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Thousand Cranes (1952)

by Yasunari Kawabata

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,536549,458 (3.78)83
Nobel Prize winner Yasunari Kawabata's Thousand Cranes is a luminous story of desire, regret, and the almost sensual nostalgia that binds the living to the dead.   While attending a traditional tea ceremony in the aftermath of his parents' deaths, Kikuji encounters his father's former mistress, Mrs. Ota. At first Kikuji is appalled by her indelicate nature, but it is not long before he succumbs to passion--a passion with tragic and unforeseen consequences, not just for the two lovers, but also for Mrs. Ota's daughter, to whom Kikuji's attachments soon extend. Death, jealousy, and attraction convene around the delicate art of the tea ceremony, where every gesture is imbued with profound meaning.… (more)
  1. 00
    The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes (sweetiegherkin)
    sweetiegherkin: Two short and seemingly simple, quiet novels that both have a lot to unpack & would be good for book club to discuss the deeper meanings.
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» See also 83 mentions

English (46)  Spanish (6)  Dutch (2)  All languages (54)
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
Tanto se ha hablado de Kawabata que el imposible no asociarlo con lo triste, este libro deja una marca en la memoria y un sabor amargo pero inolvidable. ( )
  Saraiest | Sep 17, 2021 |
A painterly novel. The physical descriptions of the tea ceramics and the garden ground the narrative in beauty. These descriptions draw one in to the novel's space. Ultimately though this is a story narrated by a man uneasy in himself, defined in part through his father's relationships with women he continues to know. As a reader it is hard to know what is real and what isn't, but then we only see through his eyes, which I guess is the point of it. A beautiful, disturbing read. ( )
  TomMcGreevy | Sep 2, 2021 |
A segunda guerra mundial teve um abalo profundo no mundo e no Japão em particular, nesta história o personagem principal vai recuperar a masculinidade perdida de sua geração, se reconciliando com seus antepassados, em uma história de desejo, arrependimento e nostalgia que liga os vivos aos mortos. Enquanto participava de uma tradicional cerimônia do chá após a morte de seus pais, Kikuji encontra a ex-amante de seu pai, Sra. Ota, não demora muito para que ele sucumba à paixão. Morte, ciúme e atração se reúnem em torno da arte delicada da cerimônia do chá, onde cada gesto é imbuído de um significado profundo. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Jul 21, 2021 |
NA
  pszolovits | Feb 3, 2021 |
I need to read this again. it was quite different to anything I have read recently. ( )
  mjhunt | Jan 22, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Yasunari Kawabataprimary authorall editionscalculated
Komatsu, FumiIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ouwehand, C.Afterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ouwehand, C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Seidensticker, Edward G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Even when he reached Kamakura and the Engakuji Temple, Kikuji did not know whether or not he would go to the tea ceremony.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Nobel Prize winner Yasunari Kawabata's Thousand Cranes is a luminous story of desire, regret, and the almost sensual nostalgia that binds the living to the dead.   While attending a traditional tea ceremony in the aftermath of his parents' deaths, Kikuji encounters his father's former mistress, Mrs. Ota. At first Kikuji is appalled by her indelicate nature, but it is not long before he succumbs to passion--a passion with tragic and unforeseen consequences, not just for the two lovers, but also for Mrs. Ota's daughter, to whom Kikuji's attachments soon extend. Death, jealousy, and attraction convene around the delicate art of the tea ceremony, where every gesture is imbued with profound meaning.

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fine depiction of life in a period randomly captured without pain.
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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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