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Skinny Legs and All (1990)

by Tom Robbins

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,229442,394 (4.03)54
An Arab and a Jew open a restaurant together across the street from the United Nations... It sounds like the beginning of an ethnic joke, but it's the axis around which spins Tom Robbins's gutsy, fun-loving, and alarmingly provocative new novel, in which a bean can philosophizes, a dessert spoon mystifies, a young waitress takes on the New York art world, and a rowdy redneck welder discovers the lost god of Palestine-while the illusions that obscure humanity's view of the true universe fall away, one by one, like Salome's veils. Skinny Legs and Alldeals, in Robbins's audacious manner, with today's most sensitive issues- race, politics, marriage, art, religion, money, and lust. It weaves lyrically through what some call the "end days of our planet. Refusing to avert its gaze from the horrors of the apocalypse, it also refuses to let the alleged end of the world spoil its mood. And its mood is defiantly upbeat. In the gloriously inventive Tom Robbins style, here are characters, phrases, stories, and ideas that dance together on the page, wild and sexy, like Salome herself. Or was it Jezebel?… (more)
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» See also 54 mentions

English (43)  Italian (1)  All languages (44)
Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
I was assigned this book to read for my Humanities 130 class, about world’s religions a few semesters ago, and despite the fact that it too me nearly a year to finally get al the way through it, I wish that I had finished it during that semester, because my paper on it would have been so much better. But obviously I’m not meaning to talk about school.

This book is absolutely fantastic. I was sceptical about it to begin with, partly because one of the positive reviews on the back was from Playboy. Also, its unconventional and odd and eccentric… But it’s also beautiful. It’s surprisingly insightful and absolutely poetic. Tom Robbins is brilliant, and while I’m scared to say that I want to read more of his books in fear of being let down by them, I certainly intend to try.

This book is about a thousand different things. Its about art and beauty and sex. Its about religion and spirituality. Its about racism and toleration and j life. I really have no complaints about this book, I have nothing bad to say about it, and unless you have a problem with poetic imagery, brilliance, and intelligent ideas (and a few references to sex, but its not exactly dirty), I would completely suggest reading this one. Its so different, and I feel like I keep saying it, but it is beautiful.
( )
1 vote KaffinatedWitch | Oct 15, 2021 |
Middle East and Goddess worship, plight of artist, Painted Stick, Counch, Can of Beans, Spoon & Dirty Sock
  ritaer | May 29, 2020 |
Ein Jude und ein Araber eröffnen gemeinsam ein Restaurant gegenüber dem New Yorker UNO-Gebäude. Da solch ein Ort der Völkerverständigung militanten Fundamentalisten aller Seiten ein Dorn im Auge sein muß, gehen bald die Bomendrohungen ein ...
  Fredo68 | May 18, 2020 |
Robbins romps through this tale of a man-made Armageddon that doesn't quite come off, accompanied by his signature acerbic wit and multiple barbs aimed at the tyranny of religion.

Ripe with pervasive sexuality, by turns funny and acerbic, the story of Ellen Cherry Charles, frustrated artist and recoiling from a short and disastrous marriage, wanders across an American landscape in an Airstream RV disguised as a turkey, hangs out in a bar run by an Arab and a Jew in a wildly optimistic partnership, and winds up in Times Square on Superbowl Sunday, after the True Meaning of It All has just been revealed by a skinny teenager slithering out of a collection of purple silk scarves.

There's also an animate, vocal (and highly philosophical) can of pork and beans, side trips through the history of the world's great religions, and a street performer whose talent is to move while remaining motionless.

It's a wild ride. Just strap on your sexiest shoes and enjoy it. ( )
1 vote LyndaInOregon | Apr 5, 2020 |
Tom Robbins 5th book is highly acclaimed. ( )
  atufft | Jul 4, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
The Messiah will only come when he is no longer needed
--Franz Kafa
It's the end of the world as we know it (and I feel fine).
--R.E.M.
Dedication
For Alexa d'Avalon and Giny Ruffner and their pink shoes.
First words
This is the room of the wolfmother wallpaper. The toadstool motel you once thought a mere folk tale, a corny, obsolete, rural invention.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (1)

An Arab and a Jew open a restaurant together across the street from the United Nations... It sounds like the beginning of an ethnic joke, but it's the axis around which spins Tom Robbins's gutsy, fun-loving, and alarmingly provocative new novel, in which a bean can philosophizes, a dessert spoon mystifies, a young waitress takes on the New York art world, and a rowdy redneck welder discovers the lost god of Palestine-while the illusions that obscure humanity's view of the true universe fall away, one by one, like Salome's veils. Skinny Legs and Alldeals, in Robbins's audacious manner, with today's most sensitive issues- race, politics, marriage, art, religion, money, and lust. It weaves lyrically through what some call the "end days of our planet. Refusing to avert its gaze from the horrors of the apocalypse, it also refuses to let the alleged end of the world spoil its mood. And its mood is defiantly upbeat. In the gloriously inventive Tom Robbins style, here are characters, phrases, stories, and ideas that dance together on the page, wild and sexy, like Salome herself. Or was it Jezebel?

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