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The House by the Medlar Tree (1881)

by Giovanni Verga

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Ciclo dei Vinti (1)

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1,2001916,076 (3.51)36
Giovanni Verga (1840-1922) is the most important of the Italian Realist School of novelists. This new edition of The House by the Medlar Tree (I Malavoglia) makes the complete English version of his masterpiece available once more. The story of the Malavoglia, a family of poor Sicilian fisherman, is Verga's moving rendering of the theme of mankind's struggle for self-betterment, the dignity of the struggle in the face of poverty and hardship, and the tragedy that the struggle inevitably incurs. D. H. Lawrence described Vega's work as "Homeric." Rayond Rosenthal's translation of I Malavoglia is the only complete version of this novel in English and conveys Vega's lyrical realism and the flavor of Sicialian village life superbly. The book is introduced by Giovanni Ceccheti, whose own translations of Verga, Mastro-don Gesualdo and The She-Wolf and Other Stories, are also available from California.… (more)
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» See also 36 mentions

English (8)  Italian (7)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  French (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (18)
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Sicily in 1863, just after it became part of the Kingdom of Italy; the book is really a social portrait of poverty. Exceptionally good characterizations, great storytelling. ( )
  Gypsy_Boy | Aug 26, 2023 |
Read for Reading 1001 February BOTM. This story set in Sicily by Giovanni Verga tells the story of three generations of Sicilian fishermen family. First published in 1881 it is a novel that is considered a “realism” novel, though Verga did not want to be considered any certain type of author. He is considered to be a contributor to the development of the novel. Verga was influenced by Flaubert and Zola and this book most reminded me of Germinal by Zola. The family has many setbacks, loses everything to slowly work there way back. It is a story of hard work and poverty set in Sicily. ( )
  Kristelh | Feb 5, 2022 |
DNF at page 67

Let's say that I'll save this one for when I am old and wise :P
1 vote Shay17 | Mar 30, 2018 |
Soffocante l'arrendevolezza al destino,purtroppo ancora socialmente presente. ( )
  AlessandraEtFabio | Dec 22, 2017 |
Giovanni Verga's novel "The House by the Medlar Tree" was a really interesting story once it got going. I liked the book overall but it was a very slow read for me.

The book is the story of the Malavoglia family, who are poor fishermen in Sicily. A tragic accident sends their fortunes spiraling downward and the family tries repeatedly to climb out of poverty, to return to the place where they started.

It was difficult to get into this book at first-- there were a lot of characters and it was hard to keep everyone straight. I ultimately decided to read it without focusing on characters and just letting the story unfold. About midway through the book, the story really got going and the importance of the characters really sorted itself out. Glad to have continued on, as the book was worth the effort. ( )
  amerynth | Mar 10, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (40 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Verga, GiovanniAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Antonucci, EmilCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Craig, Mary A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Glückert, RenateCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
König, RenéTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Klemin, DianaTypographysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Landry, JudithTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lane, EricIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lane, MariePhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mosbacher, EricTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Un tempo i Malavoglia erano stati numerosi come i sassi della strada vecchia di Trezza; ce n'erano persino ad Ognina, e ad Aci Castello, tutti buona e brava gente di mare, proprio all'opposto di quel che sembrava al nomignolo, come dev'essere.
There was a time when the Malavoglia were as thick as the stones on the old Trezza road.
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Giovanni Verga (1840-1922) is the most important of the Italian Realist School of novelists. This new edition of The House by the Medlar Tree (I Malavoglia) makes the complete English version of his masterpiece available once more. The story of the Malavoglia, a family of poor Sicilian fisherman, is Verga's moving rendering of the theme of mankind's struggle for self-betterment, the dignity of the struggle in the face of poverty and hardship, and the tragedy that the struggle inevitably incurs. D. H. Lawrence described Vega's work as "Homeric." Rayond Rosenthal's translation of I Malavoglia is the only complete version of this novel in English and conveys Vega's lyrical realism and the flavor of Sicialian village life superbly. The book is introduced by Giovanni Ceccheti, whose own translations of Verga, Mastro-don Gesualdo and The She-Wolf and Other Stories, are also available from California.

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