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The Prophet (1923)

by Kahlil Gibran

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Prophet (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
14,466167402 (4.1)155
The Prophet represents the acme of Kahlil Gibran's achievement. Writing in English, Gibran adopted the tone and cadence of King James I's Bible, fusing his personalised Christian philosophy with a spirit and oriental wisdom that derives from the richly mixed influences of his native Lebanon.His language has a breath-taking beauty. Before returning to his birthplace, Almustafa, the 'prophet', is asked for guidance by the people of Orphalese. His words, redolent with love and understanding, call for universal unity, and affirm Gibran's certainty of the correlated nature of all existence, and of reincarnation. The Prophet has never lost its immediate appeal and has become a ubiquitous touchstone of spiritual literature.… (more)
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» See also 155 mentions

English (150)  Spanish (6)  French (3)  Dutch (2)  Catalan (2)  Slovak (1)  Piratical (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (166)
Showing 1-5 of 150 (next | show all)
A favorite in high school ( )
  AnnFarrar | Jun 22, 2024 |
Til Per
Hjertlig tillykke med dagen!
Fra Gunnar, Jofrid, Hilde, Karsten og Bjorn Olav
  Kringla | May 22, 2024 |
Kahlil Gibran’s “The Prophet” is a mesmerizing collection of poetic essays that delve into the complexities of the human experience. Introduced to me by my wife, this book has been a beacon of wisdom in my literary journey. Gibran’s prose is both lyrical and profound, offering insights on love, work, joy, sorrow, freedom, and more—each chapter a gem that resonates with timeless relevance. The philosophical depth is matched by the sheer beauty of the language, making it a work that invites reflection and evokes emotion. While some may find the style overly didactic, the majority will appreciate the universal truths and the elegant simplicity with which they are conveyed. It’s a book that deserves a place on the shelf of any contemplative reader, earning a solid 4 out of 5 stars for its enduring ability to inspire and enlighten. ( )
  mlheintz | May 6, 2024 |
The Prophet is a book of 26 prose poetry fables written in English by the Lebanese - American poet and writer Kahlil Gibran. It is his best known work.
The prophet Al Mustafa has lived in the city of Orphalese for 12 years and is about to board a ship which will carry him home. He is stopped by a group of people, with whom he discusses topics such as life and the human condition. The book is divided into chapters dealing with love, marriage, children, giving, eating and drinking, work, joy and sorrow, houses, clothes, buying and selling, crime and punishment, laws, freedom, reason and passion, pain, self-knowledge, teaching, friendship, talking, time, good and evil, prayer, pleasure, beauty, religion, and death.
  MenoraChurch | Feb 10, 2024 |
What [b:The Prophet|28461875|The Prophet|Kahlil Gibran|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1452067735s/28461875.jpg|2938937] might lack in philosophical rigor or depth, it gains in beauty and feeling. I think it misses the point to say that Gibran's treatment of any of his topics, from justice, to death, to good and evil, are complete in the face of centuries of human thought and contemplation on these inherently human questions. I'd tender the suggestion that the Prophet of Orphalese doesn't need to be right, or even for the reader to agree with most of what he says, to have an impact. Yes, that's a little generic and not the most useful, but the takeaway is that I'm not going to judge the Prophet on its content per se but the experience of reading it and listening to it. I love these pieces because it provides a solid counterpoint to many of our prevailing modes of thinking; its tone and metaphor and imagery force you to go "wait, have I been doing it wrong the whole time?" Often I tell myself no, sometimes I tell myself yes, but either way I think it helped my "soul unfold itself, like a lotus of countless petals". ( )
  Zedseayou | Jan 30, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 150 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gibran, Kahlilprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Batchelor, PeterNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schaffer, UrlichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Almustafa, the chosen and the beloved, who was a dawn unto his own day, had waited twelve years in the city of Orphalese for his ship that was to return and bear him back to the isle of his birth.
Quotations
You have been told that, even like a chain, you are as weak as your weakest link.
This is but half the truth. You are also as strong as your strongest link.
To measure you by your smallest deed is to reckon the power of the ocean by the frailty of its foam.
And ever has it been that love knows not its own depth until the hour of desperation.
When love beckons to you, follow him, though his ways are hard and steep. And when his wings enfold you yield to him, though the sword hidden among his pinions may wound you. And when he speaks to you believe in him...
Your children are not your children. They are the sons and daughters of Life's longing for itself. They come through you but not from you, and though they are with you yet they belong not to you.
You give but little when you give of your possessions. It is when you give of yourself that you truly give.
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Disambiguation notice
Library of Congress please note: this is NOT a work written in Arabic and translated into English. It is a work written in English by a Lebanese poet.
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The Prophet represents the acme of Kahlil Gibran's achievement. Writing in English, Gibran adopted the tone and cadence of King James I's Bible, fusing his personalised Christian philosophy with a spirit and oriental wisdom that derives from the richly mixed influences of his native Lebanon.His language has a breath-taking beauty. Before returning to his birthplace, Almustafa, the 'prophet', is asked for guidance by the people of Orphalese. His words, redolent with love and understanding, call for universal unity, and affirm Gibran's certainty of the correlated nature of all existence, and of reincarnation. The Prophet has never lost its immediate appeal and has become a ubiquitous touchstone of spiritual literature.

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Book description
Kahlil Gibran, born in Lebanon, is well known throughout the Arab world as well as the West for his poetry, art and philosophy. The Prophet, one of Gibran’s most celebrated books, is his first published collection of poems and has been translated into more than twenty languages. This 2001 edition of his book includes 12 of Gibran’s own drawings.
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