HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Capitalism and Freedom: Fortieth Anniversary Edition (1962)

by Milton Friedman

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,194286,154 (3.88)16
Selected by the Times Literary Supplement as one of the "hundred most influential books since the war" How can we benefit from the promise of government while avoiding the threat it poses to individual freedom? In this classic book, Milton Friedman provides the definitive statement of his immensely influential economic philosophy--one in which competitive capitalism serves as both a device for achieving economic freedom and a necessary condition for political freedom. The result is an accessible text that has sold well over half a million copies in English, has been translated into eighteen languages, and shows every sign of becoming more and more influential as time goes on.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 16 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
A very interesting read and especially interesting to see what Friedman's ideas are back in 1962. The read difficulty isn't too high but the book is more theoretical in nature than actual. That is not to say that Friedman doesn't lay out his talking points and provide some examples. He has some really great breakdown on economic ideas such as the control of money and a very interesting discussion on capitalism's natural limiting discrimination. The biggest surprise to me was Friedman's not so libertarian concerning the alleviation of poverty (like a reverse income tax) and a few other interesting points that I see Friedman further developing out of as he progresses his study.

Friedman tends to write as he speaks. He always is very understanding of people's set mindsets but tries to get people to think outside the "good intentions" and look at the "unintended consequences". This is a good primer into true liberal (in the purest definition of the word) thought when it comes to economics. He outright attributes a lot of his ground work thinking in Adam Smith's "The Wealth of Nations". His thoughts are grounded in good logic and more in reality than results that are hoped for that are characteristic of the past 100 years of economic/political/and regulation guidelines. Friedman is very smart and his ideas route in your head long after putting the book down. Two chapters in, I went out and bought his follow up book "Free To Choose". Final Grade - A- ( )
  agentx216 | Aug 1, 2022 |
When Milton Friedman’s "Capitalism and Freedom" came out in 1962, his was a rare voice defending classical liberal values and the free enterprise system. For years his ideas were unloved in ruling circles, as the leviathan unleashed by F.D.R.’s New Deal pressed its tentacles even further into the flesh of American society through Johnson’s Great Society and beyond.

But after nearly a generation wandering in the wilderness, Friedman lived to see the vindication of his ideas, as big government solutions repeatedly failed, and free market approaches out-performed.

My review continues: https://www.whynotlibertarianism.com/capitalism-and-freedom.html ( )
  Cicero | Jun 22, 2022 |
I read this book as part of a class on Political Thought. I had food poisoning at the time that this book was assigned, but I would have been puking even if I hadn't had those undercooked pancakes that day. This book is so full of ruling class whitewash that it is truly difficult to read.

The text, essentialized, was as follows: Capitalism offers rich people choices. These choices can be redefined as freedom. Therefore Capitalism offers freedom.

Left out is what to do if you don't have the luxury of being able to buy choices. Left out is how these choices in fact necessitate others' oppression and their lack of freedom. Left out is any semblence of understanding of what it is to work for those choices to be available to some.

Actually, let me rephrase: Friedman mentions these points specifically on several occaisions. He then explains that it is not anyone's business how to answer these questions, all policy is to be made between stock holders and companies itself, no matter who else is affected.

When Milton Friedman died, I gave everyone I knew a high-five.

Recommended for: masochists. ( )
  magonistarevolt | Apr 20, 2020 |
Interesting for historical reasons. Of course I feel kinda sad for him now, his thinking was so cute and ... hmmm... dishonest, but still the unusual ideas were good. It was refreshing and there were good things in it.

But really, his pretended blissful ignorance of vast & fundamental inequalities in information, market behaviors, access to corruption, class, wealth, access to tools and resources, a properly operating justice system, ability to use the state, the allocation of the state's collections.

In a way, this is the Tea Party: pretend that there should be no state, that is, except for the vast, unregulated, uncontrolled state supporting the military industrial complex, and that support's Mr Friedman's university.

Some quotes:

" a black man in a city can get the same services as a rich white person by saving, and the same for all other items"

"Various emperical studies have demonstrated that the return on investment in education far exceeds the return on other forms of capital. This implies a problem with capital markets"

" [if there were school vouchers then ] all kinds of schools would spring up" ( )
  GirlMeetsTractor | Mar 22, 2020 |
Milton Friedman's builds his case from Freedom, He makes interesting case about a lot of different things in society. His example of Medical school unions are thought provoking, I really loved this book, there were a lot of big ideas on this book. I feel there is no simple answer but only continuous dialogue. I felt when power gets concentrated somewhere, there is a high chance of corruption, misuse of it. I think if someone starts from Man is perfect and is able to build a perfect system, he would differ from Friedman and other followers of him. It seems that, you can easily find out the differences from each person's premise on which he build the whole model. Friedman argues a lot for freedom and says, Men ought to have freedom to prosper, they will achieve better. In this book, he goes through a lot of things, I was surprised to find schooling system, unions included.
If you like big ideas, you like enjoy this book. However, you won't find solutions but just know his outline.

"Men are born of equal rights, not equal things." - Edmund Burke ( )
  gottfried_leibniz | Apr 5, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
In this classic book, Capitalism and Freedom, Friedman presents his case for capitalism and why it's the best type of economic system for both freedom and prosperity.
 

Belongs to Publisher Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
To Janet and David and their contemporaries, who must carry the torch of liberty on its next lap
Dedication
First words
In my preface to the 1982 edition of this book, I documented a dramatic shift in the climate of opinion, manifested in the difference between the way this book was treated when it was first published in 1962, and the way my wife's and my subsequent book, Free to Choose, presenting the same philosophy, was treated when it was published in 1980.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
Selected by the Times Literary Supplement as one of the "hundred most influential books since the war" How can we benefit from the promise of government while avoiding the threat it poses to individual freedom? In this classic book, Milton Friedman provides the definitive statement of his immensely influential economic philosophy--one in which competitive capitalism serves as both a device for achieving economic freedom and a necessary condition for political freedom. The result is an accessible text that has sold well over half a million copies in English, has been translated into eighteen languages, and shows every sign of becoming more and more influential as time goes on.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.88)
0.5 2
1 10
1.5
2 23
2.5
3 25
3.5 7
4 91
4.5 14
5 75

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 179,852,098 books! | Top bar: Always visible