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Women, Race, and Class (1981)

by Angela Y. Davis

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1,3681410,180 (4.36)24
A powerful study of the women's liberation movement in the U.S., from abolitionist days to the present, that demonstrates how it has always been hampered by the racist and classist biases of its leaders. From the widely revered and legendary political activist and scholar Angela Davis.
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This sentence shows up in the opening paragraph:

"But amidst all this scholarly activity, the special intuition of the female slave remains unpenetrated."

At that point you already know your in the company of someone who understands the power of meaningful words.
1 vote thenumeraltwo | Jun 9, 2021 |
A staple on the syllabus. If you want to explore intersectionality at its core, and understand deeply the racism and classism of the women’s liberation movement, start here. Angela Davis takes us from the early abolitionist days to the more modern feminist movements.
Review from: The Write of Your Life. Books on race relations in America.
  stlukeschurch | Mar 7, 2021 |
(i need to re-read this) ( )
  reg_lt | Feb 7, 2020 |
An early "bible" of sorts for me when I was just starting to expand my thinking on ... well ... women, race, and class. ( )
  subabat | Mar 19, 2018 |
Important book to read. In light of the 2016 election the concept of "intersectionality" is still a highly relevant topic. Davis looks at how race, class and gender has affected feminism in US history. These essays look at women, men and their roles they play and how quite often the struggle has often left behind particular groups (and often people who are part of more than one of these groups).
 
That's basically the book. It's worth reading, although I'll have to admit, I found this to be a struggle. I don't like collections of essays, even though the topic was interesting and I learned a lot (and found many parts of the text highly relevant to recent events and events in history). The book was also published in the early 80's and I'd love to see an update.
 
That said, it's still highly relevant and it's definitely a text that should be read a lot more widely. I'm not sure if I really got as much as I really should have out of it but that's definitely a reflection of me and not on the text. I'm glad I read it and reminds me I should really learn more.
 
I bought it but in retrospect it would have been better to borrow it from the library. For certain readers though, this would have be a good book to have as a reference. ( )
  HoldMyBook | Feb 11, 2018 |
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To my mother, Sallye B. Davis
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When the influential scholar Ulrich B. Phillips declared in 1918 that slavery in the Old South had impressed upon African savages and their native-born descendants the glorious stamp of civilization, he set the stage for a long and passionate debate.
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A powerful study of the women's liberation movement in the U.S., from abolitionist days to the present, that demonstrates how it has always been hampered by the racist and classist biases of its leaders. From the widely revered and legendary political activist and scholar Angela Davis.

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Book on race, class and feminism by black US communist Angela Davis.
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