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Prometheus Bound

by Aeschylus

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1,2282015,574 (3.93)31
Drama. Fiction. Folklore. HTML:

Though some scholars have recently begun to question whether Aeschylus authored the play Prometheus Bound, there is no question that this classic of ancient Greek literature is a literary achievement befitting the playwright known as the Father of Tragedy. In the play, Zeus tethers a Titan named Prometheus to a gigantic boulder for all of eternity as punishment for bestowing the gift of fire upon mankind. Will the tortured giant ever escape his ghoulish prison?

.… (more)
  1. 10
    The Myth of Sisyphus [essay] by Albert Camus (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Reading Aeschylus's play through the lens of Camus's interpretation of the absurd hero is interesting.
  2. 00
    Three Greek Plays: Prometheus Bound / Agamemnon / The Trojan Women by Edith Hamilton (themulhern)
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» See also 31 mentions

English (18)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (20)
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
Prometeu Acorrentado é uma tragédia grega escrita por Ésquilo por volta de 450 a.C.

Ésquilo continua o Mito de Prometeu, introduzido em Os Trabalhos e os Dias por Hesíodo, narrando a punição de Prometeu, por roubar o fogo de Hefesto e a sabedoria de Atenas, em ser acorrentado em um rochedo no Cáucaso por Hefesto, Cratos e Bia e ter o fígado comido durante o dia por uma águia.

Na tragédia Zeus é retratado como um deus cruel e tirânico que governa por meio da força e da opressão. Arbitrariedade e tirania evidenciadas também em Io, uma sacerdotisa mortal que é transformada em uma vaca por Zeus para protegê-la da ira de Hera, forçada a vagar pelo mundo em sua forma animal.

Preso na rocha Prometeu faz diversas previsões sobre o futuro, incluindo uma em que ele prevê a queda de Zeus e a ascensão de um novo governante, um filho, que seria mais poderoso.

A previsão é vista como uma forma de reafirmar a luta de Prometeu pela liberdade e pela justiça. Ao prever a queda de Zeus, Prometeu mostra que a tirania divina não pode prevalecer para sempre, e que há uma possibilidade de mudança e renovação no mundo. Além disso, ele também demonstra sua confiança na capacidade humana de superar as dificuldades e alcançar a redenção. ( )
  jgrossi | Nov 12, 2023 |
Listened to a translation by Plumtre. I enjoyed Edith Hamilton's translation a good deal more; hers is so much more pithy. Performance still enjoyable, some sound effects. ( )
  themulhern | May 12, 2023 |
Best Western Classic so far! I started with Homer's Illiad by Peter Green in 2019. Up to Aeschylus in 2021. Prometheus Bound translated by Herbert Weir Smyth is brilliant! Love it! Learned so much from Prometheus. Enjoyed every moment with this play! ( )
  MamaBearBooks | Apr 12, 2022 |
This is probably the best and most classic telling of Prometheus, from his giving fire to man from the noblest of reasons to how horribly and seemingly unjustly that Zeus punishes him.

All arts and tools come from Prometheus, after all, and he should always be considered the greatest of all friends of mankind even though he is a titan.

However, he's also the one that pushed us to improve our intellect in the same way he did for himself, and in doing so, he brought harm upon himself. See a trend? We created war with the smelting of ore into weapons, after all. It's not all about cooking and keeping warm or creating medicine.

Was Zeus right? Was it right to keep an immortal chained and have a bird eat his liver for all eternity? Or was this just the graphic depiction of what we will always do to ourselves?

I wish I could read the other two parts of this play. I think that would be awesome. :) But alas. What we've got is still pretty raw and emotional and delightfully slanted. After all, we're meant to sympathize entirely with Prometheus throughout the play.

It reminds me an awful lot of Paradise Lost. :) Good motivations and charismatic leaders leading to roads paved to hell. :)
( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
An amazing play. This is a recommended read for anyone interested in classics, ancient Greek literature, and drama. ( )
  DanielSTJ | Dec 24, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (121 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Aeschylusprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bottoni, GerolamoEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burke, Marjorie L.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Droysen, Johann GustavTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Groeneboom, P.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lowell, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roche, PaulTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stolpe, JanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Svensson, Lars-HåkanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thomson, George DerwentTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Torné i Teixidó, RamonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weissman, AlanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Tragedies by Aischylos (indirect)

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Epigraph
Dedication
for KIUMON FRIAR
homage with the great tradition
(Let any greeks here enter in by lot
according to the law,
and I shall prophesy as the god leads on.)
-The Eumenides 31-33

Slices from Homer's mighty dinners
(Aeschylus, of his own works: Athenaeus 8.347e)
First words
This is the world's limit that we have come to; this is the Scythian country, an untrodden desolation. - (tr. Grene, 1942)
We've come to the end, then--the world's end:
This Scythian tract, a desert without men.,
[Tr. Paul Roche, 1964]
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Disambiguation notice
This is for translated versions of Prometheus Bound, not the original greek.
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Drama. Fiction. Folklore. HTML:

Though some scholars have recently begun to question whether Aeschylus authored the play Prometheus Bound, there is no question that this classic of ancient Greek literature is a literary achievement befitting the playwright known as the Father of Tragedy. In the play, Zeus tethers a Titan named Prometheus to a gigantic boulder for all of eternity as punishment for bestowing the gift of fire upon mankind. Will the tortured giant ever escape his ghoulish prison?

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