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When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in… (1984)

by Paula J. Giddings

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425345,841 (4.17)4
This book is a testimonial to the profound influence of African-American women on race and women's movements throughout American history. Drawing on speeches, diaries, letters, and other original documents, the author portrays how black women have transcended racist and sexist attitudes - often confronting white feminists and black male leaders alike - to initiate social and political reform. From the open disregard for the rights of slave women to examples of today's more covert racism and sexism in civil rights and women'sorganizations, the author illuminates the black woman's crusade for equality. In the process, she paints portraits of black female leaders, such as anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells, educator and FDR adviser Mary McLeod Bethune, and the heroic civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, among others, who fought both overt and institutionalized oppression.… (more)
  1. 00
    Ida: A Sword Among Lions by Paula J. Giddings (lilysea)
    lilysea: If this enormous (but fabulous!) biography of Ida B. Wells is a bit daunting, read Giddings book When and Where I Enter. It contains a good section on Wells and a terrific look at the history of the United States from the perspective of African American women, in general.… (more)
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Showing 3 of 3
This a groundbreaking volume of African American women--of all women--sexism and racism. Brilliant and well-reseached. But not pedantic. Giddings style of writing is down to earth, humorous, easy to follow. This is a must have for any complete library of history, women or feminism. ( )
  Valjeanne | Aug 10, 2012 |
It's been quite some time since I've read this but it has some good information about African-American history in the U.S. The book specifically focuses on women (obviously) and was one of the most influential (and still one of the broadest) to bring an historical look at black women in the U.S. to print. I believe I found some of it dry the first time I read it, but I often have that reaction to (factual) historical work. ( )
  andersonden | Dec 16, 2008 |
Giddings makes history read like a novel. This book is worth its weight in crude oil for the analysis of the U.S. women's suffrage movement and its deal with the white supremacy devil alone. An excellent introduction to African American history for those not yet well-versed in the topic. Great for undergrads and grad students and non-academic readers alike. ( )
1 vote lilysea | Aug 25, 2008 |
Showing 3 of 3
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Only the BLACK WOMAN can say "when and where I enter, in the quiet, undisputed dignity of my woman hood, without violence and without suing or special patronage, then and there the whole...race enters with me" - Anna Julia Cooper, 1892
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This book is a testimonial to the profound influence of African-American women on race and women's movements throughout American history. Drawing on speeches, diaries, letters, and other original documents, the author portrays how black women have transcended racist and sexist attitudes - often confronting white feminists and black male leaders alike - to initiate social and political reform. From the open disregard for the rights of slave women to examples of today's more covert racism and sexism in civil rights and women'sorganizations, the author illuminates the black woman's crusade for equality. In the process, she paints portraits of black female leaders, such as anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells, educator and FDR adviser Mary McLeod Bethune, and the heroic civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, among others, who fought both overt and institutionalized oppression.

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