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The Tristan Betrayal by Robert Ludlum
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The Tristan Betrayal (2003)

by Robert Ludlum

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1,1371011,500 (3.31)3
In the fall of 1940, the Nazis are at the height of their power - France is occupied, Britain is enduring the Blitz and is under threat of invasion, America is neutral and Russia is in an uneasy alliance with Germany. Stephen Metcalfe, the younger son of a prominent American family, is a well-known man about town in occupied Paris. He's also a minor asset in the US's secret intelligence forces in Europe. Through a wild twist of fate, it falls to Metcalfe to instigate a bold plan that may be the only hope for what remains of the free world. Now he must travel to wartime Moscow to find, and possibly betray, a former lover - a fiery ballerina whose own loyalties are in question - in a delicate dance that could destroy all he loves and honours.… (more)

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
WW2 spy, romance and drama linked to 1991 peristroika in Russia and the attempts to remove Gorbachov because of his program of de-communising the country. Has some of the tension of the Bourne stories but a different theme so was refreshing. ( )
  ElizabethCromb | Mar 9, 2019 |
Average spy-thriller. Not written by Robert Ludlum as he died in 2001, but instead it is written by an unnamed ghostwriter. Since it is based on an outline written by Ludlum, it has a good premise. It is a fact that in the late 1930s, Stalin purged the high command of the Soviet Red Army. Ludlum proposes that Nazi Germany faked correspondence between Russian generals and German generals saying that the Russian generals would overthrow Stalin, and then they ‘allowed’ Russian intelligence to ‘discover’ this correspondence.

Second fact: Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed a peace accord shortly after that, and then Hitler attacked Russia. In retrospect, that appears to have been a very foolish move. Why not keep the peace until the war on the western front was secure? Ludlum proposes that American intelligence agents fed the Nazis faked Soviet Army data indicating that Stalin was secretly building up for an attack on Germany. Hitler decided to strike first.

This story purports to show how American intelligence fed this fake data to the Nazis. Unfortunately, the story is not well written. The American secret agent Stephen Metcalf keeps getting into unbelievable difficult places and is able to extract himself with unbelievable coincident. ( )
  ramon4 | Dec 4, 2016 |
The Tristan Betrayal is a departure from what I have come to expect from Robert Ludlum, which is probably why I enjoyed this novel so much. It is primarily an historical thriller taking place in Europe during World War II, with only loose tales to the modern day (1991) event that is occurring. In present time, with the Soviet Union is under siege by the hardliners who want to take control of the country, American Ambassador Stephen Metcalf is called upon to convince the one person who can prevent this from happening to stop it. Metcalf does this by relaying the tale of his youth when he was a spy for the United States prior to them joining the war effort in Europe. He has been given the assignment to have a former Russian lover of his to pass off falsified documents to her Gestapo boyfriend that suggests that the Soviets would be weak and be easy prey for the Germans to invade. The end result being Germany involved in a war on two fronts that they couldn’t win.

What generally turns me off from Ludlum is the utterly outlandish plot lines and the ridiculous conspiracies that his novels often devolve into. This novel had none of those things. The story line was plausible and intriguing. The plot unfolded in a logical manner. There was enough action to keep the story moving, even though it wasn’t central to the story. The characters were well-defined. Even though the twist at the end wasn’t much of a twist, and I had figured it out about half way through the novel, the ending was still satisfying. This is the best Ludlum novel I have read and I would recommend it to readers of thrillers and historical fiction.

Carl Alves – author of Reconquest: Mother Earth ( )
  Carl_Alves | Jul 30, 2014 |
### Review

'Master storyteller' is what they say in the advance publicity for the latest high-powered ripping yarn from Robert Ludlum, and who could disagree with that? He knows how to tell them, does Mr Ludlum, having had plenty of practice since he published The Scarlatti Inheritance back in 1971, and 23 books later he is still going strong, cranking up the narrative tension like the old pro he undoubtedly is. So here we are in 1940 in enemy occupied Paris and one Stephen Metcalfe, American man about town, has a plan to save the free world from Nazi tyranny. And away he goes to Moscow to track down a ballerina who was once his lover whom he must betray in order to carry out his plan. In 30 years, Ludlum has sold 220 million books.

### Product Description

In the fall of 1940, the Nazis are at the height of their power - France is occupied, Britain is enduring the Blitz and is under threat of invasion, America is neutral and Russia is in an uneasy alliance with Germany. Stephen Metcalfe, the younger son of a prominent American family, is a well-known man about town in occupied Paris. He's also a minor asset in the US's secret intelligence forces in Europe. Through a wild twist of fate, it falls to Metcalfe to instigate a bold plan that may be the only hope for what remains of the free world. Now he must travel to wartime Moscow to find, and possibly betray, a former lover - a fiery ballerina whose own loyalties are in question - in a delicate dance that could destroy all he loves and honours.
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  Hans.Michel | Sep 13, 2013 |
NIL
  rustyoldboat | May 28, 2011 |
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The sleek black limousine, with its polycarbonate-laminate bullet-resistant windows and its run-flat tires, its high-tech ceramic armor and dual-hardness carbon-steel armor plate, was jarringly out of place as it pulled into the Bittsevsky forest in the southwest area of the city.
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