HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Noughts and Crosses (2001)

by Malorie Blackman

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Noughts and Crosses (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,895647,413 (3.8)77
Two young people are forced to make a stand in this thought-provoking look at racism and prejudice in an alternate society. Sephy is a Cross -- a member of the dark-skinned ruling class. Callum is a Nought -- a “colourless” member of the underclass who were once slaves to the Crosses. The two have been friends since early childhood, but that’s as far as it can go. In their world, Noughts and Crosses simply don’t mix. Against a background of prejudice and distrust, intensely highlighted by violent terrorist activity, a romance builds between Sephy and Callum -- a romance that is to lead both of them into terrible danger. Can they possibly find a way to be together? In this gripping, stimulating and totally absorbing novel, black and white are right and wrong.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 77 mentions

English (63)  German (1)  All languages (64)
Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
A book with an interesting premise - Sephy is a cross and Callum is a nought. Can they overcome society’s prejudices and be together? Unfortunately the story becomes progressively more ridiculous and problematic as it goes on, resulting in a very disappointing exploration of an interesting idea. ( )
  Amzzz | Jan 24, 2022 |
I can see why this is a very successful young adult book - racism with the races reversed. But as an adult it lacks nuance to keep my interest.

So one of those young adult books that is great for young adults, but not for older adults. ( )
  nx74defiant | Oct 29, 2021 |
I just finished reading this book sobbing like an absolute baby. I just couldn’t put it down.

It certainly is an eye-opener of a book, where in a fictional world the white people are the disadvantaged, discriminated and criminalist ones.

I can’t wait to start the next book in the series tomorrow (as it’s late here and I need to sleep - otherwise I would start right now)

Definitely recommend ( )
  Atalanta_Tolputt | Sep 6, 2021 |
If you read YA books or like the dystopia genre I think Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman could be a strong contender. It is fast earning a reputation as a modern YA classic. This is a rare book that has it all; love, dystopia, heartbreak, racism, terrorism and it’s a page-turner too. This book will move you to your core as you follow the twists and turns of Callum and Sephy’s story.

At the core of this novel is a simple love story; the story of Callum and Sephy , a pair of childhood sweethearts destined to become star-crossed lovers (like Romeo and Juliet but edgier), who cannot enjoy a normal relationship because Callum is a Nought and Sephy is a Cross. Noughts are white people with a low position and society and Crosses, who control the society, are black and they lead segregated lives.

It is a book that will make you think long and hard about prejudice in the world around you and it will allow you to walk in someone else’s shoes. Blackman is examining the white-black race divide but the lessons in this novel could be applied to any community that has divisions of this nature. This is the book for you if you enjoy thought-provoking, emotional books : [b:The Hate U Give|32075671|The Hate U Give|Angie Thomas|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1476284759l/32075671._SY75_.jpg|49638190] by Angie Thomas, [b:Divergent|13335037|Divergent (Divergent, #1)|Veronica Roth|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1328559506l/13335037._SY75_.jpg|13155899] by Veronika Roth, Suzanne Collins’ [b:The Hunger Games|2767052|The Hunger Games (The Hunger Games, #1)|Suzanne Collins|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1447303603l/2767052._SX50_.jpg|2792775] trilogy and [b:The Fault in Our Stars|11870085|The Fault in Our Stars|John Green|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1360206420l/11870085._SY75_.jpg|16827462] by John Green are in the same vein.

Callum and Sephy’s paths cross when Callum’s mum works as a cleaner for Sephy’s wealthy family. Even as children they find themselves drawn to each other and have a special place by the sea where they meet up secretly. Each chapter alternates between the point of view of Callum and Sephy and we get a full 360 degree view of the issues that affect them. They are pure, idealistic characters, who seem too good for the twisted society around them. Will circumstances drag them down?

Their situation gets complicated when Callum is allowed to attend Sephy’s school (Noughts had previously been banned). This section is inspired by real events in the Civil rights movement, when black people were allowed equal rights to attend high schools and universities in the Southern states of America. This is a negative turning point in their relationship as society judges them for wanting to be together and ultimately this begins to drive them apart.

Tragedy strikes Callum’s family and this leads his brother to become radicalised and join the Liberation Militia, an organisation who launch terrorist attacks against Crosses. Will Callum turn his back on his principles and on Sephy to follow in Jude’s footsteps?

What has blown me away about my experience of reading this novel is how current it still feels, despite being 12 years old. Due to the polarised world that we live in, it is even more relevant in some ways. Noughts and Crosses came out in 2001 when there wasn’t quite the range of high quality choices in young people’s publishing that we have today. Instantly popular, many more books followed, including the newer book, [b:Crossfire|41950149|Crossfire (Noughts & Crosses, #5)|Malorie Blackman|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1549473294l/41950149._SY75_.jpg|65452028]

Malorie Blackman is now a superstar on the UKYA scene. She has been Children’s Laureate and has almost 41,000 Twitter followers. I have been to book events where teenagers and adults queue for hours to meet her. She has recently written a race focused episode of the new Dr Who series, there’s a new theatre production of Noughts and Crosses showing in London this summer and a much-awaited TV adaptation has just started filming.

I admire how Malorie Blackman has created her dystopia, she doesn’t rely on too much sci-fi but rather it is the inhuman way that Noughts and Crosses treat each other that cement this dystopian nightmare. This is a special story, a Romeo and Juliet for our times and you will fall in love with Callum and Sephy as you read it.

Trigger warning: Readers should be aware that in addition to the issues of race, many difficult themes are covered: alcoholism, violence, suicide and capital punishment are just some of them however they are sensitively treated. ( )
1 vote SapphireMoonlight23 | Aug 5, 2021 |
Callum and Sephy have grown up together, best friends, and now in their teens maybe their friendship is developing into something more. But there is a problem, Callum is a Nought, and Sephy is a Cross, and the two don’t mix, not in this world. But there are moves towards progress and integration, or at least hopes of that in the future; for the first time noughts will be allowed into Sephy’s school, and Callum is one of the four that managed to pass the entrance exams. He will be allowed in, but he knows that it will be difficult, Sephy is more innocent. She’s just glad they’ll be able to spend more time together. Neither knows just how hard it is going to be, and all that is before the bomb goes off

http://www.susanhatedliterature.net/2010/06/28/noughts-crosses/ ( )
  Fence | Jan 5, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
There are flaws. The white family sounds like a black one. The novel is told in alternate voices, with stretches of dialogue that make it seem more like a screenplay than a novel, and the characters are archetypes rather than particular, individuated people. In the end, it doesn't matter, because the story is so gripping and the world of Pangea so nightmarishly vivid.
added by Katya0133 | editNew Statesman, Amanda Craig
 

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Blackman, Malorieprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Black, SyanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chequer, PaulNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
'That's just the way it is. Some things will never change. That's just the way it is. But don't you believe them.' - Bruce Hornsby and the Range
'That's just the way it is.
Some things will never change.
That's just the way it is.
But don't you believe them.'
Bruce Hornsby and the Range
Dedication
This book is dedicated with love to my husband, Neil, And to our daughter, Elizabeth.
First words
'Honestly, Mrs Hadley,' said Meggie McGregor, wiping her eyes.
'Honestly, Mrs Hadley,' said Meggie McGregor, wiping her eyes. 'That sense of humour of yours will be he death of me yet!'
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Two young people are forced to make a stand in this thought-provoking look at racism and prejudice in an alternate society. Sephy is a Cross -- a member of the dark-skinned ruling class. Callum is a Nought -- a “colourless” member of the underclass who were once slaves to the Crosses. The two have been friends since early childhood, but that’s as far as it can go. In their world, Noughts and Crosses simply don’t mix. Against a background of prejudice and distrust, intensely highlighted by violent terrorist activity, a romance builds between Sephy and Callum -- a romance that is to lead both of them into terrible danger. Can they possibly find a way to be together? In this gripping, stimulating and totally absorbing novel, black and white are right and wrong.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.8)
0.5
1 19
1.5 1
2 25
2.5 7
3 75
3.5 26
4 124
4.5 13
5 121

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 177,094,620 books! | Top bar: Always visible