HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Twenty Prose Poems

by Charles Baudelaire

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1652164,995 (4.27)None
From the introduction by Michael Hamburger: "Baudelaire's prose poems were written at long intervals during the last twelve or thirteen years of his life. The prose poem was a medium much suited to his habits and character. Being pre-eminently a moralist, he needed a medium that enabled him to illustrate a moral insight as briefly and vividly as possible. Being an artist and sensualist, he needed a medium that was epigrammatic or aphoristic, but allowed him scope for fantasy and for that element of suggestiveness which he considered essential to beauty. His thinking about society and politics, as about everything else, was experimental; like the thinking of most poets it drew on experience and imagination, rather than on facts and general arguments. That is another reason why the prose poem proved a medium so congenial to Baudelaire." Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) was a French poet, essayist, art critic, and translator for Edgar Allan Poe. He is credited with coining the term "modernity" to describe the fleeting, ephemeral experience of life in an urban metropolis and the responsibility art has to capture that experience.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

These twenty pieces were written over a number of years and published separately in various periodicals. They don't form a sequence or have any relation to one another, and actually form part of a larger collection of around 50.
The term "prose poem" is not necessarily the best term for these works because its meaning is rather vague, however a more informative phrase would perhaps fail to capture whatever similarity these various short works have in common.
That is the ability to make a point, and to render in the reader a poetic state of mind. Of course, this can often be achieved as well by a scenic view, a good novel, an artwork, or an everyday encounter, as it can by a "prose poem", but these works do fill these requirements too and are written in prose so we can leave it that.
The topics of the different pieces are various, and being so show us many different emotional and aesthetic facets of the author's character, personality, and tastes.
These are probably best read one or two at a time, with space for reflection. It is therefore a good book for dipping into during brief available moments, and does not require a lot of effort on behalf of the reader.
This volume, published by "City Lights" press also contains side by side the original French, with the English translation, which would be excellent for the reader of French, the new student, or simply the curious reader. At only 79 pages including a 7 page introduction, and parallel language texts, it can be appreciated that most works are between one and two pages.
As an introduction to Baudelaire this is great, and I would recommend its literary quality and ease of reading.
If I was looking to compare this to works by an other author, there are many similarities here to the shorter of Virginia Woolf's works which capture a similar aesthetic/moral sensibility and impressionistic regard for the everyday event. However Baudelaire tends toward the more flamboyant, and to an epigrammatic certainty found often in Nietzsche's collections of aphorisms. ( )
  P_S_Patrick | Sep 9, 2018 |
no reviews | add a review

Belongs to Publisher Series

dtv zweisprachig (Französisch)
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

From the introduction by Michael Hamburger: "Baudelaire's prose poems were written at long intervals during the last twelve or thirteen years of his life. The prose poem was a medium much suited to his habits and character. Being pre-eminently a moralist, he needed a medium that enabled him to illustrate a moral insight as briefly and vividly as possible. Being an artist and sensualist, he needed a medium that was epigrammatic or aphoristic, but allowed him scope for fantasy and for that element of suggestiveness which he considered essential to beauty. His thinking about society and politics, as about everything else, was experimental; like the thinking of most poets it drew on experience and imagination, rather than on facts and general arguments. That is another reason why the prose poem proved a medium so congenial to Baudelaire." Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) was a French poet, essayist, art critic, and translator for Edgar Allan Poe. He is credited with coining the term "modernity" to describe the fleeting, ephemeral experience of life in an urban metropolis and the responsibility art has to capture that experience.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.27)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 2
3.5 1
4 7
4.5 2
5 12

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 204,111,804 books! | Top bar: Always visible