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The Strange Case of Origami Yoda by Tom…
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The Strange Case of Origami Yoda (2010)

by Tom Angleberger, Jason L. Rosenstock (Illustrator)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Origami Yoda (1)

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1,6921046,110 (3.84)46
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» See also 46 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 104 (next | show all)
Lots of fun. I loved the character of the kid who created origami yoda - he's very odd, but his classmates realize that's okay. The only problem was that I totally failed when trying to follow the instructions and make my own yoda. But that's probably just me - I am origami-challenged. ( )
  JanetNoRules | Sep 17, 2018 |
Read for my mock-Newbery group, this is a title that none of the group want to read. I think they think that it is too"young" for them, so I volunteered to read it, even though my 7th-grader found it unremarkable. In another review, it was portrayed as a read-alike for the "WimpyKid" series, which has a younger readership.

I would say that it cleverly depicts a some 6th-graders, and that the premise is also clever. However, in the realm of the Newbery, it suffers from the "It's Like This, Cat" curse. This title won the Newbery in 1964 and, upon recent reading, didn't really hold up. The story is a solid one, but the characters and the setting (which are now historical) don't hold up. That said, I haven't given it to a kid to read.

Nonetheless, TSCOTOY is clever and even charming (what with all of the strong liking going on between the boys and girls), but doesn't fall into distinguished territory.

One caveat about this review: as I am writing it, a surly political ad is intractably blocking a goodly portion of my screen, so my touch-typing is not serving here. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
Read for my mock-Newbery group, this is a title that none of the group want to read. I think they think that it is too"young" for them, so I volunteered to read it, even though my 7th-grader found it unremarkable. In another review, it was portrayed as a read-alike for the "WimpyKid" series, which has a younger readership.

I would say that it cleverly depicts a some 6th-graders, and that the premise is also clever. However, in the realm of the Newbery, it suffers from the "It's Like This, Cat" curse. This title won the Newbery in 1964 and, upon recent reading, didn't really hold up. The story is a solid one, but the characters and the setting (which are now historical) don't hold up. That said, I haven't given it to a kid to read.

Nonetheless, TSCOTOY is clever and even charming (what with all of the strong liking going on between the boys and girls), but doesn't fall into distinguished territory.

One caveat about this review: as I am writing it, a surly political ad is intractably blocking a goodly portion of my screen, so my touch-typing is not serving here. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
I guess I should have known this would be super funny based on the number of kids I see reading it. This one is an absolute must for reluctant readers. I'm on a roll this week seeking out the best of the reluctant reader books for tweens, and this one is somewhere in the top 5.

Tommy is trying to figure out whether the origami finger puppet worn by the class geek, Dwight, has real power or whether it's just Dwight talking in a bad Yoda voice. So Tommy interviews all the kids who have asked Yoda for advice and recorded the outcomes in a case file. It's entertaining as heck. Harvey, the non-believer, and Tommy himself, comment on each case at the end of the file.

Most people don't think Dwight is smart enough to give out such great advice. Here's an example. When a kid accidentally brushes up against the bathroom sink, he's mortified because it looks like he peed in his pants. Dwight happens to be in the bathroom and recommends that the kid ask origami Yoda for advice. Yoda's advice: "All of pants you must wet." Brilliant. Yes it's weird to come to class all wet, but not as embarrassing as looking like you peed in your pants. ( )
  valorrmac | May 15, 2018 |
Wow. The kids in this book are complete pieces of shit and never really learn to be better people. This book could have done a fairly good job of teaching kids to deal with people that are obnoxious and possibly border-line special needs. Instead, they spend the whole book using him and treating him like crap without ever seeing the error of their ways. ( )
  benuathanasia | May 1, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 104 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Tom Anglebergerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rosenstock, Jason L.Illustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Arnst, MelissaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Artajo, MaximilianSprechersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Beckerman, Chad W.Cover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibson, JuliaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Häcke, MaximilianeSprechersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kämmer, LucaSprechersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kirschner, FinnSprechersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mölleken, NinaSprechersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mölleken, PatrickSprechersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McMahon, CollinÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Meid, MoritzSprechersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Parry, CharlotteNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ponti, BarbaraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ross, Jonathan ToddNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schepmann, HannahSprechersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schepmann, JuliaSprechersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schweder, MarcelKomponistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Steinbruner, GregNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Turetsky, MarkNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This book is dedicated to my parents, Wayne and Mary Ann, and my grandmother Arlene, who bought me my first Yoda action figure even though she thought he was ugly.
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The big question: Is Origami Yoda real?
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0810984253, Hardcover)

In this funny, uncannily wise portrait of the dynamics of a sixth-grade class and of the greatness that sometimes comes in unlikely packages, Dwight, a loser, talks to his classmates via an origami finger puppet of Yoda. If that weren’t strange enough, the puppet is uncannily wise and prescient. Origami Yoda predicts the date of a pop quiz, guesses who stole the classroom Shakespeare bust, and saves a classmate from popularity-crushing embarrassment with some well-timed advice. Dwight’s classmate Tommy wonders how Yoda can be so smart when Dwight himself is so clueless. With contributions from his puzzled classmates, he assembles the case file that forms this novel.

 
F&P Level: T
F&P Genre: RF

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:55 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Sixth-grader Tommy and his friends describe their interactions with a paper finger puppet of Yoda, worn by their weird classmate Dwight, as they try to figure out whether or not the puppet can really predict the future. Includes instructions for making Origami Yoda.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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