With Victory Peter Schweizer may not be in the group that says it was all American policies that brought down the Soviet threat, but he does put forward a convincing argument that U.S. foreign policy did speed up the Soviet downfall.

The gist of Schweizer's argument is that Reagan administration officials recognized that the Soviet economic system was inherently unstable and would be quick to fall apart if the right amount of pressure were applied. Entering the 1980s, the Soviet economy was staying afloat primarily because of its ability to export large amounts of oil and gold for a very high price. U.S. policy amounted to trying to bring down the price of each item so that the Soviets would have a difficult time earning enough foreign credits to import key goods. This would cause a crisis by forcing the Soviet government to either reduce the availability of consumer goods for the Soviet people, which would cause civil unrest or to reduce military spending, which would reduce the Soviets ability to compete with the U.S.

The Reagan administration accomplished this policy goal by taking the hard choice to cozy up to some unsavory regimes, like South Africa's Apartheid and the Saudi regimes, despite the large amount of grief it got them around the world and in the U.S. Reagan made the decision that rolling back Soviet power was the more important goal and that the U.S. could deal with these other repressive regimes once the Soviet threat had been dealt with.

Above all, this book shows the importance to any country's foreign policy of setting priorities with a clear hierarchy. You have to decide what the biggest threats are facing the country and deal with them first. A country that doesn't set its priorities cannot be said to have a foreign policy at all. ( )
  Bretzky1 | Jul 4, 2011 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

This explosive book chronicles why and how Ronald Reagan helped to bring down the Soviet Union. Based on exclusive interviews with key participants, including Caspar Weinberger, George Schultz, John Poindexter, Robert McFarlane, and William Clark, Peter Schweizer provides the riveting details of how the Reagan inner circle undermined the Soviet economy and its dwindling resource base to subvert the Kremlin's hold on its global empire. Using secret diplomacy, the administration dramatically reduced Soviet income while simultaneously driving Moscow to expend an increasing amount of precious assets. There was also an American initiative to provide covert aid to indigenous forces in Poland and Afghanistan to roll back Soviet power. Schweizer's compelling argument for the Reagan administration's calculated strategy is impossible to ignore.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.6)
0.5 1
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 1
4 4
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 208,661,595 books! | Top bar: Always visible